• SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT

    THE NEW FOLKWORKS

    January 1, 2020 will mark FolkWorks’ 20th anniversary! We started out as a hard copy newspaper with 15k distribution, and have morphed into an online resource with over 400k hits/month! Our website offers news about artists and the arts, CD reviews and other articles of interest. FolkWorks supports mature and new talent through concerts, dances and festivals that both entertain and educate. Our Calendar has become the “go to” source for folk/roots events in SoCal. Our columnists are a resource for artists and their audiences with topics ranging from commentary to history and folk tales. The popularity of this part of our work forms the basis of an exciting new phase of FolkWorks.

    In keeping with our rapidly changing world of broader access to information, and technology that enables wider communication, our focus will be to provide a pathway for geographic expansion, interactive programming and collaborative support and exchange. To attain these goals, our plan is to:

    • grow our audience by moving to a statewide, west coast or national platform
    • develop curated access to the FolkWorks’ calendar, which will provide event and venue producers, artists, agents, teachers, and educators the ability to directly enter events. Event details could contain detailed descriptions, photos, links, maps, and calendar exports
    • continue and expand our columns as blogs, with the ability to easily add new writers
    • partner with individuals, formal and informal groups, and organizations that share our vision of a centralized source for events, featuring a variety of traditionally based folk/roots music, dance and art to a large audience.

    We want to thank all of you in the community who have made FolkWorks possible. Please support our new adventure by becoming a FolkWorks member, or renewing your current membership. We will soon have a button on the website for one-time donations.

    We welcome your thoughts, ideas and contributions as we move toward a bold New FolkWorks.

    Read more: SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT

    SPOTLIGHTS

    LILA DOWNS

    Lila Downs

    ATURDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2019 - 8:00PM
    SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2019 - 8:00PM
    John Anson Ford Amphitheatre
    2580 Cahuenga Blvd., East, Hollywood, CA 90068
    323-461-3673

    Read more: LILA DOWNS

    PASSINGS

    RIP: John Cohen

    "THE ONLY REASON I'm STICKin' Around NOW,  FOLKS,  IS to See What IN THE HECK IS GONNA Happen Next"

    (August 2, 1932 – September 16, 2019)

    By Steve Goldfield

    John CohenI first saw John Cohen and the New Lost City Ramblers in 1963 at a show at the Lambertville Music Circus in New Jersey. At the time, they were touring heavily and Mike Seeger didn't even remember the venue when I asked him about it decades later. Tom Paley had already left the band then, largely due to the touring schedule, and Tracy Schwartz had joined the group. I still have some of their early LPs in my collection. The NLCR influenced many in my generation to learn to play instruments, especially old-time music. My earliest memory of John was his recording of Talking Hard Luck, a talking blues which derives from the 1927 recording by Chris Bouchillon called Born in Hard Luck, though only the very beginning appears in Cohen's version.

    Read more: RIP: JOHN COHEN

    COLUMN OF THE WEEK

    September-October 2019

    THE PRODUCERS

    By Dennis Roger Reed

    DennisRogerReedstudio 300dpiI sometimes produce recordings of the music of other artists. It can be very rewarding and educational. It can also be a lot like trying to jam your head into a pencil sharpener.

    All artists are different and the role of the producer is hazily defined. You may end up only holding hands with an artist that needs confidence or is dealing with recording with little or no experience. You may end up “casting” and hiring all the musicians. You may end up firing musicians chosen by the artist. You may end up deciding to never produce again. A good positive experience with a talented artist will cure most of these ills. Sometimes all an artist needs is a voice to help determine what issues are important, and which are not.

    Read more: THE PRODUCERS

    CONCERT REVIEWS

    BOB DYLAN AND HIS BAND

    AT UC IRVINE THE BREN EVENTS CENTER - OCTOBER 11, 2019, 8:00 PM

    INTIMATIONS OF MORTALITY

    By Ross Altman, PhD

    Bob Dylan at Bren

    When you think that you've lost everything

    You find out you can always lose a little more

    --Trying To Get To Heaven—Bob Dylan

    At nine minutes after 8:00pm Bob Dylan and his five-man band walked out on the stage of the Bren Events Center at UC Irvine and picked up his guitar. We were already in strange territory, and the concert hasn’t even begun. I haven’t seen Dylan play guitar in over five years—piano only these days, the only instrument in his photograph—he clearly had an opening statement to make. Especially since he only played it that one time all night.

    Read more: BOB DYLAN AND HIS BAND

    LEO KOTTKE IN CONCERT

    SMOTHERS THEATRE AT THE LISA SMITH WENGLER CENTER FOR THE ARTS (PEPPERDINE UNIVERSITY) - OCTOBER 10, 2019~8:00pm

    ROCK ON TOUR

    By Ross Altman, PhD

    Leo Kottke“The single greatest influence on finger-style guitarists…It’s the cat’s pajamas.”  --Don Ross

    Raconteur extraordinaire and finger-style guitarist par excellence Leo Kottke held forth for an hour and a half last night, dazzling his enthralled listeners with stories and songs and instrumentals on six and 12-string acoustic guitars. In between he told amazing tales of the late great Leon Redbone and the hole in his trombone case, the cartoonist’s worst nightmare Flattop and propane tanks, the siege of Vicksburg, his third grade teacher, and his uncle Irv Funk. 

    Read more: LEO KOTTKE IN CONCERT

    DANIEL NORGREN AND BAND

    AT THE TERAGRAM BALLROOM - OCTOBER 8, 9:00pm

    FOLK-ROCK’S ANSWER TO INGMAR BERGMAN

    By Ross Altman, PhD

    DANIEL NORGREN AND BANDSwedish singer-songwriter Daniel Norgren wound up his three-week tour of North America in Los Angeles last night at the Teragram Ballroom 1234 West 7th Street downtown. The 36 year-old folk rocker and his rockin’ four-piece band gave a splendid two hour and 15 minute performance. He opened the show on piano and switched to electric guitar after three songs, then went back and forth.

    Read more: DANIEL NORGREN AND BAND

    Hardly Strictly Bluegrass Festival 2019

    By Kathleen Masser

    HSB19 CopyWarren Hellman loved bluegrass music. A banjo picker himself, he wanted to share his passion with the community, so in 2001 he invited a handful of artists -- Emmylou Harris, Alison Kraus, the Road Oilers and others -- to join him in San Francisco's Golden Gate Park , on an October Saturday. He called the concert Strictly Bluegrass, and a few thousand people showed up. Admission was free.

    He did it again the following year, and the next. Crowds grew larger and musicians of other genres wanted to take part. In 2004, he loosened the boundaries around musical styles and added "Hardly" to the name.

    Read more: HARDLY STRICTLY BLUEGRASS FESTIVAL 2019

    JOHN PRINE IN CONCERT

    THE JOHN ANSON FORD AMPHITHEATRE - OCTOBER 1, 2019~8:00 PM

     “CARAVAN OF FOOLS”

    By Ross Altman, PhD

    John PrineAfter surviving two bouts of cancer, two-time Grammy winner John Prine has had his share of hard luck and hard times. And yet he never says a word about it. Because the hard times he writes about make those pale in comparison:

    His brains were on the sidewalk, and blood was on his shoes,

    (Six O’clock News) was the second song from his first album—with the aching refrain—

    Come on baby, spend the night with me.

    Read more: JOHN PRINE IN CONCERT

     

    FULL CALENDAR

    MUSIC       DANCE

    TODAY'S CALENDAR 10/21/19


    DANCE


    NO EVENTS TODAY


    RECURRING EVENTS


    MUSIC


    7:00pm - 8:30pm SDBS BLUEGRASS SLOW JAM LEARNING SESSION

    third Monday

    Our Savior Lutheran Church

    4011 Ohio St, San Diego, CA

    This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


    7:30pm - 10:30pm BROMBIES BLUEGRASS

    every Monday

    Viva Rancho Cantina

    900 Riverside Dr., Burbank, CA 91506

    818-845-2425

    Jo Ellen Doering 323-874-0213 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


    7:30pm - 9:30pm OC CELTIC JAM

    every Monday

    Peace Lutheran Church

    18542 Vanderlip Ave, Santa Ana, CA

    Heidi Halbur This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


    8:00pm - 11:00pm BASC BLUEGRASS NIGHT

    third Monday

    Viva Rancho Cantina

    900 Riverside Dr., Burbank, CA 91506

    818-845-2425


    8:30pm - 11:00pm CELTIC ARTS CENTER IRISH MUSIC SESSION

    every Monday

    Celtic Arts Center @ The Mayflower Club

    11110 Victory Blvd., North Hollywood, CA

    818-760-8322 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


    9:00pm - 10:30pm CELTIC ARTS CENTER SLOW PLAY IRISH MUSIC SESSION

    every Monday

    Celtic Arts Center @ The Mayflower Club

    11110 Victory Blvd., North Hollywood, CA

    818-760-8322 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


    DANCE


    10:00am - 11:30am ROBERTSON FOLK DANCE

    every Monday

    Robertson Recreation Center

    1641 Preuss Rd., Los Angeles, CA

    310-278-5383


    10:45am - 1:00pm UNIVERSITY OF JUDAISM

    every Monday

    UNIVERSITY OF JUDAISM

    5600 Mulholland Dr, Los Angeles, CA

    Natalie Stern 818-343-8009


    7:00pm - 10:00pm CLAREMONT ISRAELI DANCERS

    every Monday

    Claremont Masonic Lodge

    272 West 8th St., Claremont, CA

    Yael Steinfeld 909-921-7115 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


    7:00pm - 11:30pm SAN DIEGO ISRAELI DANCERS

    every Monday

    Infinity Sport Dance Center

    4428 Convoy St., San Diego, CA

    Yoni Carr 760-631-0802 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


    7:15pm - 8:45pm SIERRA FOLK DANCERS

    every Monday

    Temple City Christian Church

    9723 Garibaldi Ave., Temple City, CA

    Ann Armstrong 626-893-0303


    7:30pm - 9:30pm SAN DIEGO FOLK DANCERS

    every Monday

    Balboa Park Club

    2150 Pan American Plaza, San Diego, CA

    Jean Cate 858-278-4619 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


    7:30pm - 9:30pm SANTA MONICA ISRAELI DANCING

    every Monday

    Beth Shir Sholom

    1827 California Ave., Santa Monica, CA

    David Katz 323 466-3411 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


    7:30pm TARZANA ISRAELI DANCING

    every Monday

    MATI Center

    19626 Ventura Blvd., Tarzana, CA

    Sagi Azran


    7:45pm - 10:45pm WEST LOS ANGELES FOLK DANCERS

    every Friday

    Brockton School

    1309 Armacost Ave., West Los Angeles, CA

    Beverly Barr 310-202-6166 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


    8:00pm - 11:00pm SWEDISH FOLK DANCE CLUB OF LOS ANGELES

    every Monday

    Skandia Hall

    2031 East Villa St., Pasadena, CA

    Norman and Jane Kindig 714-777-4036 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


    8:00pm - 9:30pm SIERRA MADRE FOLK DANCE CLASS

    every Monday

    Sierra Madre Recreation Building

    611 E. Sierra Madre Blvd, Sierra Madre, CA

    Ann Armstrong 626-358-5942


    9:00pm - 11:00pm INTERNATIONAL FOLK DANCE CLUB AT UCLA

    every Monday

    UCLA Ackerman Student Union Building - 2nd Floor Lounge Room

    Westwood, CA

    310-284-3636 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

    INTERVIEW

    A Conversation with The Storytellers’ Storyteller

    By Michael Garcia and FolkWorks

    Storytellers

    In 2018, The Storytellers, the self-described “indie-folk band,” burst onto the LA music scene seemingly out of nowhere. After only one year together, they appeared on stages of some of the larger clubs in Los Angeles, as well as regional music festivals including a career defining performance last week at the Huck Finn Jubilee. Lauded by the L.A. Weekly and by legendary folk music promoter Bob Stane, we sat down with the manager of The Storytellers to get the inside story of this fast-rising roots band. And what a story it is …

    Read more: A CONVERSATION WITH THE STORYTELLERS’ STORYTELLER

    CD REVIEWS

    Song of Time: Two Folk Classics from Art and Paul Are Reissued for First Time

    By Joe Marchese

    (Reprinted with permission of The Second Disc)

    Art and Paul Hangin Drinkin and StuffWith a recent pair of reissues, Sony Music/Legacy Recordings has transported listeners to Greenwich Village at the dawn of the 1960s, when guitar-wielding troubadours took the stages at venues like Café Wha? to share their own “alternative” music: folk. While Connie Francis, Brian Hyland, Elvis Presley, and even Percy Faith were ascending to the top of the Pop chart, folksingers were spinning their own musical yarns that didn’t involve teenage romance or itsy bitsy teenie weenie yellow polkadot bikinis. Two such artists were Art and Paul – no, not that Art and Paul, but rather Messrs. Podell and Potash, signed to Columbia Records roughly three years before those other guys with the same first names. Legacy has reissued Art and Paul’s two Columbia long-players, Songs of Earth and Sky (1960) and Hangin’, Drinkin’ and Stuff (1961) to digital service providers (streaming and download) for the first time. Recorded at Columbia’s 30th Street studio with renowned engineers Frank Laico and Roy Halee, these stereo albums are intimate, immediate time capsules back to this long-gone era.

    Read more: SONG OF TIME: TWO FOLK CLASSICS FROM ART AND PAUL ARE REISSUED FOR FIRST TIME

    Artist: THE SUSIE GLAZE NEW FOLK ENSEMBLE

    Title: LIVE AT MCCABE’S

    Label: Hilonesome Music

    Release Date: September 1, 2019

    By Ernest Troost

    Susie Glaze Live at McCabes The Susie Glaze New Folk Ensemble Live at McCabe’s, Susie’s tenth album, was recorded at the venerable folk venue McCabe’s Guitar Shop in Santa Monica. Sound engineer Wayne Griffith knows this room exceedingly well and captured the evening’s magic beautifully. The mixing and mastering by Frank Rosato add the final polish.

    Read more: THE SUSIE GLAZE NEW FOLK ENSEMBLE - LIVE AT MCCABE’S

    ARTIST: Sarah Rogo

    TITLE: Smoke and Water

    LABEL: Funzalorecords

    RELEASE DATE: September 13, 2019

    By Art Podell

    SARAH ROGO Smoke and WaterSarah Rogo showed up recently at a round table jam group I play with. John S. who hosts our group had spotted her in the parking lot of the place we jam. She was carrying a guitar case, so he invited her to join us. Makes sense, right? Our group is a weekly gathering of friends who play old-time standards on fiddles, mandolins, guitars and banjos just for the fun of it. After a few turns around the circle, we asked Sarah if she’d like to perform something on her own. She agreed happily, sat forward in her chair, tucked her chin in, closed her eyes, cradled her National guitar, and proceeded to mesmerize us with a passionate blues, dancing the beat with her bare feet, while the glass slide-bar on her left little finger whined the changes.

    Read more: SARAH ROGO-SMOKE AND WATER

How to Tell the Real Bob Dylan

In Concert at the Shrine Auditorium - June 16, 2016

By Ross Altman, PhD

Bob DylanStately, skinny Bob Dylan came from the stairhead, bearing a metal harmonica rack on which an acoustic Gibson guitar and “G” harp lay crossed. He opened with The Times, They Are A-Changing. But this was fifty-three ago, 1963, at the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium. This evening, at the Shrine Auditorium, he enters with a white, broad-brimmed hat reinforced with white coat and steps up to the microphone in front of a five-piece band with the opening strains of his Oscar-winning song, Things Have Changed.

How to Tell the Real Bob Dylan

In Concert at the Shrine Auditorium - June 16, 2016

By Ross Altman, PhD

Bob DylanStately, skinny Bob Dylan came from the stairhead, bearing a metal harmonica rack on which an acoustic Gibson guitar and “G” harp lay crossed. He opened with The Times, They Are A-Changing. But this was fifty-three ago, 1963, at the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium. This evening, at the Shrine Auditorium, he enters with a white, broad-brimmed hat reinforced with white coat and steps up to the microphone in front of a five-piece band with the opening strains of his Oscar-winning song, Things Have Changed.

Every Dylan concert one goes to is a tableau of memorable images as well as a symphony of sound. This one begins on Jefferson Ave., around the corner from the entrance to the Shrine Auditorium. There are five humongous tour buses spread out over the entire block, with one right in front of the side door entrance to the back stage. A buzzing crowd of post-sixties fans is lined up in front and around it like a scene straight out of D.A. Pennebaker’s classic 1966 documentary Don’t Look Back—where every time Dylan was spotted in the back seat of a car in London there was an immediate flock of young moths drawn to a flame—straining to get a peak behind the sunglasses—into the flaming mind of the artist who wrote Desolation Row, Ballad of a Thin Man and Like a Rolling Stone.

Fifty years later and the mystery endures. Anywhere he is spotted, or even imagined he might be, crowds of onlookers gather ever hopeful for a glimpse. I wait as long as I dare, and would have waited for the doors to open, except that I know there is an opening act, and I am working for FolkWorks to cover the concert, not just a fan among many; so reluctantly at 7:30pm, I had to round the corner and go into the Shrine to see the performer whose father Dylan had once asked for his daughter’s hand in marriage.

And that’s when it hits me—this isn’t just any concert night—this is June 16—Bloomsday to Joyce fans around the world—the date that the 20th Century’s greatest novelist James Joyce met his Nora in Dublin in 1904—and the corresponding date on which his entire masterpiece Ulysses takes place. Who better therefore to stand in for Molly Bloom—the fictional Nora—based on the real Penelope from Homer’s original Odyssey of Ulysses’ ten-year journey home to Ithaca than Mavis Staples? She is the perfect—the resounding and full-throated “Yes!” to Dylan’s equally powerful “No, no, no It Ain’t Me Babe—it ain’t me you’re looking for, Babe.” Call it Homer’s “Bringing It All Back Home,” anticipating Dylan’s fourth album 2000 years ago, and Joyce’s modern parable from nearly a century ago. The 20th Century’s greatest songwriter meets Joyce.

It dawns on me that in terms of literary resonance I am standing in the Garden of Eden.

No sooner do I enter the nearly century-old ornate Baroque L.A. shrine (pardon the pun) to sumptuous conspicuous consumption than I spot my old friend and colleague (from different publications) Michael Simmons. I slowly approach him, catch his eye, and give him a big hug in welcome—our light of recognition in the knowledge that neither of us would miss Bob Dylan in Concert while there was still breath in our bodies. We bring each other up to date on our personal lives and then I slip away to climb the balcony stairs and find my seat. Michael wrote the LA Weekly cover story on Bob turning 70, and now we are both here with our hero—who just turned 75 May 24th .

Mavis Staples holds nothing back—a great Gospel and Soul singer who gives her all to every audience lucky enough to see and hear her—as we were. She is the irresistible force to Bob’s immovable object—who won’t let the audience just sit there and listen—she reaches out to the back row at the top of the balcony with new songs like Ben Harper’s I’ll Be Me (written for her new album), her old hits like Slippery People, and even the 1960s antiwar classic Buffalo Springfield’s For What It’s Worth. If she weren’t opening for Dylan, she would have stolen the show. The highlight of her set wasn’t even a song per se, but her passionate recounting of marching “on the Freedom highway, from Selma to Montgomery, with Dr. King.” She is still on that highway she wanted us to know, still speaking her mind, and captured us with both her commitment and her voice. Despite Bob’s seen-it-all pessimism of Things Have Changed, it was clear that did not apply to her. She is still the youthful and eternal optimist of America’s Promised Land.

Dylan—as his loyal followers now know all too well—has moved in other directions since the days when he symbolized the freedom and antiwar movements in the “Decade of Change.” He has pursued his art as a personal calling and long ago abandoned any superimposed role as “spokesman” for any cause, let alone a generation—a role he left for the taking. In as dramatic a departure from his own best-known songs as any since he became—for a few years—a born-again Christian—he has recently immersed himself in another Bible—the holy scriptures of the Great American Songbook, zeroing in on songs identified with Old Blue Eyes, Frank Sinatra. He has just released his second album of standards, Fallen Angels, (the title for which may well have come from an old Kris Kristofferson song of the same name). Except for Hoagie Carmichael’s Skylark, all were recorded by Sinatra. Dylan incorporates a generous sampling of them in tonight’s show—from Melancholy Mood to the achingly pure I’m a Fool to Want You to the plaintive Why Try to Change Me Now (from this album’s predecessor Shadows In the Night) to Irving Berlin’s heart-breaking What’ll I Do to the concert-closing sublime rendition of Johnny Mercer’s Autumn Leaves. Dylan has made these songs his own, and I almost felt as if he was singing only partly to us, and partly to Frank Sinatra in Heaven.

Dylan made clear his enormous admiration for Sinatra long before he started singing any of “his” songs. He was the final performer on the 80th birthday tribute to the Chairman of the Board—and a class act if there ever was. After the usual suspects like Tony Bennett, doing songs in Frank’s signature style, Dylan closed with a simple heartfelt tribute to the man who taught him everything he knew about the art of singing—which he boiled down to one impeccably chosen word: “phrasing.” Wow! It had nothing to do with lung power, or intonation, or sonic splendor, or a God-given mellifluous vocal instrument—it rather had to do with intelligence and meaning, conveying the fullest sense of what the song was about. In short, it was something anyone can do, if they care enough, and study and practice enough. It was a revelation. Then Dylan ended the show on a perfect note, with Restless Farewell, the last song from his The Times, They Are A-Changing album—adapted from the song he learned from the Clancy Brothers and Tommy Makem during the heyday of the Greenwich Village folk revival—The Parting Glass.

Dylan’s tribute brought tears to Sinatra’s old blue eyes. To see how he is performing Frank’s classic songs now is therefore not so much a departure as the fulfillment of his early recognition.

While not dwelling on his own 1960s and ‘70s classics Bob makes room for the timeless She Belongs to Me (“She’s got everything she needs/She’s an artist/She don’t look back”—source of the Pennebaker film title)—Tangled Up in Blue and the consummate encore, Blowing In the Wind—set to a new tune and piano arrangement. If you wonder what Dylan’s greatest song is, he has outvoted Rolling Stone’s pick of Like a Rolling Stone. Mr. D not only performs the civil rights and antiwar anthem of a generation, he has even put the ever-mysterious answer to his song’s still-haunting questions on a beautiful blanket out in the lobby hanging behind the merchandise table—selling for $75. “The answer, my friend, is blowing in the wind.”

I only wish he had made room for his other civil rights classic—and answered the request from a lone voice late in the evening—for The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll—about the black hotel maid murdered in Baltimore by the scion of privilege William Zantzinger, for which he received “a six-month sentence.” I have been thinking about this song in connection with the Stanford rapist and competitive swimmer who received exactly the same sentence by an equally clueless judge. The first line would even scan with the five-syllable “Brock Allen Turner” standing in for “William Zantzinger. That would have made the hair on the back of my neck stand on end—which was A.E. Housman’s definition of poetry. Dylan has his own Muse, however; and never veers from Her path.

But, unexpectedly and unaccountably, outside the Shrine the concert is far from over. There is an enchanting, totally freewheelin’ early Dylan impersonator holding forth—singing other songs that Bob left out of his show: It Ain’t Me, Babe, Like a Rolling Stone and Don’t Think Twice. No tour buses, no band, no sophisticated lighting, and no Frank Sinatra songs—the Bob Dylan everyone came to hear—with just a guitar and harmonica. His name is Frankie, and he is a joy to listen to. He even ends his set with the aforementioned Blowin’ In the Wind—and guess what—the tune is the same one that Bob sang on Freewheelin’. Ah, what can I say? Don’t look back.

After all the Dylan concerts I’ve attended, and reviews I’ve written, would I go see the real Bob Dylan again—the one you may have some difficulty recognizing—who no longer picks up a guitar and who keeps messing with his old tunes and even lyrics? Here is Molly Bloom’s answer at the end of Ulysses, and mine too: “Yes I said yes I will Yes.”

Saturday June 25 at 2:00pm at the Allendale Branch Library in Pasadena Ross Altman performs his tribute to the national pastime; 1130 South Marengo Ave. Pasadena, CA 91106 The Baseball Reliquarry ; free.

Los Angeles folk singer and Local 47 member Ross Altman has a PhD in Modern Literature; Ross may be reached at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.