• SPOTLIGHT


    FEATURE ARTICLES

    RARE APPEARANCE:
    THE KRUGER BROTHERS

    Kruger BrothersThe Kruger Brothers are making a rare West Coast appearance at the Broad Theater in Santa Monica on Sunday, February 14, 2016 at 7:30pm.

    If you are not familiar with this trio (Jens on banjo, brother Uwe on guitar and Joel Landsberg on bass), get ready for an amazing evening. Sometimes referred to as “new traditional American music,”

    Read more: RARE APPEARANCE: THE KRUGER BROTHERS


    JUDY COLLINS
    ON VALENTINE’S DAY

    AT THE ROSE IN PASADENA - FEBRUARY 14, 2016

    By Ross Altman, PhD.

    Judy CollinsIf you’re looking for something special to do on Valentine’s Day you’ve come to the right place. A new concert venue is coming to Pasadena, sister club to the enormously successful Canyon Club in Agoura and the Saban Theatre in Beverly Hills. East Side, West Side, All Around the Town—The Rose at Paseo Colorado, 300 E. Colorado Blvd # 101, Pasadena, CA 91101.

    Read more: JUDY COLLINS ON VALENTINE’S DAY


    A DAY AT NAMM 2016 WITH ANNETTE & NOWELL

    By Annette Siegel (Living Tree Music)

    (Ed. Annette and Nowell Siegel run Living Tree Music which specializes in fretted instruments. Nowell is a luthier.)

    NAMM exterior 2 smNAMM 2016 was filled with all the usual glamour and glitz; enough noise to make your ears split (literally). A couple of exhibitors caught our eye.

    Read more: A DAY AT NAMM 2016 WITH ANNETTE & NOWELL


    NAMM Media Preview Day

    Wednesday, Jan. 20, 2016

    By Becky Nankivell & Michael Frey

    NAMM exterior 1 smWe’re excited to attend another NAMM Show as media representatives for FolkWorks. The National Association of Music Merchants annual 4-day trade show at the Anaheim Convention Center is a giant kaleidoscope of sights and sounds, with something for everyone. This year we thought we’d attend their Media Preview Day – maybe the lines for ID badges would be shorter!

    Read more: NAMM MEDIA PREVIEW DAY


    COLUMN OF THE WEEK

    January-February 2016

    CLEARING THE MUSICIAN’S CLOSET

    By Dennis Roger Reed

    instruments-smIf you are a musician of any sort, you own music stuff. Musical instruments, parts, CDs, records, tapes, strings, straps, stands…. well, you get the idea. And it is very easy to let this stuff accumulate, until your music closet (or room or studio) looks like one of those reality hoarder shows. You need one item, and an hour later you emerge with lots of things but not what you are looking for. What to do?

    By stereotype, musicians are not the most organized group of folks. I recall the banjo player who held his case together with an old belt. It had only been several years since the case had fallen off a bus in a third world country, and he was definitely going to fix it soon.

    If you own a musical case that is broken, you have five basic options. Repair it yourself, pay someone to repair, use it broken, throw it away or give it away. Those options work pretty well with other issues.

    Read more: CLEARING THE MUSICIAN’S CLOSET

    CONCERT REVIEWS

    THE JONES FAMILY SINGERS

    Pepperdine University - Friday, February 5, 2016

    From Russia to Malibu with Love

    By Ross Altman, PhD

    Jones FamilyRussians don’t speak much English; they knew only a few words, but they really needed only one to understand the nine-member African-American Jones Family Singers: Jesus. In an hour and a half part concert-part revival meeting they would have heard many times—as many times as Bruce Springsteen will sing Born in the USA, the Jones Family Singers will sing Come to me, Jesus! to the same effect—one powerful mantra that sums up their entire message.

    Read more: THE JONES FAMILY SINGERS


    Preaching the Blues with John Hammond, Jr.

    The Late Show at McCabe’s - January 29, 2016

    By Ross Altman, PhD

    John Hammond JrJohn Hammond Jr.’s National Steel guitar is seven years older than he is. I saw Hammond in twelve bars last night, and the late show at McCabe’s. America’s greatest blues singer and guitarist and harmonica player is the wrong color—“Never was a white man had the blues,” said Lead Belly. No one told John Hammond, Jr. who is now an elder statesman at 73 and still preaching the blues—ever since 1962, when he started his career right here in Los Angeles. I saw him on my late mother Rose’s Centenary—January 29, 1916-January 29, 2016—for which I wanted to do something special to celebrate.

    Read more: PREACHING THE BLUES WITH JOHN HAMMOND, JR.


    TOMMY EMMANUEL IN CONCERT

    Pepperdine Smothers Theatre - January 20, 2016

    Certified Guitar Player and a Class Act

    By Ross Altman, PhD

    Tommy EmmanuelThe Grand Canyon, the Hanging Gardens of Babylon, the Pyramids of Ancient Egypt, the Colossus of Rhodes, the Sphinx, to those and the other 8 Wonders of the World you can add Certified Guitar Player Tommy Emmanuel, who gave a spectacular concert last night (January 20, 2016) at the Pepperdine University Smothers Theatre in Malibu.

    Read more: TOMMY EMMANUEL IN CONCERT


    MARC COHN IN CONCERT

    Pepperdine Smothers Theatre - June 16, 2016

    Reflections on the 25th Anniversary
    Of Walking in Memphis

    By Ross Altman, PhD

    Marc CohnSinger-Songwriter Marc Cohn broke through to a national audience 25 years ago with his 1991 hit Walking in Memphis. But before he could walk in Memphis this Cleveland songwriter had to fly there, and thereby hangs a tale. James Taylor no less gave him the idea—to break out of a spell of writer’s block. Taylor told him to “try a geographic,” change his locale, get out of familiar places and habits and shake his mind up so it might be receptive to new experiences and ideas. Marc Cohn was telling this story last night by way of introducing his hit song and how it came to be written.

    Read more: WALKING IN MEMPHIS: MARC COHN IN CONCERT


    Here Comes the Knight: Van Morrison Live

    At the Shrine Auditorium - Friday January 15, 2016

    By Ross Altman, PhD

    Van MorrisonForget about Celtic Soul, forget about Irish Mystic, forget about Belfast Cowboy, and above all forget about 1970s soft-rock—all the comfortable hybrids we’ve grown accustomed to using to describe this now-70-year old Rock and Roll Hall of Fame singer-songwriter from Northern Ireland. Last night I heard the greatest pure blues singer of my life in downtown Los Angeles at the Shrine Auditorium

    Read more: HERE COMES THE KNIGHT: VAN MORRISON LIVE


    CD REVIEWS

    TITLE: ERIC & SUZY THOMPSON DVD

    ARTIST: ERIC & SUZY THOMPSON

    LABEL: OLD TIME TIKI PARLOUR

    RELEASE DATE: 2015

    By Steve Goldfield

    Eric  Suzy Thompson DVDDavid Bragger has filmed this superb 18-cut performance DVD of Berkeley's Eric and Suzy Thompson. The intimacy of the video puts you up close and personal. It's a bit like attending a concert and sitting a foot or two in front of the performers. The extensive liner notes also help you to get inside the tunes and songs. Not many musicians can play such a wide range of genres and maintain such a high level of excellence in each one, but Eric and Suzy are definitely up to the task.

    Read more: ERIC & SUZY THOMPSON DVD


    TITLE: INTO THIN HAIR

    ARTIST: THE SUNNY MOUNTAIN SERENADERS

    LABEL: NONE

    RELEASE DATE: 2015

    By Steve Goldfield

    SUNNY MOUNTAIN SERENADERS - INTO THIN HAIRThe Sunny Mountain Serenaders comprise three great old-time musicians who play very well together. I have known all three for a long time. Mark Campbell is a Virginia fiddler who has won the prestigious fiddle contest at the Appalachian String Band Festival in Clifftop, West Virginia. Mac Traynham, who plays banjo and harmonica and sings lead has won both banjo and fiddle at Clifftop. John Schwab has played guitar in many great bands and has written a book on old-time backup guitar. John sings harmony. They offer a generous 18 selections on this, their first CD.

    Read more: SUNNY MOUNTAIN SERENADERS - INTO THIN HAIR


    TITLE: SHAKIN' DOWN THE ACORNS

    ARTIST: RED SQUIRREL CHASERS

    LABEL: VIGORTONE

    RELEASE DATE: 2015

    By Steve Goldfield

    Red Squirrel Chasers - Shakin Down The AcornsThe Red Squirrel Chasers first formed about a decade ago to play dances. Now, they have combined their formidable talents into this new recording of 16 tunes and songs. The four members of the band are fiddler Stephanie Coleman, mandolinist Jim Collier, guitarist Jim Nelson, and bass player Dedo Norris. All four sing, though Collier and Nelson sing all the leads and most of the harmony. Their musical interests span the genres of old-time music and early bluegrass.

    Read more: RED SQUIRREL CHASERS - SHAKIN' DOWN THE ACORNS


    TITLE: SORROWS AND GLORIES

    ARTIST: RED MOON ROAD

    LABEL: SELF

    RELEASE DATE: SEPT. 11, 2015

    By Jackie Morris

    Sorrows and Glories - Red Moon RoadOne of the most exciting folk groups to come out of Canada in recent years, Red Moon Road brings an irresistible blend of energy, charm, story-telling, and musical virtuosity to their songs that makes you want to hear them again and again. With wonderful melodies punctuated by spot-on harmonies and upbeat rhythms, their second album, Sorrows and Glories, is as refreshingly original as it is inviting; as ideal for careful listening as it is for just driving in your car and not minding the traffic so much.

    Read more: RED MOON ROAD - SORROWS AND GLORIES


    TITLE: HURRY UP AND WAIT

    ARTIST: DUET 2 IT

    LABEL: ET ENT.

    RELEASE DATE: 2015

    By Jackie Morris

    duet 2 itOnce, when I was at a concert, I overheard someone say (about the artist), “She could sing the telephone book and it would sound amazing.” That’s the kind of voice that Erin Montgomery brings to Duet 2 It. And her abilities are matched, on lead guitar, by her partner, Chris Roullard. Together, in Hurry Up and Wait, this young duo has created a debut album that fairly explodes with talent, vitality, and a sophistication that belies their years.

    Read more: DUET 2 IT - HURRY UP AND WAIT


    everything but ...

    CELEBRATING BLACK HISTORY MONTH

    LEAD BELLY

    Huddie William Ledbetter (January 20, 1888 – December 6, 1949) was an American folk and blues musician notable for his strong vocals, virtuosity on the twelve-string guitar, and the songbook of folk standards he introduced.

    Read more: LEAD BELLY


    FULL CALENDAR

    MUSIC       DANCE

    TODAY'S CALENDAR 2/13/16


    MUSIC


    fwpick

    6:30pm JUDY COLLINS

    The Cave

    40789 Village Dr., Big Bear Lake, CA 92315


    7:00pm OTTMAR LIEBERT & LUNA NEGRA

    The Coach House

    33157 Camino Capistrano, San Juan Capistrano, CA 92675

    949-496-8927


    7:00pm BURGAN & CHAN

    Coffee Gallery Backstage

    2029 N. Lake Ave., Altadena, CA 92675

    626-798-6236 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


    fwpick

    7:00pm MAMAK KHADEM

    The Getty Center - Harold M. Williams Auditorium

    1200 Getty Center Dr., Los Angeles, CA 90049

    310-440-7300


    fwpick

    7:30pm AARON NEVILLE QUINTET

    Broad Stage

    1310 11th St., Santa Monica, CA 90401-2000

    310-434-3200


    fwpick

    7:30pm THE T SISTERS

    Laura R. Charles Theater, Sweetwater High School

    2900 Highland Ave., National City, CA 91950

    Presented by AMSD Concerts


    fwpick

    7:30pm THE HOT SARDINES

    Segerstrom Center for the Arts – Samueli Theatre

    600 Town Center Dr., Costa Mesa, CA 92626

    714-556-2787


    fwpick

    8:00pm DENNIS G & THE ZYDECO RIDERZ

    Grand Annex

    434 West 6th St., San Pedro, CA 90731-2632

    310-833-6362


    fwpick

    8:00pm THE REVELERS

    Rusty’s Surf Ranch

    256 Santa Monica Pier, Santa Monica, CA

    310-393-PIER


    fwpick

    8:00pm MANELI JAMAL

    Boulevard Music

    4316 Sepulveda Blvd., Culver City, CA 90230

    310-398-2583


    8:00pm FUMANI THOMAS

    West Valley Music Center

    22428 Vanowen St., West Hills, CA 91307

    818-992-4142



    DANCE


    LAGUNA FOLK DANCE FESTIVAL

    Teachers: Genci Castrati (Albanian Folk Dances) and Lee Otterholt (Balkan Folk Dances)

    Music workshop with Miamon Miller.

    Ensign Intermediate School

    2000 Cliff Dr., Newport Beach, CA

    Michelle Sandler 714-891-0788 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
    Robert Altman This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


    8:00pm VIENNESE WALTZ NIGHT

    Live music, some instruction. Period dress encouraged but not required

    Samuelson Pavilion, Occidental College

    Bird Rd, Los Angeles, CA 90041

    Elizabeth Barber This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


    7:00pm VALENTINE’S SQUARE DANCE

    Ben Guzman & Kelly Marie Martin Trio

    Kagel Canyon – Dexter Park

    11053 N. Trail, Sylmar, CA 91342


    RECURRING EVENTS


    MUSIC


    1:00pm - 4:00pm HERMOSA BEACH OLD-TIME MUSIC JAM second Saturday

    Home in Hermosa Beach

    Hermosa Beach, CA 90254

    This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

    Jim Hamilton This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


    6:30pm BLUEGRASS CONCERTS every Saturday

    Me N Eds Pizza Parlor

    4115 Paramount Blvd., Lakewood, CA 90712

    562-421-8908


    6:30pm - 11:00pm SOMIS SONG CIRCLE & POTLUCK (SONGMAKERS) second Saturday

    Somis (Contact via Songmakers website)

    Somis, Somis, CA 93066

    Bill & Lana Lynch 805-910-7565 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


    6:30pm - 10:00pm MISSION HILLS SONG CIRCLE (SONGMAKERS ) second Saturday

    Mission Hills (Contact via Songmakers website)

    www.songmakers.org, Mission Hills , CA 91345

    Bobbi Gore 818-361-4535 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


    7:00pm - 10:00pm GRASSROOTS ACOUSTICA second Saturday

    Echo Park Film Center

    1200 Alvarado St., Los Angeles, CA

    90026

    Mark Isam This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


    7:30pm - 10:30pm GRATEFUL DUDES BLUEGRASS second & fourth Saturday

    Vincenzo's Pizza

    24500 Lyons Ave., Newhall, CA 91350


    7:30pm LOS ANGELES MENSA FOLKSONG SIG second Saturday

    Los Angeles Mensa Folksong SIG

    Alan Stilson 818-884-4284, Los Angeles, CA 90000

    Alan Stillson 818-884-4284 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


    DANCE


    2:00pm - 5:00pm SANTA PAULA SCANDINAVIAN DANCE second & fourth Saturday

    Briggs Elementary School

    14438 W. Telegraph, Santa Paula, CA

    Madeleine Waddell 805-604-9608 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


    6:00pm - 9:00pm SOLVANG VILLAGE FOLK DANCERS first, second, fourth & fifth Saturday

    Bethania Lutheran Parish Hall

    603 Atterdag Rd., Solvang, CA

    David Heald 805-688-3397


    6:30pm - 10:30pm BON TEMPS SOCIAL CLUB CAJUN & ZYDECO DANCERS second Saturday

    War Memorial Hall, Balboa Park

    3325 Zoo Drive, San Diego, CA


    7:30pm - 11:30pm CAFE AMAN - BALKAN DANCING second Saturday

    LA DanceFit Studio

    10936 Santa Monica Blvd., Los Angeles, CA

    Madelyn Taylor 8187853839 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


    7:30pm - 11:00pm SAN DIEGO CONTRADANCES second & fourth Saturday

    Trinity United Methodist Church

    3030 Thorn St., San Diego, CA

    619-283-8550


    8:00pm - 11:00pm 2ND SATURDAY SOUTH PASADENA CONTRADANCE second Saturday

    South Pasadena Woman's Club

    1424 Fremont Ave., South Pasadena, CA

    Steve Lewis This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


    PASSINGS

    Andy M. Stewart

    (September 8, 1952- December 27, 2015)

    Silly Wizard
    Andy M Stewart, 2nd from left with members of Silly Wizard..
    Andy M. Stewart, born in Alyth, Perthshire, Scotland, was known as the lead singer in the group Silly Wizard.

    Andy M. Stewart had been left paralyzed from the chest down after a failed operation on his spine in September 2012. He was taken into hospital in early December after suffering a stroke.

    Read more: ANDY M. STEWART


    Al Ard

    (September 19, 1946 - December 18, 2015)

    By Ed Glass and Fron Heller

    Al Ard
    Photo by Leda Shapiro
    Al Ard at Topanga Banjo-Fiddle Contest in 1998.

    Our friend Al Ard died December 18, 2015 at the age of 69.

    Only rarely did he venture far from Lennox and Inglewood. But staying local never impeded the breadth and depth of his humanity and understanding.

    Al was an unpretentious and completely unselfish mentor to everyone, perhaps most importantly in a spiritual way. He never hesitated to enthusiastically teach others whatever he knew in the realm of music: spoons, rhythm, singing, guitar, harmonica, banjo, or anything else.

    Read more: AL ARD


    GRAMMY NOMINEES

    2015 GRAMMY NOMINEES

    OF INTEREST TO FOLKWORKS READERS

    11. BEST CONTEMPORY INSTRUMENTAL ALBUM

    36. BEST GOSPEL PERFORMANCE SONG

    38. BEST GOSPEL ALBUM

    40. BEST ROOTS GOSPEL ALBUM

    44. BEST TROPICAL LATIN ALBUM

    45. BEST AMERICAN ROOTS PERFORMANCE

    46. BEST AMERICAN ROOTS SONG

    47. BEST AMERICANA ALBUM

    48. BEST BLUEGRASS ALBUM

    49. BEST BLUES ALBUM

    50. BEST FOLK ALBUM

    51. BEST REGIONAL ROOTS MUSIC ALBUM

    53. BEST WORLD MUSIC ALBUM

    54. BEST CHILDREN'S ALBUM

    66. BEST ALBUM NOTES

    67. BEST HISTORICAL ALBUM

    -->Click for DETAILS

    Read more: 2015 GRAMMY NOMINEES


    BOOK REVIEW

    TITLE: WOODY GUTHRIE L.A.—1937-1941

    AUTHORS: DARRYL HOLTER AND WILLIAM DEVERELL
    FOREWORD BY ED CRAY

    PUBLISHER: ANGEL CITY PRESS (SANTA MONICA, CA)

    PUBLICATION DATE: January 15, 2016

    A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

    By Ross Altman, PhD

    WOODY GUTHRIE L.A.1937-1941This account of Woody Guthrie’s pivotal four years in Los Angeles from 1937 to 1941—during which he became the political songwriter who influenced four generations of American folk singers—from Bob Dylan to Bruce Springsteen—will send a seismic shockwave through the standard narrative of the folk revival of the1940s, ‘50s, and ‘60s. Measured on the Richter Scale, I would put it at a 6.7—in the same territory as the 1994 Northridge earthquake.

    Read more: WOODY GUTHRIE L.A.—1937-1941


Anyone for Yiddish Tango?

By Audrey Coleman

Gustavo BulgachPut the two words “Yiddish” and “tango” together, and some might respond, “You’re joking?” But history bears out a strong connection between the two. These will be evident in the upcoming performance of Yiddish Tango Club at the Skirball Cultural Center on Thursday evening, August 21. Having investigated Vietnamese tango in my June column, this gives me yet another opportunity to dig for treasures in music history.

But first here’s the scoop on the show. Virtuoso klezmer clarinetist Gustavo Bulgach, who launched the Yiddish Tango Club project in 2012, will lead his ensemble in accompanying tangos with lyrics written in Yiddish as well as Argentine tango instrumentals from the early days of the genre and the innovative tangos of Astor Piazzolla. They also will be performing pieces from the klezmer repertoire, freilachs (happy, fast-paced numbers) and nigunim (improvised vocal numbers with roots in religious and particularly Hasidic texts and music). Along with the Bulgach on clarinet and saxophone, the multi-ethnic ensemble includes Andrew Markham on piano, Ken Rosser on guitar, Hiroo Nakano on drums, Hector Pineda on bass and Mariano Dugatkin on accordion and that tango signature instrument, the bandoneón.

Divina GloriaInterpreting the lyrics will be guest artist Divina Gloria, who, as her stage name suggests, is larger than life; I recall her vibrant vocals in a Yiddish tango-themed concert at Disney Hall’s Redcat Theater several years ago. Born Martha Gloria Goldsztern, the Argentine vocalist is equally mesmerizing interpreting traditional Yiddish songs, tangos in Spanish and Yiddish, and jazz and pop material. Her background includes numerous appearances as a dramatic actress on stage, screen, and television in Argentina since the mid-seventies. Together, Divina Gloria and Gustavo Bulgach are sure to ignite the Skirball stage. The outdoor setting will allow room for spontaneous dancing by audience members.

Now to history. The roots of Yiddish tango extend from Argentina to Western and Eastern European centers, and New York. Researcher Lloica Czackis traces its path in articles published in the Jewish Quarterly (2004) and European Judaism (2009). In her opening to the former article, she comments that tango music and Jewish folk music share the prominence of the violin as well as an indefinable sense of yearning. The Argentine tango, born in the brothels of Buenos Aires in the first decade of the 20th century, emerged at a time when the Jewish population of Argentina was beginning to swell. The East European Jews fleeing the brutal Russian pogroms of the 1880s initially resettled in North America but before the end of the century Argentina became an equally attractive destination. Thus, whereas in the 1880s there were about 1500 Jews in the entire country, by the 1920s a thriving Jewish population of mainly Ashkenazi origin had reached 200,000 in Buenos Aires alone. The Jewish community of Buenos Aires boasted a rich cultural life mainly conducted in Yiddish. But this was no ghetto. Jewish immigrants also learned Spanish and interacted in matters of business and culture with the outer society. After the tango gained status from its enthusiastic reception in Paris, Jewish musicians began playing in tango orchestras. When, thanks to the interpretive talents of Carlos Gardel, the tango became a form of passionate vocal expression, Jewish lyricists penned tangos with Spanish lyrics.

The next step was the composition and performance of tangos in Yiddish. In Eastern Europe, where tangos were already performed in Polish and Russian due to the success of the genre in Paris, Yiddish theater troupes composed their own tangos in addition to adopting the Argentine Yiddish tangos. By the 1930s, Yiddish Theater companies from both Buenos Aires and Eastern Europe were touring to New York, performing tangos and other genres to great acclaim. Some of the most popular East European tangos Czackis cites are from the Ararat Yiddish revue company of Lodz: Ikh ganve in der nakht (“I steal at night”) and Tsi darf es azoy zain? (“Must I be this way?”). Touring companies from New York, Eastern Europe, and Buenos Aires cross-pollinated creatively until the outbreak of the Second World War.

The tango has always had its dimension of emotional darkness, but the era of the Holocaust was its darkest chapter. Jewish musicians and lyricists living in Nazi-imposed ghettos in Vilna, Kovno, Lodz, Bialystok and other urban centers composed, among other songs of resistance, tangos bitterly decrying the conditions under which they struggled to survive. This also occurred in concentration camps. Most of these compositions were lost, but Shmerke Kaczerginsky collected fraction of them was and in 1948 published Lieder fun di getos und lagern (Songs from the Ghettos and Concentration Camps). More macabre still, it is documented that Nazi officers regularly ordered concentration camp orchestras, the lagernkapellen, to play tangos to accompany the marching of prisoners to their deaths. This nightmarish scenario was immortalized in the poem Todestango (Tango of Death) published by Paul Antschel in 1947.

It is amusing to hear the Yiddish tangos that emerged from Jewish communities that flourished in Buenos Aires, Europe and New York through the 1930s but also it is necessary–and I don’t know if Thursday’s performance will represent it—to acknowledge tangos that grew in the desert of despair brought on by the Holocaust. In either case, Yiddish tangos are no joke.

The Yiddish Tango Club performance officially starts at 8:00pm on Thursday, August 21 at the Skirball Cultural Center located at 2701 Sepulveda Blvd. (near Mulholland Drive exit), Los Angeles 90049. The event is free. Doors open at 7:00pm. Apparently Gustavo Bulgach will be informally sharing vintage Yiddish tango recordings between 7:00pm and 8:00pm.

Audrey Coleman-Macheret is a writer, educator, and ethnomusicologist who explores traditional and world music performed in Southern California and beyond.