TRADITIONAL IRISH MUSIC CONNECTS PEOPLE

IN UCLA, THROUGHOUT WORLD

By Andrew Warner

Reprinted With Permission From UCLA Daily Bruin

UCLA Irish Ensemble 1
Will Hammer, a third-year anthropology student, plays music in the Irish Music Ensemble at the group's meeting Thursday. Hammer said he is glad to be returning to playing Celtic and Irish tunes, which he played throughout middle school and high school after his mother sent him to a fiddle camp. (Pinkie Su/Daily Bruin).

South Africa, Germany and Japan are all located on different continents, but they have one thing in common: traditional Irish music sessions.

The sessions are informal social gatherings that take place across the world – meeting places for musicians who play traditional Irish tunes or songs at pubs, restaurants and even the Schoenberg Music Building, where UCLA’s Irish Music Ensemble meets every Thursday night.

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IN THE BEGINNING

HISTORY OF THE SANTA BARBARA OLD TIME FIDDLERS’ CONVENTION

By Peter Feldmann
Santa Barbara Old Time Fiddlers’ Convention Founder

SBOTFC CrowdThe Santa Barbara Old Time Fiddlers’ Convention, held first in 1972 at UCSB, found its causation — strangely enough — three years earlier at a rock festival held near Oakland, California at Altamont in 1969. The promoters of that festival, hoping to imitate the success of Woodstock, decided on an outdoor festival with the Rolling Stones and the Grateful Dead as headliners. To beef up security, members of the Hell’s Angeles motorcycle club were stationed on and around the stage area. During the Stone’s set, a drunk jumped on stage and was fatally stabbed by a Hell’s Angel. 

Read more: IN THE BEGINNING - HISTORY OF THE SANTA BARBARA OLD TIME FIDDLERS’ CONVENTION

FIDDLING AROUND
AT THE BERKELEY
OLD TIME MUSIC CONVENTION

By Paul Kotapish

This article was first published in San Francisco Classical Voice, Sept 5, 2017. Republished by permission.

Foghorn String Band BOTMFWhat’s in a name?

The Berkeley Old Time Music Convention suggests many possibilities for the uninitiated, but for cognoscenti, the moniker “old-time music” immediately conjures a range of traditional dance tunes and songs from the rural South and Midwest, music associated with fiddles and banjos, plaintive singing, shady porches, and barn dances.

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FOLK SCARE IN ROTTERDAM

LA’S ALLAH-LAS CONCERT CANCELLED

DATELINE: AUGUST 24, 2017 ROTTERDAM, NETHERLANDS;

SPECIAL TO FOLKWORKS

By Ross Altman, PhD

Allah-LasBad vibes in Rotterdam cancelled the cool vibes of LA folk-rock band Allah-Las’ concert. Spanish police still investigating the terrorist attack in Barcelona a week ago that killed 13 people and wounded over 100 others tipped off the Dutch police that a van wearing Spanish license plates was suspected of carrying explosives to the Rotterdam venue of Maassila where the band was scheduled to perform last night. Dutch police detained the driver and discovered a number of gas tanks in his van and after questioning him notified the venue’s manager, who cancelled the concert before it had even begun.

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SEND IN THE CLOWNS:

STEPHEN STILLS AND JUDY COLLINS

IN CONCERT AT THE SABAN THEATRE - FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 2017

By Ross Altman, PhD

Stephen Stills - Judy CollinsFor what it’s worth, it’s beginning to look like we won’t be seeing Joan Baez and Bob Dylan reuniting anytime soon; nor are Ian and Sylvia getting back together; Mimi and Richard Farina are playing only up in heaven; but down here on earth (“Where Music Meets the Soul”) at the Saban Theatre in Beverly Hills, a dream-come-true concert is planned for Friday, September 1, 2017—Stephen Stills and Judy Blue Eyes—Judy Collins. She inspired his greatest love song—Suite: Judy Blue Eyes—which leads off Crosby, Stills and Nash’ self-titled debut album in 1969—just in time for Woodstock—which was only their second concert together. Wow! Talk about perfect timing.

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BOB DYLAN’S NOBEL LECTURE:

I SHALL NOT BE RELEASED

By Ross Altman, PhD

Bob Dylan
(Wikipedia)
Bob Dylan in 1984.

The first thing you learn from the Nobel Prize web site with regard to Bob Dylan’s long-awaited and worth waiting for lecture—to fulfill the final requirement of his Nobel Prize for Literature—is that all rights are reserved and it may not be reprinted in any form, though the audio file may be embedded in other web sites—which FolkWorks has already done. But as for the text, it shall not be released. Perhaps that augurs that Dylan himself has plans to reprint it in an official form someday. (The text is reprinted in full on the Nobel Prize website, noted below. *) It is a brilliant lecture on the foundational role classic literature played in the writing of his songs, and for those who may have wondered whether his selection as the 2016 Prize recipient was worthy of the name literature—his insights into three of the literary classics he celebrates should put that question to bed once and for all. Dylan here talks in the role of a professor of literature who without question has immersed himself in the same canon of masterpieces that would be expected of any such Prize recipient. He has clearly read the classics, understood them in a profound way, and used them in ways no other modern songwriter has come close to matching. Dylan’s lecture is itself an introduction to literature.

Read more: BOB DYLAN’S NOBEL LECTURE:

PETE SEEGER AND THE POWER OF SONG: TRIBUTE TO A FOLK LEGEND

A TALE OF TWO TRIBUTES:

THE KENNEDY CENTER—SATURDAY, APRIL 15, 2017 8:00PM

THEATRICUM BOTANICUM—SATURDAY, APRIL 1, 2017 1:00PM

By Ross Altman, PhD

Pete SeegerAmerica’s Tuning Fork, folk singer Pete Seeger, was a cultural pariah long before he was a cultural hero—but you would never know it from the most recent major tribute being planned—at the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C. The artist who was blacklisted for seventeen years is in the process of being both canonized and sanitized since passing away January 27 in 2014 at the age of 94.

Take, for example, this promo description of Pete’s truncated legacy by the Kennedy Center/Grammy Museum publicity department: Pete Seeger and the Power of Song: Tribute to a Folk Legend

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CELEBRATING THE BAKERSFIELD SOUND

By Kathleen Masser

Merle HaggardMove over, BuckO, there's a new museum in town.

Bakersfield is, of course, home to the Buck Owens Crystal Palace, a music hall built by Owens in the 1990s. It also houses a restaurant, a nightclub, a bar, and the Buck Owens Museum, a collection of guitars and other memorabilia belonging to the country music hit-maker, whose career spanned more than 60 years.

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WHO WROTE COPPER KETTLE?

A Study In Disputed Authorship

By Ross Altman, PhD.

Copper KettleSometime during Prohibition—which lasted from the passage of the 18th Amendment in 1920 to its repeal with the passage of the 21st Amendment in1933—Elliot Ness and his revenuers came to a Kentucky moonshiner’s cabin in the Appalachian Mountains and knocked on the door. A young boy answered and Ness asked him if his pa was home.

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WHO WROTE COPPER KETTLE?

THE REST OF THE STORY

By Ross Altman, PhD

Throughout my research to reconcile two apparently conflicting accounts of the authorship of Copper Kettle—which I finally realized were not in conflict at all, but only two different names for the same person—and thus supported Joan Baez’s original credit of the song to Albert Frank Beddoe on her 1962 album Joan Baez in Concert—I nonetheless kept asking myself, “But if not the original author, from whom did Joan Baez learn the song?”

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RICK TURNER, HANDMADE?:“YES, NO, MAYBE AND ALWAYS”

Interview with the legendary guitar luthier at NAMM 2017

By Annette Siegal

Rick Turner at NAMM BoothThis year at NAMM I decided to focus on seeking out an instrument maker (luthier) that was more than a production line. With imports of instruments in mass numbers, and varying degrees of quality, I believe from a luthier’s wife perspective that it’s also important to retain handcrafted skills.

One such luthier is Rick Turner of Rick Turner Guitars. His remarkable story started from a small town in Massachusetts and ended up influencing the sound of many musicians / bands that are intertwined with a part of America’s musical history. He’s also a collector of Howe-Orme instruments that were coincidentally made in MA (1897-1910).

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How Did You Celebrate Martin Luther King’s Birthday?

Lisa Finnie Broadcasting Live From “The Curvaceous Slopes of California”

On The Dylan Hour and Masters of Song, 11:00am—1:00pm KCSN 88.5 FM

By Ross Altman, PhD

Bob Dylan Joan Baez and Paul Stookey
Photo by Dan Budnik
Bob Dylan, Joan Baez, and Paul Stookey at the Lincoln Memorial on August 28, 1963 for the March On Washington.

87 years after the most important moral leader of 20th Century America was born on January 15, 1929, his I Have a Dream speech from the 1963 March on Washington was played in its magnificent entirety by host Lisa Finnie to open her January 15 Dylan Hour radio broadcast on Martin Luther King’s birthday. Well, as poet e.e. cummings once wrote, “albutnotquitemost.”

Read more: How Did You Celebrate Martin Luther King’s Birthday?