Classic song performed by guys who would become rock legends

In Celebration of
Martin Luther King Day

Nina Simone singing
Ain't Got No, I Got Life

Grammy Nominee for
Best Folk Album

Silver Skies Blue by Judy Collins and Ari Hest

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Grammy Nominee for
Best American Roots Performance

Wreck You by Lori McKenna

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Grammy Nominee for
Best American Roots Performance

House of Mercy by Sarah Jarosz
Track from: Undercurrent

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HAPPY BIRTHDAY to

A.P. Carter (12/15/1891)

John Henry Hammond II (December 15, 1910 – July 10, 1987)

Rayna Gellert (12/15/1975)

Steve Forbert (12/15/1954)


Grammy Nominee for
Best American Roots Performance

The Factory Girl by Rhiannon Giddens
- live version of song from the album Factory Girl

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Grammy Nominee for
Best American Roots Performance

Mother’s Children Have a Hard Time by The Blind Boys of Alabama
- Track from God Don't Never Change: The Songs Of Blind Willie Johnson

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Grammy Nominee for
Best American Roots Performance

Ain't No Man by The Avett Brothers
- Track from True Sessions

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TOM WAITS

(born December 7, 1949)

Thomas Alan "Tom" Waits is an American singer-songwriter, composer, and actor.

Waits has a distinctive voice, described by critic Daniel Durchholz as sounding like "it was soaked in a vat of bourbon, left hanging in the smokehouse for a few months, and then taken outside and run over with a car". With this trademark growl, his incorporation of pre-rock music styles such as blues, jazz, and vaudeville, and experimental tendencies verging on industrial music, Waits has built up a distinctive musical persona. He has worked as a composer for movies and musicals and has acted in supporting roles in films, including Paradise Alley and Bram Stoker's Dracula. He also starred in Jim Jarmusch's 1986 film Down by Law. He was nominated for an Academy Award for his soundtrack work on One from the Heart.

Waits' lyrics frequently present atmospheric portraits of grotesque, often seedy characters and places, although he has also shown a penchant for more conventional ballads. He has a cult following and has influenced subsequent songwriters despite having little radio or music video support. His songs are best-known through cover versions by more commercial artists: "Jersey Girl", performed by Bruce Springsteen, "Ol' '55", by the Eagles, and "Downtown Train", by Rod Stewart. Although Waits' albums have met with mixed commercial success in his native United States, they have occasionally achieved gold album sales status in other countries. He has been nominated for a number of major music awards and has won Grammy Awards for two albums, Bone Machine and Mule Variations. In 2011, Waits was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.[3][4] He is also included among the 2010 list of Rolling Stone's 100 Greatest Singers,[5] as well as the 2015 list of Rolling Stone's 100 Greatest Songwriters of All Time.

(Wikipedia)

PATRICK SKY

Patrick Sky (born Patrick Lynch: October 2, 1943 in Liveoak Gardens, Georgia) is a musician, folk singer, and songwriter of Irish and Native American ancestry (Creek Indian). Sky was raised near the Lafourche Swamps of Louisiana).

A close contemporary of Dave Van Ronk and others in the Greenwich Village folk boom of the 1960s, following military service Sky released a number of well received albums from 1965 onwards and played with many of the leading performers of the period, particularly Buffy Sainte-Marie, Eric Andersen and the blues singer Mississippi John Hurt (whose Vanguard albums Sky produced). Sky's song "Many A Mile" became a folk club staple, and has been recorded by Sainte-Marie and others.

Becoming increasingly disillusioned with the music business and politically radical, Sky released the controversial and scabrously satirical Songs That Made America Famous in 1973 (the album was recorded in 1971 but rejected by several record companies before it found a home); to this day he claims to have received no royalties for the album. This album featured the earlier known recorded version of the song Luang Prabang, written by Sky's friend Dave Van Ronk. Patrick Sky had honed his politically charged satire in earlier albums, but Songs That Made America Famous raised the stakes. The Adelphi Records website describes how the content was, indeed, shocking; yet, how several critics encouraged the public to rush to buy these timely and brilliant "explicit lyrics" while it could. Sky gradually moved into the field of Irish traditional music, founding Green Linnet Records in 1973. Today he is recognised as an expert in building and playing the Irish uillean pipes, often performing with his wife, Cathy. He has also published several books on the subject. In 1995, Sky edited a reissued version of the important 19th-century dance tune book Ryan's Mammoth Collection and followed up in 2001 with a reissue of Howe's 1000 Jigs and Reels. (From his Wikipedia page)

TRIO MANDILI

Trio Mandli are a Georgian women trio. Their voices seamlessly harmonize together as they film themselves taking a walk. A translated Reddit comment identifies the song as originating from eastern Georgia's mountainous Khevsureti region and states the song is about a traditional courting ritual between a man and woman.

PENNYWHISTLERS

The (amazing) Pennywhistlers at Pete Seeger's Rainbow Quest (1966), singing "Shto Mi e Milo" (Macedonia)

English translation:

How I would like to have a shop

in the town of Struga,

hurry, young Kalino.

To sit by the door

and watch the young girls of Struga go by

hurry, young Kalino.

As they go to fetch water

with their colorful jugs,

hurry, young Kalino.

And meet with their friends at the well,

hurry, young Kalino.

DAVE "SNAKER" RAY

(August 17, 1943 – November 28, 2002)

DAVE "SNAKER" RAY (August 17, 1943 – November 28, 2002) was an American blues singer and guitarist from St. Paul, Minnesota, who was most notably associated with Spider John Koerner and Tony "Little Sun" Glover in the early Sixties folk revival. Together, the three released albums under the name Koerner, Ray & Glover.

DAVE "SNAKER" RAY (August 17, 1943 – November 28, 2002) was an American blues singer and guitarist from St. Paul, Minnesota, who was most notably associated with Spider John Koerner and Tony "Little Sun" Glover in the early Sixties folk revival.

GEOFF MULDAUR

(August 12, 1943)

GEOFF MULDAUR (August 12, 1943) is an American musician and a founding member of the Jim Kweskin Jug Band of Cambridge, Massachusetts; a member of Paul Butterfield's Better Days and an accomplished solo guitarist, singer, songwriter, composer, and arranger.

After establishing an impressive reputation with the Kweskin Jug Band during the 1960s, Geoff and then-wife, Maria Muldaur, recorded their first album, Pottery Pie, on Warner Bros. Records in 1969. It was on this album that Muldaur recorded his celebrated version of "Brazil" (original title "Aquarela do Brasil"), which became the title inspiration and the opening theme for Terry Gilliam's 1985 film Brazil. After recording Pottery Pie, the Muldaurs moved to the burgeoning folk, blues, and folk-rock scene in Woodstock, New York. They separated in 1972, shortly after Geoff joined Paul Butterfield's Better Days group.

After leaving the Butterfield band in 1976, Muldaur recorded two more solo albums for Warner Bros. Records, a duo album with Amos Garrett, a solo album on the Flying Fish Records label, and a jump band album, Geoff Muldaur and the Nite Lites, for Hannibal Records. During this period, Muldaur also recorded with Bobby Charles, Jerry Garcia, Eric Von Schmidt, Bonnie Raitt, and John Cale. In the early 1980s, Muldaur left the stage and recording studio for a working sabbatical. During this period, he composed scores for film and television, winning an Emmy Award, and produced albumsfor Lenny Pickett and the Borneo Horns and the Richard Greene String Quartet.

Muldaur emerged in 1998 with The Secret Handshake. After two more albums in 1999 and 2000, he recorded the semi-classical jazz album Private Astronomy, a Vision of the Music of Bix Beiderbecke on the Deutsche Grammophon label in 2003.

In 2009, Muldaur formed a roots supergroup for work on a new album. Dubbing themselves Geoff Muldaur and the Texas Sheiks, folk and American music luminary Stephen Bruton, Grammy-winning Dobro player Cindy Cashdollar, fiddle virtuoso Suzy Thompson, guitarist Johnny Nicholas, and bassist Bruce Hughes joined Muldaur in the studio for a pair of recording sessions in 2008. Bruton died in May 2009. Texas Sheiks was released on September 22, 2009, on Tradition & Moderne. His sister is the actress Diana Muldaur. His daughters Jenni Muldaur and Clare are also musicians. His daughter Dardanella Slavin is a chiropractor.

Muldaur is the author of Moles Moan, which was recorded by his friend Tom Rush. This song has been used as a theme song for many folk music radio programs, most notably by Gene Shay. [WikiPedia]

RAMBLIN' JACK ELLIOTT

(August 1, 1931)

RAMBLIN' JACK ELLIOTT (born Elliot Charles Adnopoz; August 1, 1931) is an American folk singer and performer.

Born in Brooklyn, New York to Jewish parents in 1931, he attended Midwood High School in Brooklyn and graduated in 1949. Elliott grew up inspired by the rodeos at Madison Square Garden, and wanted to be a cowboy. Encouraged instead to follow his father's example and become a surgeon, Elliott rebelled, running away from home at the age of 15 to join Col. Jim Eskew's Rodeo, the only rodeo east of the Mississippi. They traveled throughout the Mid-Atlantic states and New England. He was only with them for three months before his parents tracked him down and had him sent home, but Elliott was exposed to his first singing cowboy, Brahmer Rogers, a rodeo clown who played guitar and five-string banjo, sang songs, and recited poetry. Back home, Elliott taught himself guitar and started busking for a living. Eventually he got together with Woody Guthrie and stayed with him as an admirer and student.

"Nobody I know—and I mean nobody—has covered more ground and made more friends and sung more songs than the fellow you're about to meet right now. He's got a song and a friend for every mile behind him. Say hello to my good buddy, Ramblin' Jack Elliott." Johnny Cash, The Johnny Cash Television Show, 1969

With banjo player Derroll Adams, he toured the United Kingdom and Europe. By 1960, he had recorded three folk albums for the UK record label Topic Records. In London, he played small clubs and pubs by day and West End cabaret nightclubs at night. When he returned to the States, Elliott found he had become renowned in American folk music circles. Woody Guthrie had the greatest influence on Elliott. Guthrie's son, Arlo, said that because of Woody's illness and early death, Arlo never really got to know him, but learned his father's songs and performing style from Elliott. Elliott's guitar and his mastery of Guthrie's material had a big impact on Bob Dylan when he lived in Minneapolis. When he reached New York, Dylan was sometimes referred to as the 'son' of Jack Elliott, because Elliott had a way of introducing Dylan's songs with the words: "Here's a song from my son, Bob Dylan." Dylan rose to prominence as a songwriter; Elliott continued as an interpretative troubadour, bringing old songs to new audiences in his idiosyncratic manner. Elliott also influenced Phil Ochs, and played guitar and sang harmony on Ochs' song "Joe Hill" from the Tape from California album. Elliott also discovered singer-songwriter Guthrie Thomas in a bar in Northern California in 1973, bringing Thomas to Hollywood where Thomas' music career began.

Elliott appeared in Dylan's Rolling Thunder Revue concert tour and played "Longheno de Castro" in Dylan's movie Renaldo and Clara. In the movie, he sings the song "South Coast" by Lillian Bos Ross and Sam Eskin, from whose lyric the character's name is derived.

"My name is Longheno de Castro

My father was a Spanish grandee

But I won my wife in a card game

To Hell with those lords o'er the sea"

Elliott plays guitar in a traditional fingerpicking style, which he matches with his laconic, humorous storytelling, often accompanying himself on harmonica. His singing has a strained, nasal quality which the young Bob Dylan emulated. His repertoire includes American traditional music from various genres, including country, blues, bluegrass and folk. Elliott's nickname comes not from his traveling habits, but rather the countless stories he relates before answering the simplest of questions. Folk singer Odetta claimed that her mother gave him the name, remarking, "Oh, Jack Elliott, yeah, he can sure ramble on!" His authenticity as a folksy, down-to-earth country boy, despite being a Jewish doctor's son from Brooklyn, and his disdain for other folk singers, were parodied by the Folksmen (Christopher Guest, Michael McKean, and Harry Shearer) in the satirical documentary A Mighty Wind in the name of their "hit" album Ramblin'. A Mighty Wind also referred to a former member of the New Main Street Singers, Ramblin' Sandy Pitnick, a somewhat geeky-looking white man in a cowboy hat, apparently in parody of Elliott. Elliott's first recording in many years, South Coast, earned him his first Grammy Award in 1995. He was awarded the National Medal of Arts in 1998. His long career and strained relationship with his daughter Aiyana were chronicled in her 2000 film documentary, The Ballad of Ramblin' Jack. At the age of 75, he changed labels and released I Stand Alone on the ANTI- label, with an assortment of guest backup players including members of the Red Hot Chili Peppers. He said his intention was to title the album Not for the Tourists, because it was recorded in response to his daughter's request for songs he loved but never played in concert. When asked why he did not, he told her, "These songs are not for the tourists." In 2012 he was featured on two tracks (4, 12) on the album Older Than My Old Man Now by Loudon Wainwright III.

ALISON KRAUSS

(July 23, 1971)

ALISON MARIA KRAUSS (July 23, 1971) is an American bluegrass-country singer and musician. She entered the music industry at an early age, winning local contests by the age of ten and recording for the first time at fourteen. She signed with Rounder Records in 1985 and released her first solo album in 1987. She was invited to join the band with which she still performs, Alison Krauss and Union Station (AKUS), and later released her first album with them as a group in 1989.

She has released fourteen albums, appeared on numerous soundtracks, and helped renew interest in bluegrass music in the United States. Her soundtrack performances have led to further popularity, including the O Brother, Where Art Thou? soundtrack, an album also credited with raising American interest in bluegrass, and the Cold Mountain soundtrack, which led to her performance at the 2004 Academy Awards.

As of 2012, she has won 27 Grammy Awards from 41 nominations, tying her with Quincy Jones as the most awarded living recipient, second only to classical conductor Georg Solti, who holds the record for most wins with 31. She is the most awarded singer and the most awarded female artist in Grammy history. At the time of her first, the 1991 Grammy Awards, she was the second youngest winner (currently tied as the ninth youngest).

J. E. MAINER

(July 20, 1898 – June 12, 1971)

J. E. MAINER (July 20, 1898 – June 12, 1971) was an American old time fiddler who followed in the wake of Gid Tanner and his Skillet Lickers.

Joseph Emmett Mainer grew up on a farm in the mountains near Weaverville, North Carolina and learned to play the banjo and fiddle from an early age. Since Wade, his brother, also was interested in learning to play the banjo, he left that to Wade and concentrated on the fiddle. Soon, Mainer began performing at local country barn dances. He found work at a textile mill in Knoxville, Tennessee but moved to Concord, North Carolina in 1922 for another work in a mill.

Mainer's fame as a fiddler rose and sponsored by the Crazy Water Crystals in 1933, he and his newly formed band consisting of J. E. on fiddle, Wade Mainer on banjo, and Zeke Morris on guitar, made their radio debut on WBT in Charlotte, North Carolina calling themselves "J.E.Mainer and his Crazy Mountaineers." The band appeared on several radio stations in the following years until 1935, when they received a recording contract on. In August the same year, the Mountaineers, with the addition of "Daddy" John Love, recorded for Bluebird Records. Wade Mainer and Zeke Morris temporarily left the band in the early 1936 to form a duo. In the meantime Ollie Bunn, Howard Bumgardner and Clarence Todd replaced Wade, Zeke and "Daddy" John Love on the next recording session. In the summer of 1936, Wade and Zeke returned to record with "the mountaineers". The next year, in 1937, Wade Mainer formed the "Sons of the Mountaineers". Shortly, a new change of personnel occurred when Leonard "Lester" Stokes and George Morris became members of "the mountaineers" calling themselves "Handsome and Sambo". They added Snuffy Jenkins on banjo on the following recording session. In late 1938, Stokes and Morris were once more replaced by Clyde Moody and Jay Hugh Hall. The band continued to perform on radio stations in both North and South Carolina.

The Mountaineers disbanded at the outbreak of World War II, but Mainer continued to record in the late 1940s, together with his sons, Glenn and Curly, for King Records. Between 1967 and 1971, the year of his death, literally hundreds of post-war recordings were released on Rural Rhythm Records. Mainer will be inducted into the North Carolina Music Hall of Fame on October 11, 2012.

BENTON FLIPPEN

(July 18, 1920– June 28, 2011)

James Benton Flippen(July 18, 1920– June 28, 2011) was an old-time fiddler from Mount Airy, North Carolina. He was one of the last surviving members of a generation of performers born in the early 20th century playing in the Round Peak style centering on Surry County, North Carolina. His contemporaries included Tommy Jarrell, Fred Cockerham, Kyle Creed, and Earnest East.

Flippen learned to play old-time music early in life from his father, uncles, and brothers. He composed several original tunes and performed with the Camp Creek Boys and the Smokey Valley Boys.

Flippen was a recipient of theNorth Carolina Folk Heritage Award in 1990.

Flippen gained popularity among the old-time music community for his unique approach to fiddling. Having rather large hands, he discovered the best way to get around the neck was to slide his index and middle fingers, rather than fingering up and down the scale with all four fingers as most people do— including his mentor, Esker Hutchins. On some tunes, he slid up the neck with one finger as he nearly simultaneously slid down with another. Where most fiddlers make a "D" chord on the neck with the index and ring finger, Flippen did it with index and middle finger. His bowing was described as smooth and heavily shuffled, having been perfected over many years of playing for square dances. As Paul Brown describes in the liner notes to Old Time, New Times, "It cries the blues, shouts a spiritual message, resounds with the celebration of a square dance or house party. It's full of syncopation and stretch, yet solidly down-to-earth."

Flippen also had a unique two-finger banjo style. He said he found it difficult to play clawhammer banjo, and though he liked hearing it, the three-finger bluegrass style wasn't quite for him, so he came up with his own heavily syncopated two-finger picking style that combined drive and charm.

"WOODY" GUTHRIE

(July 14, 1912 – October 3, 1967)

Woodrow Wilson "WOODY" GUTHRIE (July 14, 1912 – October 3, 1967) was an American singer-songwriter and musician whose musical legacy includes hundreds of political, traditional, and children's songs, along with ballads and improvised works. He frequently performed with the slogan This machine kills fascists displayed on his guitar.

His best-known song is "This Land Is Your Land". Many of his recorded songs are archived in the Library of Congress. Songwriters such as Bob Dylan, Phil Ochs, Johnny Cash, Bruce Springsteen, Robert Hunter, Harry Chapin, John Mellencamp, Pete Seeger,Andy Irvine, Joe Strummer, Billy Bragg, Jerry Garcia, Jay Farrar, Bob Weir, Jeff Tweedy, Bob Childers, Sammy Walker and Tom Paxton have acknowledged Guthrie as a major influence.

Many of his songs are about his experiences in the Dust Bowl era during the Great Depression when he traveled with displaced farmers from Oklahomato California and learned their traditional folk and blues songs, earning him the nickname the "Dust Bowl Troubadour." Throughout his life Guthrie was associated with United States Communist groups, though he was seemingly not a member of any.

Guthrie was married three times and fathered eight children, including American folk musician Arlo Guthrie. Guthrie died from complications ofHuntington's disease, a progressive genetic neurological disorder. During his later years, in spite of his illness, Guthrie served as a figurehead in the folk movement, providing inspiration to a generation of new folk musicians, including mentor relationships with Ramblin' Jack Elliott and Bob Dylan.

JOHN JORGENSON

(July 6, 1956)

JOHN JORGENSON (July 6, 1956) is an American musician. Although best known for his guitar work with bands such as the Desert Rose Band and The Hellecasters. Jorgenson is also proficient in the mandolin, mandocello, Dobro, pedal steel, piano, upright bass, clarinet,bassoon, and saxophone. While a member of the Desert Rose Band, Jorgenson won the Academy of Country Music's "Guitarist of the Year" award two consecutive years.

Jorgenson has also recorded or toured with many artists including Elton John, The Byrds, Bob Dylan, Bob Seger, Willie Nelson, Johnny Cash,Emmylou Harris, Hank Williams Jr., Barbra Streisand, Luciano Pavarotti, Roy Orbison, Patty Loveless, Michael Nesmith, and Bonnie Raitt. [Wkipedia]

MISSISSIPPI JOHN HURT

(July 3, 1893, or March 8, 1892 – November 2, 1966)

John Smith Hurt, better known as MISSISSIPPI JOHN HURT (July 3, 1893, or March 8, 1892 – November 2, 1966) was an American country blues singer and guitarist. Raised in Avalon, Mississippi, Hurt taught himself how to play the guitar around age nine. He worked as a sharecropper and began playing at dances and parties, singing to a melodious fingerpicked accompaniment.

His first recordings, made for Okeh Records in 1928, were commercial failures, and he continued to work as a farmer. Tom Hoskins, a blues enthusiast, located Hurt in 1963 and persuaded him to move to Washington, D.C., where he was recorded by the Library of Congress in 1964. This helped further the American folk music revival, which had led to the rediscovery of many other bluesmen of Hurt's era.

Hurt performed on the university and coffeehouse concert circuit with other Delta blues musicians brought out of retirement. He also recorded several albums for Vanguard Records.

Hurt died in Grenada, Mississippi. Material recorded by him has been re-released by many record labels, and his songs have been recorded by Bob Dylan, Dave Van Ronk, Jerry Garcia, Beck, Doc Watson, John McCutcheon, Taj Mahal, Bruce Cockburn, David Johansen, Bill Morrissey, Gillian Welch,Josh Ritter, Guthrie Thomas, Parsonsfield, and Rory Block.

DAVE VAN RONK

(June 30, 1936 – February 10, 2002)

David Kenneth Ritz "Dave" Van Ronk (June 30, 1936 – February 10, 2002) was an American folk singer. An important figure in the American folk music revival and New York City's Greenwich Village scene in the 1960s, he was nicknamed the "Mayor of MacDougal Street".

Van Ronk's work ranged from old English ballads to blues, gospel, rock, New Orleans jazz, and swing. He was also known for performing instrumentalragtime guitar music, especially his transcription of "St. Louis Tickle" and Scott Joplin's "Maple Leaf Rag". Van Ronk was a widely admired avuncular figure in "the Village", presiding over the coffeehouse folk culture and acting as a friend to many up-and-coming artists by inspiring, assisting, and promoting them. Folk performers whom he befriended include Bob Dylan, Tom Paxton, Patrick Sky, Phil Ochs, Ramblin' Jack Elliott, and Joni Mitchell. Bob Dylan recorded Van Ronk's arrangement of the traditional song "House of the Rising Sun" on his first album, which The Animals turned into a chart-topping rock single in 1964, helping inaugurate the folk-rock movement.

Van Ronk received a Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP) in December 1997. He died in a New York hospital of cardiopulmonary failure while undergoing postoperative treatment for colon cancer.

LESTER FLATT

(June 19, 1914 – May 11, 1979)

LESTER RAYMOND FLATT (June 19, 1914 – May 11, 1979) was a bluegrass guitarist and mandolinist, best known for his collaboration with banjo picker Earl Scruggs in The Foggy Mountain Boys (popularly known as "Flatt and Scruggs").

Flatt's career spanned multiple decades, breaking out as a member of Bill Monroe's band during the 1940s and including multiple solo and collaboration works exclusive of Scruggs. He first reached a mainstream audience through his performance on "The Ballad of Jed Clampett", the theme for the network television hit The Beverly Hillbillies, in the early 1960s.

Flatt was born in Duncan's Chapel, Overton County, Tennessee, to Nannie Mae Haney and Isaac Columbus Flatt. A singer and guitarist, he first came to prominence as a member of Bill Monroe's Blue Grass Boys in 1945. In 1948 he started a band with fellow Monroe alumnus Earl Scruggs, and for the next twenty years Flatt and Scruggs and the Foggy Mountain Boys were one of the most successful bands in bluegrass. When they parted ways in 1969, Flatt formed a new group, the Nashville Grass, hiring most of the Foggy Mountain Boys. His role as lead singer and rhythm guitar player in each of these seminal ensembles helped define the sound of traditional bluegrass music. He created a role in the Bluegrass Boys later filled by the likes of Jimmy Martin, Mac Wiseman, Peter Rowan and Del McCoury.

His rich lead voice is unmistakable in hundreds of bluegrass standards.

He is also remembered for his library of compositions. The Flatt songbook looms titanic for any student of American acoustic music. He continued to record and perform with that group until his death in 1979 of heart failure, after a prolonged period of ill health. Flatt was posthumously inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1985 with Scruggs. He was posthumously made an inaugural inductee into the International Bluegrass Music Hall of Honor in 1991. His hometown of Sparta, Tennessee, held a bluegrass festival in his honor for a number of years, before being discontinued a few years prior to the death of the traditional host, resident Everette Paul England; Lester Flatt Memorial Bluegrass Day is part of the annual Liberty Square Celebration held in Sparta. Flatt and Scruggs were ranked No. 24 on CMT's 40 Greatest Men of Country Music in 2003. They performed "The Ballad of Jed Clampett", which was used as the theme for the television show The Beverly Hillbillies. [Wikipedia]

NATHAN ABSHIRE

(June 27, 1913 – May 13, 1981)

NATHAN ABSHIRE (June 27, 1913 – May 13, 1981) was an American Cajun accordion player who, along with Iry LeJeune, was responsible for the renaissance of the accordion in Cajun music in the 1940s.

Learning the accordion at age six, he was influenced by his father, mother, and uncle all playing the accordion. Abshire first performed on the accordion in public at age eight. He continued playing at dance halls and parties through his teenage years. In the 1930s, he performed with and learned from fiddler Lionel Leleux and accordionist Amédé Ardoin. In 1935, he recorded six songs with the Rayne-Bo Ramblers, a group led by guitarist and singer Leroy "Happy Fats" Leblanc.

Abshire served in the U.S. military during World War II. After the war, he settled in Basile, Louisiana, where he played regularly at the Avalon Club. He released his best-known record, "Pine Grove Blues", in 1949, a song based on Amede Breaux's "Le Blues de Petit Chien", as well as several recordings on Swallow Records and Arhoolie Records in the 1960s. He appeared with Dewey Balfa and The Balfa Brothers at the Newport Folk Festival in 1967. Along with Balfa, Abshire devoted much of his time in the 1960s and 70s to promoting Cajun music through appearances at festivals, colleges, and schools throughout the United States.

Abshire was featured in Les Blank's 1971 documentary Spend It All and the 1975 PBS documentary, The Good Times Are Killing Me.He was also included in the documentary film, Les Blues de Balfa, along with Balfa.

He died in Basile, Louisiana in 1981 after living most his life there as the overseer of the town dump.

JACKIE DALY

(June 22, 1945)

JACKIE DALY (June 22, 1945) is an Irish button accordion and concertina player. He has been a member of a number of prominent Irish traditional-music bands, including De Dannan, Patrick Street, Arcady, and Buttons & Bows.

Born and raised in the area known as Sliabh Luachra, Jackie Daly is one of the foremost living exponents of the distinctive music of that region.B Among his early musical influences were his father, a melodeon (one-row accordion) player, and local fiddler Jim Keeffe, under whose tutelage he began playing at "crossroads dances".

After working in the Dutch merchant navy for several years, Daly decided to become a professional musician on returning to Ireland in the early 1970s. In 1974 he won the All-Ireland Accordion Competition in Listowel, County Kerry. To qualify, he was obliged to play a B/C instrument, at the time the only system sanctioned by the competition organizers, but immediately afterwards returned to his chosen C#/D system. In 1977, his first solo recording was released by Topic

Records of London as volume 6 of their Music from Sliabh Luachra series. Jackie Daly's musical career is notable for partnerships with several fiddlers, beginning with Séamus Creagh. Their 1977 album, Jackie Daly agus Séamus Creagh, brought Sliabh Luachra music to a wider audience and, with its tight unison playing, set the standard for future accordion and fiddle recordings.

Another influential partnership has been with Kevin Burke, on whose 1978 recording If the Cap Fits he made a guest appearance, and with whom he made another highly regarded fiddle-accordion duet album, Eavesdropper (1981).

Jackie Daly was the first of a series of accordionists with De Dannan, appearing on four of their albums between 1980 and 1985. It was his work with this band that is thought by many to have paved the way for the accordion to become a concert-stage, rather than principally a dance-band, instrument in Irish music.

In 1986 Daly joined Patrick Street, a band that Burke was forming with Andy Irvine and Arty McGlynn, and with whom Daly played until 2007. In the intervening years Daly recorded three albums with fiddlers Séamus and Manus McGuire, as Buttons & Bows. He also collaborated with fiddler Máire O'Keeffe, notably on the album Re-Joyce: Tunes and Songs from the Joyce Collection (2003).

In 2005 Jackie Daly was named Ceoltóir na Bliana (Musician of the Year) in the Gradam Ceoil awards of the Irish-language television station TG4.

In 2009 Topic Records included in their 70-year anniversary boxed set Three Score and Ten The Rising Sun/The Pope's Toe from Jackie Daly - Music from Sliabh Luachra Vol. 6 as track one of the third CD.

In 2010, Daly and fiddler Matt Cranitch released The Living Stream, a recording of chiefly Sliabh Luachra music, followed by Rolling On in 2014.

EDDIE ADCOCK

(June 21, 1938)

EDDIE ADCOCK (born June 21, 1938 in Scottsville, Virginia) is an American banjoist and one of the true innovators in the five-string banjo pantheon.

His professional career as a 5-string banjoist began in 1953 when he joined Smokey Graves & His Blue Star Boys, who had a regular show at a radio station in Crewe, Virginia. Between 1953-57, he floated between different bands. Bill Monroe offered a job to Adcock in 1957, and he played with the Blue Grass Boys until Monroe had to let him go because the band simply wasn't earning enough money to employ him. Adcock returned to working day jobs, but that was short-lived. After he started working in a sheet metal factory, Jim Cox, John Duffey, and Charlie Waller asked him to join their new band, The Country Gentlemen. Adcock performs almost exclusively with his wife Martha and calls Lebanon, Tennessee his home. Eddie belongs to a number of business organizations, including IBMA and the Folk Alliance. He has served on the Board of Directors of the Tennessee Banjo Institute.

He and Martha also created and ran (off and on) Adcock Audio, a large, state-of-the-art sound company until 2006. [Wikipedia]

DAVID BREWER & REBECCA LOMNICKY IN BAD CAR ACCIDENT

From David: I like to stay upbeat on here, but I have to say I'm thankful to be alive--yesterday at this time, Rebecca Lomnicky and myself were crashed into head-on at high speed quite seriously by a drunk driver (whom was arrested)... My car (The Subaru, not the mighty green Geo) was completely totaled--we were both wearing seat belts and the airbags deployed and saved us, so the brave Subaru did its job...we were not completely unscathed however; quite scraped, burned, and twisted, but thankfully nothing seems broken or punctured. We are quite shaken up about it & so glad it wasn't worse-- we are just laying low and recovering today, but please do send good vibes--thanks! Thanks to Pete & Lynda Haworth for taking care of us in the aftermath.. Hope y'all are well... I'll be in touch soon

FIRST BLUEGRASS MUSIC FESTIVAL

HAPPY BIRTHDAY

BOB DYLAN

(May 24, 1941)


Topanga Banjo Fiddle Header

TOPANGA BANJO-FIDDLE CONTEST WINNERS

Band

1. The Blue Grass Hoppers, Los Angeles

2. New Roads, Reseda

3. Fiddlers of Troy, Santa Monica

4. Honorable Mention: Acoustic Shadow Band, Los Angeles

Traditional Banjo - Advanced

1. Scott Linford, Los Angeles

2. Andy Roberts, Mariposa

3. Josh Gurney, Los Angeles

4. Honorable Mention: Ken Leiboff, San Jose

Traditional Banjo - Intermediate

1. Miles Young, Oakland

2. Milena Reed, Culver City

3. Doug Newman, Santa Monica

Traditional Banjo - Beginning

1. Rosy Nolan, Los Angeles

2. Ashley Atkinson, Los Angeles

3. Patrick Thuss, La Canada

Bluegrass Banjo - Advanced

1. Casey James Holmberg, Los Angeles

2. Mason Unthank, Santa Clarita

3. Dennis Nowack, San Diego

4. Honorable Mention: Gary Laskowski, Simi Valley

Bluegrass Banjo - Intermediate

1. Richard Dodge, Huntington Beach

2. Aaron Wardell, Marlow, NH

3. Heidi Lindblom , Huntington Beach

Bluegrass Banjo - Beginning

1. Tyler Goldstein, Torrance

2. Jackie Preciado, Los Angeles

3. Piper Keesee, Toluca Lake

Fiddle - Advanced

1. Nathaniel Copeland, Julian, CA

2. Jesse Olema, Sherman Oaks

3. Grant Wheeler, Los Angeles

4. Honorable Mention: Anya Sturm, Santa Monica

Fiddle - Intermediate

1. Stephanie Nagler, Los Angeles

2. Ellie Kroskrity, Venice

3. Georgia Pike, San Pedro

Fiddle - Beginning

1. Sophie Yera, Santa Monica

2. Henry Sullivan, Santa Monica

3. Charlotte Bradley-McKinnon, Pasadena

Mandolin - Advanced

1. Kirby Cool, Oakland

2. Roland Sturm, Santa Monica

Mandolin - Intermediate

1. Anya Sturm, Santa Monica

2. Mary Zangerle, Moorpark

3. Doug Newman, Santa Monica

Mandolin - Beginning

1. Emily Unthank, Santa Clarita

2. Claire Masters, Valencia

Flat-Picking Guitar - Advanced

1. Jonah Warschaw, Woodland Hills

2. Cory McClintic, Los Altos

3. Bob Schetter, Tehachapi

Flat-Picking Guitar - Intermediate

1. Mark Humphrey, Santa Monica

2. Ryan McLaughlin, Alaska

3. John Drake, Fountain Valley

Flat-Picking Guitar - Beginning

1. Matthew St. Claire, Bakersfield

2. Piper Keesee, Toluca Lake

3. Rachael Koscelnick, Bell Canyon

Finger-Style Guitar

1. Pete Steinberg, Los Angeles

2. Jonah Warschaw, Woodland Hills

3. Douglas Newman, Santa Monica

4. Honorable Mention: Jill Fenimore, Los Angeles

Other Instruments

1. Ken Leiboff, San Jose [Harmonica]

2. Chris Teuber, Venice [Harmonica]

3. Terry Okey, Los Angeles [Slide Dobro Guitar]

4. Honorable Mention: Pedro Arevalo, Malibu [Dobro]

Singing

1. Leeann Skoda, Los Angeles

2. The Gazelles and Friends, Los Angeles

3. Skylar Keesee, Toluca Lake

4. Honorable Mention: Machine Gun Housewives, Santa Monica

Best Backup Instrument

1. Simon Petty, unknown [Guitar]

2. Larry Schallert, Canyon Country [Guitar]

3. Ken Leiboff, San Jose [Guitar]

Flatfoot Dancing - Youth (12 & under)

1. Harmony Svetska, Oxnard

2. Eden Perryman, Ventura

3. Rae Low, Los Angeles

Flatfoot Dancing - Young Adult (13 - 30)

1. Afton Coombs, Los Angeles

2. Olivia Warren, Moorpark

3. Danielle Hernandez, Simi Valley

Flatfoot Dancing - Adult (31 - 65)

1. Aedan MacDonnell, Sierra Madre

2. Evelyn Eisele, Santa Rosa Valley

3. Craig Schoenbaum, Culver City

Flatfoot Dancing - Senior (66 & up)

1. Hap Palmer, Woodland Hills

2. Pat Arnold, Torrance

Oldest Musician

Stan Shapin (1937), Orange - Advanced Traditional Banjo

Youngest Musician

Rae Low (2009), Los Angeles - Flatfoot Dancing (Youth)

RIP

GUY CLARK

(November 6, 1941 – May 17, 2016)

Guy Charles Clark (November 6, 1941 – May 17, 2016) was a Grammy Award winning American Texas country and folk singer, musician, songwriter, recording artist, and performer. He has released more than twenty albums, and his songs have been recorded by other artists including Jerry Jeff Walker, Jimmy Buffett, Lyle Lovett, Ricky Skaggs, Steve Wariner, and Rodney Crowell. Guy Clark won the 2014 Grammy Award for Best Folk Album: My Favorite Picture Of You.

Clark was born in Monahans, Texas, and eventually settled in Nashville, where he helped create the progressive country and outlaw country genres. His songs "L.A. Freeway" and "Desperados Waiting for a Train" that helped launch his career were covered by numerous performers. The New York Timesdescribed him as "a king of the Texas troubadours", declaring his body of work "was as indelible as that of anyone working in the Americana idiom in the last decades of the 20th century."

[Wikipedia][Website]

DICK GAUGHAN

(May 17, 1948)

DICK GAUGHAN (May 17, 1948, Glasgow) is a Scottish musician, singer, and songwriter, particularly of folk and social protest songs.

Gaughan took up the guitar at the age of seven. Although he later sang in Scottish Gaelic, he is not fluent in that language; he does, however, have a powerful command of Scots. Gaughan sang in Edinburgh folk clubs and became a professional musician in 1970, playing mainly traditional songs on an acoustic guitar. He now writes his own songs as well as performing those of others. Although his approach to performing focuses on the words to the songs, Gaughan is also known as a master of the acoustic guitar. An example of his purely instrumental work is Coppers and Brass (1977).

Gaughan has many and various influences. In his guitar playing one can detect the influence of Doc Watson, Davy Graham and Bert Jansch, but he also claims to have been influenced by musicians as diverse as Hank Williams and Seán Ó Riada. His songs have been recorded by Billy Bragg, Mary Black, Jessica Haines & Mark Kaiser and Capercaillie amongst many others. He has also recorded extensively as a session musician.

Gaughan's interest in composition and orchestration has led to two orchestral commissions from the prestigious Celtic Connections festival: Timewaves (Lovesong to a People's Music) in 2004 and, in 2007, his first symphonic work, Treaty 300, a musical examination of the effects of the Treaty of Union of 1707 on Scottish culture composed for the inaugural concert of the Celtic Connections Youth Orchestra.

[Wikipedia][Website]

BIRCH MONROE

(May 16, 1901 – 1982)

BIRCH MONROE (May 16, 1901 – 1982) was a notable early bluegrass fiddler, bassist, founding member of the Monroe brothers, and older brother to Bill Monroe. Birch, along with his brother Charlie left the Monroe family farm in Rosine, Kentucky in the 1920s to work in the booming northern factories of the time. When Bill joined them in 1929 they were working in East Chicago at the Sinclair Oil refinery. There, the brothers played local venues and dances. Birch, with his brothers played on WAE in Hammond and also performed weekly on WJKS in Gary. In 1932, Birch, Charlie, and Bill, along with a friend, Larry Moore, were hired as exhibition square dancers for the national barn dance radio program, broadcast from Chicago. In 1934, Birch chose the stability of working at the refinery to support his sisters while Charlie and Bill went on to perform on KFNF in Shenandoah, Iowa.

Birch later joined Bill in 1946 on a recording session in Chicago; a session that included Earl Scruggs. Birch sang bass on the gospel number "Wicked Path of Sin." Birch would play bass on tour with Bill after Howard Watts left the band. Birch Monroe was also manager, in the early 1960s, of Bill Monroe's country music park, the Brown County Jamboree, in Bean Blossom, Indiana.

CLIFF CARLISLE

(May 6, 1903 – April 5, 1983)

CLIFF CARLISLE (May 6, 1903 – April 5, 1983) was an American country and blues singer. Carlisle was a yodeler and was a pioneer in the use of the Hawaiian steel guitar in country music. He was a brother of country music star Bill Carlisle.

Carlisle was born in Taylorsville, Kentucky and began performing locally with cousin Lillian Truax at age 16. Truax's marriage put an end to the group, and Carlisle began playing with Wilber Ball, a guitarist and tenor harmonizer. The two toured frequently around the U.S. playing vaudeville and circus venues in the 1920s.

Carlisle and Ball first played at Louisville, Kentucky radio station WHAS-AM in 1930, which made them local stars, and later that year they recorded forGennett Records and Champion Records. In 1931, they recorded with Jimmie Rodgers. Toward the end of 1931, Carlisle signed with ARC and was offered performance slots on several radio stations, including WBT-AM in Charlotte, North Carolina, WLS-AM in Chicago and WLW-AM in Cincinnati, Ohio. Cliff's brother Bill Carlisle became his guitarist after Ball left in 1934. During the 1930s Carlisle, who recorded a large amount of material despite a hiatus from 1934 to 1936, frequently released songs with sexual connotations including barnyard metaphors (which became something of a hallmark).

Carlisle toured with his son, "Sonny Boy Tommy," to occasional consternation from authorities in areas where this contravened local child labor laws. He continued to perform on WMPS-AM in Memphis, Tennessee for several years in the 1940s, but by the 1950s had retired from music. In the 1960s, The Rooftop Singers covered his tune "Tom Cat Blues"; in its wake, Carlisle and Ball did a few reunion shows together and recorded for Rem Records. On April 2, 1983, Carlisle died at the age of 79 in Lexington, Kentucky. [WikiPedia]

APPEARING AT L.A. OLD TIME SOCIAL

May 12-14 2016

APPEARING AT L.A. OLD TIME SOCIAL

May 12-14 2016

Check out Roland Sturm's column on Seattle's Canote Brothers.

Check out David Bragger's column for more detail about the Old Time Social Workshops and more...

THEODORE BIKEL

(May 2, 1924 – July 21, 2015)

THEODORE MEIR BIKEL (May 2, 1924 – July 21, 2015) was an Austrian-American Jewish actor, folk singer, musician, composer, and activist.

He made his stage debut in Tevye the Milkman in Tel Aviv, Israel, when he was in his teens. He later studied acting at Britain's Royal Academy of Dramatic Art and made his London stage debut in 1948 and in New York in 1955. He was also a widely recognized and recorded folk singer and guitarist. In 1959 he co-founded the Newport Folk Festival and created the role of Captain von Trapp opposite Mary Martin as Maria in the original Broadway production of Rodgers & Hammerstein's The Sound of Music. In 1969 Bikel began acting and singing on stage as Tevye in the musical Fiddler on the Roof, a role he performed more often than any other actor to date. The production won nine Tony Awards and was one of the longest-running musicals in Broadway history.

Bikel was president of the Associated Actors and Artistes of America and was president of Actors' Equity in the late 1970s and early 1980s. He served as the Chair of the Board of Directors of Partners for Progressive Israel,[3] where he also lectured.

REVEREND GARY DAVIS

(April 30, 1896 – May 5, 1972)

REVEREND GARY DAVIS, also Blind Gary Davis (April 30, 1896 – May 5, 1972), was an African-American bluesand gospel singer and guitarist, who was also proficient on the banjo, guitar and harmonica. His fingerpicking guitar style influenced many other artists. His students include Stefan Grossman, David Bromberg, Roy Book Binder, Larry Johnson, Nick Katzman, Dave Van Ronk, Rory Block, Ernie Hawkins, Larry Campbell, Bob Weir,Woody Mann, and Tom Winslow. He influenced Bob Dylan, the Grateful Dead, Wizz Jones, Jorma Kaukonen, Keb' Mo', Ollabelle, Resurrection Band, and John Sebastian (of the Lovin' Spoonful).

The folk revival of the 1960s invigorated Davis's career. He performed at the Newport Folk Festival. Peter, Paul and Mary recorded his version of "Samson and Delilah", also known as "If I Had My Way", a song by Blind Willie Johnson, which Davis had popularized. "Samson and Delilah" was also covered and credited to Davis by the Grateful Dead on the album Terrapin Station. Eric Von Schmidt credited Davis with three-quarters of Schmidt's "Baby, Let Me Follow You Down", covered by Bob Dylan on his debut album for Columbia. Blues Hall of Fame singer and harmonica player Darrell Mansfield has recorded several of Davis's songs. [ WikiPedia ]

"MA" RAINEY

(c. April 26, 1886 – December 22, 1939)

"MA" RAINEY (born Gertrude Malissa Nix Pridgett; c. April 26, 1886 – December 22, 1939) was one of the earliest known American professional blues singers and one of the first generation of such singers to record. She was billed as The Mother of the Blues.

She began performing as a young teenager (between the ages of 12 and 14), and performed under the name Ma Rainey after she and Will Rainey were married in 1904. They toured with the Rabbit Foot Minstrels and later formed their own group called Rainey and Rainey, Assassinators of the Blues. From the time of her first recording in 1923 to five years later, Ma Rainey made over 100 recordings, including "Bo-weevil Blues" (1923), "Moonshine Blues" (1923), "See See Rider Blues" (1924), "Black Bottom" (1927), and "Soon This Morning" (1927).

Ma Rainey was known for her very powerful vocal abilities, energetic disposition, majestic phrasing, and a ‘moaning’ style of singing. Her powerful voice was never adequately captured on her records, due to her recording exclusively for Paramount, which was at the time known for its below-average recording techniques and poor shellac quality. However, Rainey's other qualities are present and most evident in her early recordings, "Bo-weevil Blues" and "Moonshine Blues".

Rainey recorded with Louis Armstrong in addition to touring and recording with the Georgia Jazz Band. She continued to tour until 1935 when she retired to her hometown.

WADE MAINER

(April 21, 1907 – September 12, 2011)

WADE ECHARD MAINER (April 21, 1907 – September 12, 2011) was an American country singer and banjoist. With his band, the Sons of the Mountaineers, he is credited with bridging the gap between old-time mountain music and Bluegrass and is sometimes called the "Grandfather of Bluegrass." In addition, he innovated a two-finger banjo fingerpicking style, which was a precursor to modern three-finger bluegrass styles.

Originally from North Carolina, Mainer's main influences came from the mountain music of his family. In a career that began in 1934 and spanned almost six decades, Mainer transitioned from being a member of his brother's band into the founder of his own ensemble, the Sons of the Mountaineers, with whom he performed until 1953, when he became more deeply involved with his Christianity and left the music industry. After working at a General Motors factory and attending gospel revivals, Mainer was convinced that he should restart his career as a Christian gospel musician and began to tour with his wife in this capacity. He continued to release albums until 1993. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=

MAC BENFORD

(April 18, 1940)

MAC BENFORD has been a leading figure in the preservation and performance of traditional Appalachian stringband music for more than forty years. He began playing clawhammer banjo in 1960, while a student at Williams College. His interest in the authentic mountain styles of playing the 5-string led him to the greatest living masters of the time - players like Wade Ward, Kyle Creed, Tom Ashley, and Roscoe Holcomb who would provide life-long inspiration and models in the formation of his own style.

Moving to California’s Bay Area in 1967, Mac began his professional performing career with the much-beloved Dr. Humbead’s New Tranquility Stringband and Medicine Show.This group specialized in the re-creation of the old-time music captured on 78 rpm records from the 1920s, most especially that of Charlie Poole and the North Carolina Ramblers. The band played festvals (rock and folk), clubs, coffeehouses up and down the West Coast, before it disbanded in 1970.

In that year, Mac began playing with Walt Koken and Bob Potts as the Fat City Stringband. Honing their skills on the street corners of San Francisco and old-time fiddler’s conventions in Virginia and North Carolina, the three finally settled in New York State’s Finger Lakes area, and there became the nucleus of the now-legendary Highwoods Stringband. Their innovative sound, combining authentic renditions of the tunes and songs from bygone days with the driving power of the competition-oriented string music of the '70s, knocked the old-time world on its ear and provided a brand new model for the stringband revival.It was written that “more than any other band of their time, they were responsible for drawing a legion of new,young fans into old-time music by the force of their musicianship and the fact that they were having such a good time at it.”

TOULOUSE ENGELHARDT

(April 14, 1951)

TOULOUSE ENGELHARDT, (born April 14, 1951, Milwaukee, Wisconsin) is an acoustic guitarist, recording artist, and was the last member of the Takoma Seven. The Takoma Seven was a group of finger style guitarists who recorded for Takoma Records from 1959-1976. Both John Fahey and Leo Kottke were his label mates. It was this group of finger style guitarists that brought about a subsequent resurgence in the acoustic guitar movement that is still evidenced today. During his career, Engelhardt has been noted for his work by Guitar Player Magazine in their Reader's Poll nomination for Best Acoustic Finger Style Guitarist. He was the Silver Medal Winner of the Winter Equinox Award at the Virgin Island Film Festival. He was also awarded Best Jazz Artist at the Orange County Music Awards and is listed in the 100 Most Distinguished Guitarists of 2011.

RAVI SHANKAR

(April 7, 1920 – 11 December 2012)

RAVI SHANKAR, born Rabindra Shankar Chowdhury (Bengali), his name often preceded by the title Pandit ('Master'), was an Indian musician and a composer of Hindustani classical music. He was one of the best-known exponents of the sitar in the second half of the 20th century and influenced many other musicians throughout the world.

Shankar was born to a Bengali family in India, and spent his youth touring India and Europe with the dance group of his brother Uday Shankar. He gave up dancing in 1938 to study sitar playing under court musician Allauddin Khan. After finishing his studies in 1944, Shankar worked as a composer, creating the music for the Apu Trilogy by Satyajit Ray, and was music director of All India Radio, New Delhi, from 1949 to 1956.

In 1956 he began to tour Europe and the Americas playing Indian classical music and increased its popularity there in the 1960s through teaching, performance, and his association with violinist Yehudi Menuhin and Beatles guitarist George Harrison. His influence on the latter helped popularize the use of Indian instruments in pop music throughout the 1960s. Shankar engaged Western music by writing compositions for sitar and orchestra, and toured the world in the 1970s and 1980s. From 1986 to 1992, he served as a nominated member of Rajya Sabha, the upper chamber of the Parliament of India. He continued to perform up until the end of his life. In 1999, Shankar was awarded India's highest civilian honour, the Bharat Ratna. [Wikipedia]

DAVE SWARBRICK

(born April 5, 1941)

DAVE SWARBRICK (born 5 April 1941) is an English folk musician and singer-songwriter. He has been described by Ashley Hutchings as 'the most influential [British] fiddle player bar none' and his style has been copied or developed by almost every British, and many world folk violin players who have followed him.[1] He was one of the most highly regarded musicians produced by the second British folk revival, contributing to some of the most important groups and projects of the 1960s, and he became a much sought-after session musician, which has led him throughout his career to work with many of the major figures in folk and folk rock music.

His work for the group Fairport Convention from 1969 has been credited with leading them to produce their seminal album Liege and Lief (1969) which initiated the electric folk movement. This, and his subsequent career, helped create greater interest in British traditional music and was highly influential within mainstream rock. After 1970 he emerged as Fairport Convention's leading figure and guided the band through a series of important albums until its disbandment in 1979. Since then he has played in a series of smaller, acoustic units and engaged in solo projects which have maintained a massive output of recordings, a significant profile and have made a major contribution to the interpretation of traditional British music.

MUDDY WATERS

(April 4, 1913 – April 30, 1983)

McKinley Morganfield (April 4, 1913 – April 30, 1983), known by his stage name MUDDY WATERS, was an American blues musician who is often cited as the "father of modern Chicago blues". Muddy Waters grew up on Stovall Plantation near Clarksdale, Mississippi, and by age seventeen was playing the guitar at parties, emulating local blues artists Son House and Robert Johnson.[4] He was recorded in Mississippi by Alan Lomax for the Library of Congress in 1941.[5][6] In 1943, he moved to Chicago with the hope of becoming a full-time professional musician, eventually recording, in 1946, first for Columbia Records and then for Aristocrat Records, a newly formed label run by brothers Leonard and Phil Chess.

In the early 1950s, Muddy and his band, Little Walter Jacobs on harmonica, Jimmy Rogers on guitar, Elgin Evans on drums and Otis Spann on piano, recorded a series of blues classics, some with bassist/songwriter Willie Dixon, including "Hoochie Coochie Man", "I Just Want to Make Love to You" and "I'm Ready". In 1958, Muddy headed to England, helping to lay the foundations of the subsequent blues boom there, and in 1960 performed at theNewport Jazz Festival, recorded and released as his first live album, At Newport 1960.

Muddy's influence is tremendous, not just on blues and rhythm and blues but on rock and roll, hard rock, folk, jazz, and country; his use of amplification is often cited as the link between Delta blues and rock and roll.

BILL ROBINSON

Amazing Step Dancing

Inspired by an interview with Brian Seibert, dance critic for the New York Times and author of What the Eye Hears: A History of Tap Dancing. "Magisterial, revelatory, and-most suitably-entertaining, What the Eye Hears offers an authoritative account of the great American art of tap dancing. Brian Seibert, a dance critic for The New York Times, begins by exploring tap's origins as a hybrid of the jig and clog dancing from the British Isles and dances brought from Africa by slaves. He tracks tap's transfer to the stage through blackface minstrelsy and charts its growth as a cousin to jazz in the vaudeville circuits and nightclubs of the early twentieth century. Seibert chronicles tap's spread to ubiquity on Broadway and in Hollywood, analyzes its decline after World War II and celebrates its rediscovery and reinvention by new generations of American and international performers. In the process, we discover how the history of tap dancing is central to any meaningful account of American popular culture. This is a story with a huge cast of characters, from Master Juba (it was probably a performance of his in a Five Points cellar that Charles Dickens described in American Notes for General Circulation) through Bill Robinson and Shirley Temple, Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers, and Gene Kelly and Paul Draper to Gregory Hines and Savion Glover. Seibert traces the stylistic development of tap through individual practitioners, vividly depicting dancers both well remembered and now obscure. And he illuminates the cultural exchange between blacks and whites over centuries, the interplay of imitation and theft, as well as the moving story of African-Americans in show business, wielding enormous influence as they grapple with the pain and pride of a complicated legacy.What the Eye Hears teaches us to see and hear the entire history of tap in its every step."

The book is available on Amazon

MEL LYMAN

(March 24, 1938 – March 1978)

Melvin James Lyman (March 24, 1938 – March 1978) was an American musician, writer, and founder of the Fort Hill Community, which has been variously described as a family, commune, or cult. Lyman grew up in California and Oregon. As a young man, he spent a number of years traveling the country and learning harmonica and banjo from such musicians as Brother Percy Randolph and Obray Ramsey.

During a period in the early 1960s, Lyman lived in New York City, where he associated with other artists, filmmakers, musicians and writers. An example of which was his friendship with underground filmmaker Jonas Mekas, which led to the studios of Andy Warhol and Bruce Conner. He learned the art of filmmaking from Conner and made some films with him.

In 1963 Lyman joined Jim Kweskin’s Boston-based jug band as a banjo and harmonica player. Lyman, once called "the Grand Old Man of the 'blues' harmonica in his mid-twenties", is remembered in folk music circles for playing a 20 minute improvisation on the traditional hymn "Rock of Ages" at the end of the 1965 Newport Folk Festival to the riled crowd streaming out after Bob Dylan’s famous appearance with an electric band. Some felt that Lyman, primarily an acoustic musician, was delivering a wordless counterargument to Dylan’s new-found rock direction. Irwin Silber, editor of Sing Out Magazine, wrote that Lyman’s "mournful and lonesome harmonica" provided "the most optimistic note of the evening."

p class="fwtitle">CHANGÜÍ

Traditional Cuban music

CHANGÜÍ is a style of Cuban music which originated in the early 19th century in the eastern region ofGuantánamo Province, specifically Baracoa. It arose in the sugar cane refineries and in the rural communities populated by slaves. Changüí combines the structure and elements of Spain's canción and the Spanish guitarwith African rhythms and percussion instruments of Bantu origin. Changüí is considered a predecessor of son montuno (the ancestor of modern salsa), which has enjoyed tremendous popularity in Cuba throughout the 20th century.

Many people confuse changüi with other styles, but academically you are playing changüí is once the ensemble consists of these 4 musical instruments: marímbula, bongo, tres, güiro (or guayo) and a singer(s). So it isn't really the patterns syncopation, but rather the ensemble style.

Changüí is related to the other regional genres of nengón and kiribá. It actually is a descendant of nengón. The changüi ensemble consists of: marímbula, bongos, tres ("Cubanized" guitar), güiro (or guayo) and one or more singers. Changüi does not use the Cuban key pattern (or guide pattern) known as clave. The tres typically plays offbeat guajeos (ostinatos), while the guayo plays on the beat.

BASCOM LAMAR LUNSFORD

(March 21, 1882 - September 4, 1973)

BASCOM LAMAR LUNSFORD (March 21, 1882 - September 4, 1973) was a lawyer, folklorist, and performer of traditional (folk and country) music from western North Carolina. He was often known by the nickname "Minstrel of the Appalachians."

Bascom Lamar Lunsford was born at Mars Hill, Madison County, North Carolina in 1882, into the world of traditional Appalachian folk music. At an early age, his father, a teacher, gave him a fiddle, and his mother sang religious songs and traditional ballads. Lunsford also learned banjo and began to perform at weddings and square dances.

After qualifying as a teacher at Rutherford College, Lunsford taught at schools in Madison County. In 1913, Lunsford qualified in law at Trinity College, later to become Duke University. He began to travel and collect material at the start of the 20th century, often meeting singers on isolated farms. Lunsford has been quoted as saying he spent "nights in more homes from Harpers Ferry to Iron Mountain than God."

Lunsford gave lectures and performances while dressed in a starched white shirt and black bow tie. This formal dress was part of his campaign against the stereotyping of “hillbillies.”

In 1922 Frank C. Brown, a song collector, recorded 32 items on wax cylinders from Bascom. In 1928, Lunsford recorded "Jesse James" and "I Wish I Was a Mole In the Ground" for the Brunswick record label. Harry Smith included "Mole" on his Anthology of American Folk Music in 1952. Smith's anthology also includes Lunsford's performance of the gospel song "Dry Bones", recorded in 1928.

Lunsford played in a style from Western North Carolina, which had a rhythmic up-stroke brushing the strings. It sounds similar to clawhammer banjo playing, which emphasises the downstroke. He also played a "mandoline", an instrument with mandolin body and a five-string banjo neck. He occasionally played fiddle for dance tunes such as "Rye Straw". He censored himself, avoiding obscene songs or omitting verses. His repertoire included Child Ballads, negro spirituals and parlor songs. A CD collection of Lunsford's recordings, from the Brunswick recordings of the 1920s to the recordings for the Archive of American Folk Song at the Library of Congress in 1949, Ballads, Banjo Tunes and Sacred Songs of Western North Carolina, was released by Smithsonian Folkways Records in 1996.

HAPPY ST. PADDY'S DAY WEEK

TOMMY PEOPLES

DE DANNAN (originally Dé Danann) is an Irish folk music group. They were formed by Frankie Gavin (fiddle), Alec Finn (guitar, bouzouki), Johnny "Ringo" McDonagh (bodhrán) and Charlie Piggott (banjo) as a result of sessions in Hughes's Pub in An Spidéal, County Galway, subsequently inviting Dolores Keane (vocals) to join the band. The late fiddler Mickey Finn is also acknowledged to have been a founder member.

They named themselves Dé Danann after the legendary Irish tribe Tuatha Dé Danann. In 1985, they changed the spelling of the group from "Dé Danann" to "De Dannan" for reasons that have never been made clear. However, since 2010, Finn & McDonagh have recorded and performed with a line-up named "De Danann", and, since 2012, Gavin has recorded and performed with another line-up named "De Dannan".

HAPPY ST. PADDY'S DAY WEEK

TOMMY PEOPLES

TOMMY PEOPLES (born 1948) is an Irish fiddler who plays in the Donegal fiddle tradition. He was born near St. Johnston, County Donegal, in Ireland. He has been a member of well-known traditional Irish music groups, including 1691 and The Bothy Band as well as performing solo since the late 1960s. He plays in the unique fiddle style of East Donegal.

After moving to Dublin in the 1960s, where he was employed as a Garda (member of the Irish police force), he subsequently moved to County Clare and married Mary Linnane, daughter of Kitty Linnane, long-time leader of the Kilfenora Céilí Band. He now resides in his home village of St Johnston. His daughter Siobhán Peoples is a noted fiddler in her own right.

Tommy Peoples is currently the Traditional Musician In Residence at The Balor Arts Centre, Ballybofey, County Donegal.[citation needed]

In July 2015 he launched his self-published book "Ó Am go hAm - From Time to Time". The book combines a fiddle tutor by Tommy, along with illustrations by himself and a complete notation of 130 original tunes by Tommy, again notated by himself. The book also includes many stories and incidents from his life, and musical career. The book is currently available direct from Tommy from his own website

HAPPY ST. PADDY'S DAY WEEK

TÉADA

THE CHIEFTAINS are a traditional Irish band formed in Dublin in November 1962, by Paddy Moloney, Sean Potts and Michael Tubridy. The band had their first rehearsals at Moloney's house, with Tubridy, Martin Fay and David Fallon. Their sound, which is almost entirely instrumental and largely built around uilleann pipes, has become synonymous with traditional Irish music and they are regarded as having helped popularise Irish music across the world.

Paddy Moloney came out of Ceoltóirí Chualann, a group of musicians who specialised in instrumentals, and sought to form a new band. The group remained only semi-professional up until the 1970s and by then had achieved great success in Ireland and the United Kingdom. In 1973, their popularity began to spread to the United States when their previous albums were released there by Island Records. They received further acclaim when they worked on the Academy Award-winning soundtrack to Stanley Kubrick's 1975 film Barry Lyndon, which triggered their transition to the mainstream in the US.

The group continued to release successful records throughout the 1970s and 1980s, and their work with Van Morrison in 1988 resulted in the critically acclaimed album Irish Heartbeat. They went on to collaborate with many other well-known musicians and singers; among them Luciano Pavarotti, the Rolling Stones, Madonna, Sinéad O'Connor and Roger Daltrey. The band have won six Grammys during their career and they were given a Lifetime Achievement Award at the prestigious BBC Radio 2 Folk Awards in 2002. Some music experts have credited The Chieftains with bringing traditional Irish music to a worldwide audience, so much so that the Irish government awarded them the honorary title of 'Ireland's Musical Ambassadors' in 1989. In 2012, they celebrated their 50th anniversary with the release of their most recent record Voice of Ages.

HAPPY ST. PADDY'S DAY WEEK

TÉADA

TÉADA, an Irish band, plays traditional music. Téada is Gaelic for "strings". The five members of the band are fiddle player Oisín Mac Diarmada, button accordion player Paul Finn, Damien Stenson performs on flutes and various whistles, Seán Mc Elwain switches between the bouzouki and guitar and bodhrán player Tristan Rosenstock.

In 2001, through an appearance on the Irish television series, Flosc, Téada first came to national attention. When their eponymous debut album Téada was released the The Irish Times lauded the band for "keeping the traditional flag flying at full mast," and Scotland's Edinburgh Evening News wrote, "If there is a better new band on the Emerald Isle, they must be very, very good."

RICHARD FARIÑA

(March 8, 1937 – April 30, 1966)

RICHARD FARIÑA (March 8, 1937 – April 30, 1966) was an American folksinger, song writer, poet and novelist. Born in Brooklyn, New York, of Cuban and Irish descent, he grew up in the Flatbush neighborhood of Brooklyn and attended Brooklyn Technical High School. He earned an academic scholarship to Cornell University, starting as an engineering major, but later switching to English. While at Cornell he published short stories for local literary magazines and for national periodicals, including Transatlantic Review and Mademoiselle. Fariña became good friends with Thomas Pynchon,David Shetzline, and Peter Yarrow while at Cornell. He was suspended for alleged participation in a student demonstration against campus regulations and although he later resumed his status as a student, he ultimately dropped out in 1959, just before graduation. Ascent on Greenwich Village folk scene.

Back in Manhattan, Fariña became a regular patron of the White Horse Tavern, the well-known Greenwich Village tavern frequented by poets, artists, and folksingers, where he befriended Tommy Makem. It was there that he met Carolyn Hester, a successful folk singer. They married eighteen days later. Fariña appointed himself Hester's agent; they toured worldwide while Fariña worked on his novel and Carolyn performed gigs. Fariña was present when Hester recorded her third album at Columbia studios during September 1961, where a then-little-known Bob Dylan played harmonica on several tracks. Fariña became a good friend of Dylan's; their friendship is a major topic of David Hajdu's book, Positively 4th Street: The Lives and Times of Joan Baez, Bob Dylan, Mimi Baez Fariña, and Richard Fariña.

Fariña then traveled to Europe, where he met Mimi Baez, the teenage sister of Joan Baez, in the spring of 1962. Hester divorced Fariña soon thereafter, and Fariña married 17-year-old Mimi in April 1963. Thomas Pynchon was the best man. They moved to a small cabin in Carmel, California, where they composed songs with a guitar and Appalachian dulcimer. They debuted their act as "Richard & Mimi Fariña" at the Big Sur Folk Festival in 1964 and signed a contract with Vanguard Records. They recorded their first album, Celebrations for a Grey Day, in 1965, with the help of Bruce Langhorne, who had previously played for Dylan. During the brief life of Richard Fariña, the couple released only one other album, Reflections in a Crystal Wind, also in 1965. A third album, Memories, was issued in 1968, after his death.

Fariña, like Dylan and others of this time, was considered a protest singer, and several of his songs are overtly political. Several critics have considered Fariña to be a major folk music talent of the 1960s. ("If Richard had survived that motorcycle accident, he would have easily given Dylan a run for his money." – Ed Ward).

His best-known songs are, "Pack Up Your Sorrows" and "Birmingham Sunday", the latter of which was recorded by Joan Baez and became better known after it became the theme song for Spike Lee's film, 4 Little Girls, a documentary about the 16th Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham, Alabama, in 1963. At the time of his death, Fariña also was producing an album for his sister-in-law, Joan Baez. She ultimately decided not to release the album, however, though two of the songs were included on Fariña's posthumous album, and another, a cover version of Fariña's "Pack Up Your Sorrows", co-written by Fariña with the third Baez sister, Pauline Marden, was released as a single in 1966; it has since been included in a number of Baez' compilation albums.

On April 27, 1968, Fairport Convention recorded a live version of "Reno Nevada" for French TV programme Bouton Rouge, featuring vocals by Judy Dyble and Iain Matthews. They then recorded the song for a BBC session later in the same year, this time with Dyble's replacement in the band Sandy Denny, subsequently included on the album Heyday. Denny also recorded "The Quiet Joys of Brotherhood" for her album Sandy. Matthews later recorded "Reno Nevada" and "Morgan the Pirate" for his album, "If You Saw Thro' My Eyes"; other Farina compositions appeared on subsequent solo albums and on recordings by Matthews' band, Plainsong. [Read more on Wikipedia]

Celebrating St. Paddy's Month...

PADDY CLANCY

(March 7, 1922 –November, 11 1998)

PADDY CLANCY (March 7, 1922 – November, 11 1998) was an Irish folk singer best known as a member of The Clancy Brothers and Tommy Makem. In addition to singing and storytelling, Clancy played the harmonica with the group, which is widely credited with popularizing Irish traditional music in the United States and revitalizing it in Ireland. He also started and ran the folk music label Tradition Records, which recorded many of the key figures of the American folk music revival. [Read more on Wikipedia]

RIP: TREVOR G. STUART

(August 3, 1968 - March 2, 2016)

MIRIAM MAKEBA

((March 4, 1932 –November 9, 2008 )

ZENZILE MIRIAM MAKEBA (March 4, 1932 –November 9, 2008), nicknamed Mama Africa, was a South African singer and civil rights activist.

In the 1960s, she was the first artist from Africa to popularize African music around the world. She is best known for the song "Pata Pata", first recorded in 1957 and released in the U.S. in 1967. She recorded and toured with many popular artists, such as Harry Belafonte, Paul Simon, and her former husbandHugh Masekela. Makeba campaigned against the South African system of apartheid. The South African government responded by revoking her passport in 1960 and her citizenship and right of return in 1963. As the apartheid system crumbled she returned home for the first time in 1990.

Makeba died of a heart attack on November 9, 2008 after performing in a concert in Italy organized to support writer Roberto Saviano in his stand against the Camorra, a mafia-like organization local to the region of Campania. [A lot more on Wikipedia and YouTube]

MIKE COMPTON

(February 29, 1956 )

MIKE COMPTON (born February 29, 1956 in Meridian, Mississippi) is an American bluegrass mandolin player and former protégé of the Father of Bluegrass, Bill Monroe. He is considered a modern master of bluegrass mandolin.

Compton learned music from an early age as his great-grandfather was an old-time fiddler. Initially, Compton began playing the trombone but switched to guitar instead and later to mandolin playing old-time music with his cousin. He became interested in bluegrass music and eventually learned to play like Bill Monroe. At the Bean Blossom Bluegrass Festival in 1975, he finally met Monroe. After Compton had finished his education at the Meridian Junior College he moved to Nashville and joined Hubert Davis and the Season Travelers in 1977. Four years later, in 1981, he left Davis' band. He spent the early 1980s working as a cook, a printer, and only occasionally as a musician. In the mid-1980s, he joined the Nashville Bluegrass Band but left the band in 1988 due to a road accident where bass player Mark Hembree was injured. Compton moved to the Catskill Mountains in 1991 working as a cottage caretaker. The next year, he returned to Nashville to record an album withDavid Grier. Because session work was scarce, Compton began teaching mandolin. In 1995, he recorded with Bill Monroe's Bluegrass Boys. Compton joined John Hartford in the mid 1990s recording several albums together with him. In 2000, Compton returned to the Nashville Bluegrass Band as a replacement for the mandolin player Roland White. [wikipedia]

JOHNNY "J.R." CASH

(February 26, 1932 – September 12, 2003)

JOHNNY "J.R." CASH (February 26, 1932 – September 12, 2003) was an American singer-songwriter, guitarist, actor, and author, who was widely considered one of the most influential musicians of the 20th century and one of the best-selling music artists of all time, having sold more than 90 million records worldwide. Although primarily remembered as a country music icon, his genre-spanning songs and sound embraced rock and roll, rockabilly,blues, folk, and gospel. This crossover appeal won Cash the rare honor of multiple inductions in the Country Music, Rock and Roll and Gospel Music Halls of Fame.

Cash was known for his deep, calm bass-baritone voice, the distinctive sound of his Tennessee Three backing band, a rebelliousness coupled with an increasingly somber and humble demeanor, free prison concerts, and a trademark look, which earned him the nickname "The Man in Black". He traditionally began his concerts with the simple "Hello, I'm Johnny Cash,” followed by his signature "Folsom Prison Blues."

Much of Cash's music echoed themes of sorrow, moral tribulation and redemption, especially in the later stages of his career. His best-known songs included "I Walk the Line,” "Folsom Prison Blues,” "Ring of Fire,” "Get Rhythm" and "Man in Black". He also recorded humorous numbers like "One Piece at a Time" and "A Boy Named Sue"; a duet with his future wife, June Carter, called "Jackson" (followed by many further duets after their marriage); andrailroad songs including "Hey, Porter" and "Rock Island Line". During the last stage of his career, Cash covered songs by several late 20th century rock artists, most notably "Hurt" by Nine Inch Nails.

JERRY HOLLAND

(February 23, 1955 – July 16, 2009)

Jerry Holland (February 23, 1955 – July 16, 2009) was a fiddler and tune composer who lived on Cape Breton Island in Nova Scotia, Canada.

He was born in Brockton, Massachusetts, United States to Canadian parents – his father was from New Brunswick and his mother was from Quebec. During his childhood, Holland was exposed to the music of the large Cape Breton expatriate community in Boston. He began to play the fiddle and step-dance at the age of five, and played at his first square dance at the age of six. He made his television debut in 1962 on the Canadian program Don Messer's Jubilee. By the time he was ten years old, he was playing regularly at dances in the Boston area. Holland's family made annual summer trips to Cape Breton, and he moved there permanently in 1975.

In his early 20s, Holland performed with the Cape Breton Symphony, a group of fiddlers that included Winston "Scotty" Fitzgerald, Angus Chisholm, Joe Cormier, Wilfred Gillis and John Donald Cameron. The group appeared regularly on CBC television on The John Allan Cameron Show and other programs. From playing with these much older and more experienced musicians, Holland gained an appreciation for the traditional style of Cape Breton fiddle music, as well as a repertoire of over a thousand fiddle tunes.

Holland released his first, self-titled album in 1976. It was his second album, Master Cape Breton Fiddler (1982, re-released on CD in 2001), that made his reputation as a ground-breaking musician.[citation needed] Accompanied by Dave MacIsaac on guitar and Hilda Chiasson on piano, Holland pioneered a new, more modern sound for Cape Breton music on this album, while still remaining firmly within the Cape Breton tradition. Master Cape Breton Fiddler was a major influence on younger Cape Breton fiddlers such as Howie MacDonald. Holland released thirteen albums and appeared as a guest musician on over 25 more. He published two collections of fiddle tunes: Jerry Holland's Collection of Fiddle Tunes and Jerry Holland's Second Collection of Fiddle Tunes, both edited by Paul Cranford. He was also noted as a composer of fiddle tunes, most famously "Brenda Stubbert's Reel" (named for his friend and fellow Cape Breton fiddler Brenda Stubbert) and "My Cape Breton Home".

Holland died on July 16, 2009 from cancer. [for more info and CDs, read Wikipedia]

CELEBRATING BLACK HISTORY MONTH

ROBERT "BILBO" WALKER JR

(February 19, 1937)

ROBERT "BILBO" WALKER JR. (born February 19, 1937) is a blues musician. who is known in the blues music world due to his "rock 'n' roll showmanship" and "flamboyant Chuck Berry imitations."

Walker was born near Clarksdale, Mississippi. Walker Sr. was often referred to by his nickname, "Bilbo", which was then passed onto to Walker Jr., who was also sometimes called Little Junior Bilbo. Walker began to explore music after his sister's boyfriend introduced him to Ike Turner. After spending 17 years in Chicago, Illinois with his friend David Porter, Walker moved to the area around Bakersfield, California and started a farm growing such commodities aswatermelon and cotton.[2] During this time, he continued to perform at local bars in the California area, as well as in Chicago and Clarksdale when on visits. He currently still resides in California.

In 1997, Walker released his first album, Promised Land, and followed it with two more records, 1998s Rompin' & Stompin' and 2001s Rock the Night.

DAVID BLUE

(February 18, 1941 – December 2, 1982)

David Blue (February 18, 1941 – December 2, 1982), born Stuart David Cohen, was an American singer-songwriter and actor.

He was an integral part of the Greenwich Village folk music scene in New York, which included Bob Dylan, Phil Ochs, Dave Van Ronk, Tom Paxton, and Eric Andersen. Blue is best known for writing the song "Outlaw Man" for the Eagles, which was included on their 1973 Desperado album, as well as released as their second single from this album. Blue's original version of "Outlaw Man" was the lead track of his own Nice Baby and the Angel album, issued on CD, with the entire David Blue catalogue, in 2007 on Wounded Bird Records.

Blue joined Dylan's Rolling Thunder Revue in 1975 and appeared in Renaldo and Clara, the 1978 movie that was filmed during that tour. Blue acted in other films including, The American Friend (1977), directed by Wim Wenders, The Ordeal of Patty Hearst (a 1979 TV movie) and Human Highway (1982) by Neil Young. Human Highway premiered in 1983 after Blue's death. Blue also performed onstage in Stephen Poliakoff's play American Days at Manhattan Theatre Club in New York City, in December 1980, directed by Jacques Levy.

Blue died of a heart attack in December 1982 at the age of 41, while jogging in Washington Square Park in New York City.

CELEBRATING BLACK HISTORY MONTH

MAVIS STAPLES

Congrats to the Grammy Winner - Best American Roots Performance

Mavis Staples (born July 10, 1939) is an American rhythm and blues and gospel singer, actress and civil rights activist. She has recorded and performed with her family's band The Staple Singers, and also as a solo artist.

Staples was born in Chicago, Illinois on July 10, 1939. She began her career with her family group in 1950. Initially singing locally at churches and appearing on a weekly radio show, the Staples scored a hit in 1956 with "Uncloudy Day" for the Vee-Jay label. When Mavis graduated from what is nowPaul Robeson High School in 1957, The Staple Singers took their music on the road. Led by family patriarch Roebuck "Pops" Staples on guitar and including the voices of Mavis and her siblings Cleotha, Yvonne, and Purvis, the Staples were called "God's Greatest Hitmakers."

With Mavis' voice and Pops' songs, singing, and guitar playing, the Staples evolved from enormously popular gospel singers (with recordings on Unitedand Riverside as well as Vee-Jay) to become the most spectacular and influential spirituality-based group in America. By the mid-1960s The Staple Singers, inspired by Pops' close friendship with Martin Luther King, Jr., became the spiritual and musical voices of the civil rights movement. They covered contemporary pop hits with positive messages, including Bob Dylan's "A Hard Rain's a-Gonna Fall" and a version of Stephen Stills' "For What It's Worth".

During a December 20, 2008 appearance on National Public Radio's news show Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me! when Staples was asked about her past personal relationship with Dylan, she admitted they "were good friends, yes indeed" and that he had asked her father for her hand in marriage.

The Staples sang "message" songs like "Long Walk to D.C." and "When Will We Be Paid?," bringing their moving and articulate music to a huge number of young people. The group signed to Stax Records in 1968, joining their gospel harmonies and deep faith with musical accompaniment from members of Booker T. and the MGs. The Staple Singers hit the Top 40 eight times between 1971 and 1975, including two No. 1 singles, "I'll Take You There" and "Let's Do It Again," and a No. 2 single "Who Took the Merry Out of Christmas?" Staples made her first solo foray while at Epic Records with The Staple Singers releasing a lone single "Crying in the Chapel" to little fanfare in the late 1960s. The single was finally re-released on the 1994 Sony Music collection Lost Soul. Her first solo album would not come until a 1969 self-titled release for the Stax label. After another Stax release, Only for the Lonely, in 1970, she released a soundtrack album, A Piece of the Action, on Curtis Mayfield's Curtom label. A 1984 album (also self-titled) preceded two albums under the direction of rock star Prince; 1989's Time Waits for No One, followed by 1993's The Voice, which Peoplemagazine named one of the Top Ten Albums of 1993. Her recent 1996 release, Spirituals & Gospels: A Tribute to Mahalia Jackson was recorded with keyboardistLucky Peterson. The recording honours Mahalia Jackson, a close family friend and a significant influence on Mavis Staples' life. The Fairfield Four is an American gospel group that has existed for over 90 years. They started as a trio in Nashville, Tennessee's Fairfield Baptist Church in 1921. They were designated as National Heritage Fellows in 1989 by the National Endowment for the Arts.

p class="fwsubtitle">CELEBRATING BLACK HISTORY MONTH

THE FAIRFIELD FOUR

Congrats to the Grammy Winner - Best Roots Gospel Album

The Fairfield Four is an American gospel group that has existed for over 90 years. They started as a trio in Nashville, Tennessee's Fairfield Baptist Church in 1921. They were designated as National Heritage Fellows in 1989 by the National Endowment for the Arts.

The group won the 1998 Grammy for Best Traditional Soul Gospel Album. As a quintet, they featured briefly in the motion picture O Brother, Where Art Thou?.

The group gained more popular recognition after appearing on John Fogerty's 1997 album Blue Moon Swamp, singing on the track "A Hundred and Ten in the Shade". They also undertook live appearances with Fogerty. They also appeared on the song "There Will Be Peace in the Valley for Me" by Dolly Parton on her 2003 studio album For God and Country. They were later featured on the song "Rock of Ages" by Amy Grant & Vince Gill on Grant's 2005 studio album Rock of Ages... Hymns and Faith.

The Fairfield Four's newest album Still Rockin' My Soul! was released on March 10, 2015, and won the 58th Grammy awards.

CELEBRATING BLACK HISTORY MONTH

(JAMES) KOKOMO ARNOLD

(February 15, 1901 – November 8, 1968)

Kokomo Arnold (February 15, 1901 – November 8, 1968) was an American blues musician. Born as James Arnold in Lovejoy's Station, Georgia, he got his nickname in 1934 after releasing "Old Original Kokomo Blues" for the Decca label; it was a cover of the Scrapper Blackwell blues song about the city of Kokomo, Indiana. A left-handed slide guitarist, he had an intense slide style of playing and rapid-fire vocal style that set him apart from his contemporaries.

Having learned the basics of the guitar from his cousin, John Wiggs, Arnold began playing in the early 1920s as a sideline while he worked as a farmhand in Buffalo, New York, and as a steelworker in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. In 1929 he moved to Chicago and set up a bootlegging business, an activity he continued throughout Prohibition. In 1930 Arnold moved south briefly, and made his first recordings, "Rainy Night Blues" and "Paddlin' Madeline Blues", under the name Gitfiddle Jim for the Victor label in Memphis.[3] He soon moved back to Chicago, although he was forced to make a living as a musician after Prohibition ended in 1933. Kansas Joe McCoy heard him and introduced him to Mayo Williams who was producing records for Decca.

From his first recording for Decca on September 10, 1934, until his last on May 12, 1938, Arnold made 88 sides, seven of which remain lost. Arnold, Peetie Wheatstraw and Bumble Bee Slim were dominant figures in Chicago blues circles of that time. Peetie Wheatstraw & Arnold in particular were also major influences upon musical contemporary seminal delta blues artist Robert Johnson and thus modern music as a whole. Johnson turned "Old Original Kokomo Blues" into "Sweet Home Chicago", "Milk Cow Blues" into "Milkcow's Calf Blues", while another Arnold song, "Sagefield Woman Blues", introduced the terminology "dust my broom", which Johnson used as a song title himself.

Other notable songs include his 1934 recording of the "Sissy Man Blues" with its openly bisexual lyrics, including the line, "Lord, if you can't send me no woman, please send me some sissy man."[6]This piece went on to also be recorded by other blues musicians of the era including Josh White (Pinewood Tom), George Noble and Connie McLean's Rhythm Kings.

In 1938 Arnold left the music industry and began to work in a Chicago factory. Rediscovered by blues researchers in 1962, he showed no enthusiasm for returning to music to take advantage of the new explosion of interest in the blues among young white audiences. He died of a heart attack in Chicago, aged 67, in 1968, and was buried in the Burr Oak Cemetery in Alsip, Illinois.

CELEBRATING BLACK HISTORY MONTH

LEAD BELLY

Huddie William Ledbetter (January 20, 1888 – December 6, 1949) was an American folk and blues musician notable for his strong vocals, virtuosity on the twelve-string guitar, and the songbook of folk standards he introduced. He is best known as Lead Belly. Though many releases list him as "Leadbelly", he himself wrote it as "Lead Belly", which is also the spelling on his tombstone and the spelling used by the Lead Belly Foundation. Lead Belly usually played a twelve-string guitar, but he also played the piano, mandolin, harmonica, violin, and "windjammer" (diatonic accordion). In some of his recordings he sings while clapping his hands or stomping his foot. Lead Belly's songs covered a wide range, including gospel music; blues about women, liquor, prison life, and racism; and folk songs about cowboys, prison, work, sailors, cattle herding, and dancing. He also wrote songs about people in the news, such as Franklin D. Roosevelt, Adolf Hitler, Jean Harlow, the Scottsboro Boys, and Howard Hughes. Lead Belly was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1988 and the Louisiana Music Hall of Fame in 2008.[Wikipedia]

CELEBRATING BLACK HISTORY MONTH

DOM FLEMONS

Dom Flemons is the "American Songster," pulling from traditions of old-time folk music to create new sounds. Having performed music professionally since 2005, he has played live for over one million people just within the past three years. As part of the Carolina Chocolate Drops, which he co-founded with Rhiannon Giddens and Justin Robinson, he has played at a variety of festivals spanning from the Newport Folk Festival to Bonnaroo, in addition to renowned venues such as the Grand Ole Opry.

Raised in Phoenix, Arizona, Dom’s involvement with music began by playing percussion in his high school band. After picking up the guitar and harmonica as a teenager, he began to play in local coffee houses and became a regular performer on the Arizona folk music scene. Dom wrote his own songs and produced 25 albums of singer-songwriters and slam poets in the Phoenix area, including six albums of his own, during this time. He took a brief break from playing music in order to pursue slam poetry (he majored in English at Northern Arizona University) and performed in two national poetry slams in 2002 and 2003. Aside from exploring slam poetry, he spent his early adulthood listening to records and discovering a love of folk music, blues, jazz, jug band music, country music and ‘50s rock ‘n’ roll. Dom became interested in folk musicians such as Phil Ochs, Dave Van Ronk and Mike Seeger, as well as musicians such as Mississippi John Hurt, Howlin’ Wolf, Hank Williams, Chuck Berry and Carl Perkins. After stepping away from the slam poetry scene, he rekindled his interest in music, this time focusing on the old-time blues music of the pre-WWII era.

A multi-instrumentalist, Dom plays banjo, guitar, harmonica, fife, bones, bass drum, snare drum and quills, in addition to singing. He says that he incorporates his background in percussion to his banjo playing. Dom’s banjo repertoire includes not only clawhammer but also tenor and three-finger styles of playing. He first picked up the instrument when he borrowed a five-string banjo from a friend who had removed the instrument’s fifth string. As a founding member of the Carolina Chocolate Drops, an African-American string band, Dom was able to explore his interest in bringing traditional music to new audiences. The band won a GRAMMY for its 2011 album Genuine Negro Jig and was nominated for its most recent album, Leaving Eden, in 2012.

Dom says he would like to use the traditional forms of music he has heard and immersed himself in over the years to create new soundscapes that generate interest in old-time folk music. Focusing very much on creating music that is rooted in history but taking a contemporary approach, Dom hopes to reexamine what traditional music can become. In July 2014, Dom released his third solo record with Music Maker Relief Foundation, and his first since leaving the Carolina Chocolate Drops. Prospect Hill finds Flemons digging deeply into ragtime, Piedmont blues, spirituals, southern folk music, string band music, jug band music, fife and drum music, and ballads idioms with showmanship and humor, reinterpreting the music to suit 21st century audiences. He was featured on NPR's Fresh Air with Terry Grossand his new album has received praise from The Boston Globe, Paste Magazine, Living Blues Magazine, and more.

CELEBRATING BLACK HISTORY MONTH

SAM CHATMON

Sam Chatmon (January 10, 1897 – February 2, 1983) was a Delta blues guitarist and singer. He was a member of the Mississippi Sheiks and may have been Charlie Patton's half brother.

Chatmon was born in Bolton, Mississippi. Chatmon's family was well known in Mississippi for their musical talents; Chatmon was a member of the family's string band when he was young. He performed on a regular basis for white audiences in the 1900s.

The Chatmon band played rags, ballads, and popular dance tunes. Two of Sam's brothers, fiddler Lonnie Chatmon and guitarist Bo Carter, performed with guitarist Walter Vinson as the Mississippi Sheiks.

Chatmon played the banjo, mandolin, and harmonica in addition to the guitar. He performed at parties and on street corners throughout Mississippi for small pay and tips. In the 1930s he recorded both with the Sheiks, as well as with sibling Lonnie as the Chatman Brothers.

Chatmon moved to Hollandale, Mississippi in the early 1940s and worked on plantations in Hollandale. He was re-discovered in 1960 and started a new chapter of his career as folk-blues artist. In the same year Chatmon recorded for the Arhoolie record label. He toured extensively during the 1960s and 1970s. While in California in 1970 he got together and made several recordings with Sue Draheim, Kenny Hall, Ed Littlefield, Lou Curtiss, Kathy Hall, Will Scarlett and others at Sweet's Mill Music Camp, forming a group he called "The California Sheiks".[1] He played many of the largest and best-known folk festivals, including the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in Washington, D.C. in 1972, the Mariposa Folk Festival in Toronto in 1974, and the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival in 1976.

During an interview Chatmon explained that he started playing the guitar with 3 years of age, by laying it flat on the floor and crawling under it.[2]

A headstone memorial to Chatmon with the inscription "Sitting on top of the World" was paid for by Bonnie Raitt through the Mt. Zion Memorial Fund and placed in Sanders Memorial Cemetery, Hollandale, Mississippi on March 14, 1998 at a large ceremomy held at the Hollandale Municipal Building, celebrated by the Mayor and members of the City Council of Hollandale as well as over 100 attendees.[Wikipedia]

KRIS KRISTOFFERSON & MERLE HAGGARD

Dateline Beverly Hills,

February 2, 2016:

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Merle Haggard's concert with Kris Kristofferson at the Saban Theatre tonight was canceled due to Merle's illness. He is recovering from double pneumonia.

FolkWorks wishes Merle Haggard a complete, painless, and speedy recovery so that your concert with Kris Kristofferson may be rescheduled later this year.

All fans of great country and folk music are on the fighting side of Merle Haggard and send our heartfelt prayers and good wishes to his family for a return to good health.

JEFF AUSTIN BAND

Jeff Austin (born in Arlington Heights, Illinois) is a mandolinist and singer best known for being a part of the Yonder Mountain String Band. Although Austin was born in Arlington Heights, he grew up in Elk Grove, Illinois and attended Rolling Meadows High School. Austin attended the University of Cincinnati, but soon made his way to Urbana, Illinois, where he met future banjoist Dave Johnston. Receiving a request from Johnston to perform in his band The Bluegrassholes, Austin picked up the mandolin for the first time. After some time, Austin moved to Nederland, Colorado. Johnston, after seeking improvement in his playing ability, also moved to Nederland. While attending a club called the Verve, Austin met Adam Aijala and Ben Kaufmann, with whom he and Johnston would form the Yonder Mountain String Band.

JOAN BAEZ - 1965

1. I'm A Rambler, I'm A Gambler -0:00

2. There But For Fortune - 2:30

3. Copper Kettle - 6:08

1. Silver Dagger - 0:00

2. Oh Freedom - 3:00

3. She's A Troublemaker - 6:41

HAPPY BIRTHDAY

PADDY KEENAN

( January 30, 1950)

PADDY KEENAN (born 30 January 1950) is an Irish player of the uilleann pipes who first gained fame as a founding member of The Bothy Band. Since that group's dissolution in the late 1970s, Keenan has released a number of solo and collaborative recordings, and continues to tour both as a soloist, and with singer/guitarist Tommy O'Sullivan. Paddy Keenan was born in Trim, County Meath in 1950 to John Keenan (an Irish Traveller) and Mary Bravender Keenan (of settled descent). Though the Keenan family abandoned the Traveling lifestyle early in Paddy's life, he spent much of his youth contending with discrimination, including regular physical confrontations. His father and grandfather both played the pipes, and his father spent many nights playing along with piper Johnny Doran. Paddy was introduced to the tin whistle by his brother Johnny Keenan (a notable Irish banjo player) around age six, and began playing the pipes around age nine. Recognizing his son's interest, John Keenan tutored Paddy, along with neighboring children including Finbar Furey and Davy Spillane. During this period, the Keenan household was, de facto, an ongoing session. At age 14, Paddy played his first major concert at the Gaiety Theatre, Dublin, followed by a few years of touring with a number of musicians, including his father, as "The Pavees." At 17, attempting to escape the strictness of his father's household, Paddy went to England; he ended up busking around London, singing and playing blues and rock songs on guitar for the majority of the following four years. Having nearly sold or thrown away his pipes multiple times, he discovered in 1971 that busking with them was far more lucrative than with the guitar, and resumed his piping career.

Early groups and The Bothy Band

Returning to Dublin, Keenan played regularly with his brothers and father at folk clubs and various venues around Ireland. In 1975, he was part of a band called Seachtar, from the Irish word for 'seven people.' This band was the genesis of The Bothy Band, of which Keenan was a mainstay from its inception to its demise in 1979.

A solo career

Keenan's first (and eponymous) solo album appeared in 1975, and he also duetted with fiddler Paddy Glackin on the 1978 album Doublin. He subsequently recorded a second solo album for Gael-Linn Records, Poirt An Phiobaire, in 1983. After rejecting the chance to join Moving Hearts in the early 1980s, Keenan's musical career went into abeyance. However, in the 1990s he relocated to North America, rediscovered his musical talents and in 1997 issued "Na Keen Affair", recorded at Dadyeen Studios, St. Johns, Newfoundland, Canada. Supporting musicians include Tommy Peoples on fiddle, Arty McGlynn and Tommy O'Sullivan on guitar, as well as Newfoundland musicians. This led to an ongoing musical relationship with the London-born, Kerry-based guitarist Tommy O'Sullivan. Together, the pair issued "The Long Grazing Acre" in 2001, touring jointly to promote the album. According to their respective websites, Keenan and O'Sullivan have continued to perform together periodically since 2001.

The 2008 documentary Dambé: The Mali Project tells the story of his 3000 mile cross-cultural musical adventure with Liam Ó Maonlaí (Hothouse Flowers) and friends, and features performances from the Festival au Désert. [Wikipedia]

HAPPY BIRTHDAY

MORGAN SEXTON

( January 28, 1911 – January 30, 1992)

MORGAN SEXTON was 77 years old when he made his first public appearance as a banjo player, performing in 1988 at the Appalachian music festival Seedtime on the Cumberland. Born in southeastern Kentucky in 1911, Sexton grew up in a musical family and learned to play the banjo as a child. Working for much of his life as a coal miner, he returned in his later years to his music, playing for community gatherings before gaining wider exposure. Following his 1988 debut, Sexton received almost immediate national attention and commenced a remarkable if brief career, performing at festivals, teaching banjo workshops, and recording a small body of traditional ballads and tunes. In 1989, Sexton's first recording, Rock Dust, appeared on the June Appal label; in 1991, the National Endowment for the Arts presented Sexton with a National Heritage Fellowship in recognition of his contributions to regional traditions. Following his death later that year, June Appal released another album of songs which Sexton had recorded since his discovery; that release, entitled Shady Grove, included several tracks from Rock Dust in addition to previously unissued material. Morgan Sexton's music, though deeply expressive of local Appalachian traditions, tends to defy strict classification, stereotype, or even notation. Sexton played in a variety of tunings, typically employing a highly personalized two-finger picking style. His voice itself functioned as the oldest and most emotive of instruments, fashioning meaning less through the lyrics of a song than through the archaic and soulful delivery of often unintelligible words. Sexton's banjo and voice complemented each other masterfully, the banjo providing the gently percussive foundation for each piece and the unpredictable, other-worldly vocals elaborating beautifully on the song's musical and emotional themes. Morgan Sexton died of cancer on January 30th, 1992, two days over 81 years old. ~ Burgin Mathews, Rovi (http://www.cmt.com/)

HAPPY BIRTHDAY

KATE WOLF

(, January 27, 1942 – December 10, 1986)

KATE WOLF (January 27, 1942 – December 10, 1986) was an American folk singer and songwriter. Though her career was relatively short, she had a significant impact on the folk music scene, and many musicians continue to cover her songs. Her best-known compositions include "Here in California," "Love Still Remains," "Across the Great Divide," "Unfinished Life," and "Give Yourself to Love." Born in San Francisco, she started her music career in the band Wildwood Flower before recording ten records as a solo artist. Her songs have since been recorded by artists such as Nanci Griffith and Emmylou Harris (whose recording of "Love Still Remains" was nominated for a Grammy Award in 1999). An important mentor, friend and touring companion was Utah Phillips. She died in 1986, at age 44, after a long battle with leukemia. Her remains are buried at a small church cemetery in Goodyears Bar, California. (Wikipedia)

HAPPY BIRTHDAY - DENNIS MCGEE

(January 26, 1893, Eunice, Louisiana – October 3, 1989)

Dennis McGee was one of the earliest recorded Cajun musicians.

A fiddle player, he recorded and performed with Creole accordionist and vocalist Amédé Ardoin, with accordionist Angelas LeJeune, and with fiddlers Sady Courville and Ernest Frugé. The recordings with Courville and Frugé are among the few surviving examples of Cajun music as it existed before the influence of the accordion became prominent.

McGee's repertoire included not only the waltz and the two-step common to Cajun music but also such dances as the one-step, polka, mazurka, reel, cotillion, the varsovienne, and others. (Wikipedia)

BREAKING UP CHRISTMAS

Breakin’ Up Christmas is both the name for 12 days of partying, dancing, and music making ending up on January 6th, Old Christmas day, and also a song sung during that period. The tradition harks from the area that roughly includes Surry County NC, nearby Grayson and Carroll counties in VA, and the independent city of Galax located between the two.

Hooray Jake, hooray John

Breakin’ up Christmas all night long

Santa Claus come, done and gone

Breaking up Christmas right straight along

Don’t you remember a long time ago

The old folks danced the doesey-doe

The tune itself is not of great antiquity. It may have been composed by Preston ‘Pet’ McKinney, a fiddler and Civil War veteran from Lambsburg, VA. Mt. Airy, NC fiddler Tommy Jarrell, a 1982 NEA National Heritage Fellowship recipient strongly associated with this song, cited McKinney as one of his early influences.

Whether McKinney was the actual author of Breakin’ Up Christmas or not, there’s a reason the song can be distinctly pinpointed to the tri-county area. During rainy periods, that region’s roads, made mostly of red clay with no gravel, historically became so muddy that wagon wheels would sink in up to their axles. This made travel during inclement parts of the year either difficult or impossible.

New tunes only slowly made their way into the area, often by visitors or because a community member made a trip outside of his locality. Even so, as a tune bounced back and forth over the mountains between North Carolina and Virginia, local musicians might give it a different name, speed it up, add a new twist, and come up with a ‘souped-up’ version.

“Through this country here, they’d go from house to house almost – have a dance at one house, then go off to the next one the following night and all such as that. The week before Christmas and the week after, that’s when the big time was. About a two-week period, usually winding up about New Year. I wasn’t into any of this, but used to laugh about it. They’d play a tune called Breakin’ Up Christmas, that was the last dance they’d have on Christmas, they’d have Wallace Spanger play Breakin’ Up Christmas. There’s an old feller by the name of Bozwell, he’d cry every time.”

Lawrence Bolt, fiddler (b. 1894, Galax, VA)

From Appalachian History - Stories, quotes and anecdotes

THOMAS HART BENTON AND THE AMERICAN SOUND

book By Leo G. Mazow

Alternately praised as “an American original” and lampooned as an arbiter of kitsch, the regionalist painter Thomas Hart Benton has been the subject of myriad monographs and journal articles, remaining almost as controversial today as he was in his own time.

Roots of American Music
Roots of American Music.

Missing from this literature, however, is an understanding of the profound ways in which sound figures in the artist’s enterprises. Prolonged attention to the sonic realm yields rich insights into long-established narratives, corroborating some but challenging and complicating at least as many. A self-taught and frequently performing musician who invented a harmonica tablature notation system, Benton was also a collector, cataloguer, transcriber, and distributor of popular music. In Thomas Hart Benton and the American Sound, Leo Mazow shows that the artist’s musical imagery was part of a larger belief in the capacity of sound to register and convey meaning. In Benton’s pictorial universe, it is through sound that stories are told, opinions are voiced, experiences are preserved, and history is recorded.

More on Thomas Hart Benson and the Source of Country Music

The Country Music Foundation book

CHRISTMAS EVE

(AKA TOMMY COEN'S REEL)

Christmas Eve (Tommy Coen's reel) played by Dolores Keane (flute) and Mairtin Byrnes (fiddle) from the album There Was a Maid.

It may or may not be true. A writer on www.session.org  was told several years ago that "Christmas Eve" was a composition of the Galway -style fiddle player Tommy Coen, who did not have a name for the tune. It was broadcast on the Irish radio station RTE on a programme on Christmas eve in 1955, and so the name "Christmas Eve " was attached to the tune, and it has been known as that ever since.

From Fiddler’s Companion:

A popular session tune composed by Urrachree, Aughrim, East County Galway, fiddler Tommy Coen (1910-1974). Coen, who later lived in Salthill, was a conductor for Connemara buses during the day. A story about the title that has been circulating is that Coen’s tune was called “Christmas Eve” by the leader of a ceilidh band from Coen’s area who had been having a fight or dispute with the fiddler. He was invited with his band to play for a radio show in Dublin just before the Yule, and when introducing the tune names they were to play he choose not to mention Coen, but said the name of the reel was “Christmas Eve” because of the proximity of the holiday and to irk Coen. No one seems to know if the composer himself had a title for it.

PETE SEEGER, FOLK LEGEND & FBI TARGET

PETE SEEGER, Folk Legend & FBI Target: Declassified Docs Show Iconic Singer Was Spied on for Decades

From Democracy Now!: The late folk artist Pete Seeger was a musical and political icon who helped create the modern American folk music movement. Now there’s some new pages to add to his songbook—the government has released nearly 1,800 pages that reveal the FBI spied on him for nearly 30 years. The surveillance began when Seeger protested the targeting of Japanese Americans during World War II. It continued until the early 1970s as he wrote some of the most famous anti-war songs of the 20th century. We are joined by Pete Seeger’s biographer, David King Dunaway

BILLY MCCOMISKEY - IRISH ACCORDION CHAMP

Billy McComiskey (12/21/1951- ), is a highly regarded player/composer of Irish traditional music, was born in Brooklyn, New York. He picked up the button accordion at age six, inspired by his uncles’ playing and his mother’s love of the music. At age 15, Billy met his mentor, Sean McGlynn, a master and proponent of the East Galway style that now characterizes the playing of many of New York’s finest Irish accordion players.

After moving to Maryland, Billy played with two legendary trios: Washington DC’s renowned Irish Tradition and the internationally acclaimed Trian. He has continued playing over the years with many of New York’s finest Irish musicians, including, Peter McKiernan, Pat Keogh, Brian Conway, Jack and Fr. Charlie Coen, Patty Furlong, Mick Moloney, Felix and Brendan Dolan, Mike and Mary Rafferty, Joe and Joanie Madden, Mike Flynn, Mike McHale, Michael and Bernadette Fee, Johnny Leonard, John Nolan, Willie Kelly, Jimmy Kelly, Jerry O’Sullivan, John Fitzpatrick, Martin Mulhaire, Pat Murray, Noel Higgins, Mary Coogan, Dennis Galvin, Don Meade, Tony DeMarco, Linda Hickman, and many others.

Billy’s 1986 All-Ireland championship title attests to his mastery of the button accordion. His tunes are becoming a part of the traditional repertoire wherever Irish music is played. Several of his compositions have been recently published in Josephine Keegan’s new collection of Irish Traditional Tunes, “A Drop in the Ocean.” He is known on both sides of the Atlantic as an indefatigable session player, teacher and promulgator of The Music.

But Billy takes most pride in the development of the Irish traditional music community in the Baltimore-Washington area. He formed the Baltimore Ceili Band twenty years ago and performed with them at the 2004 Catskill Mountains Irish Arts Week in the legendary Shamrock House of East Durham, NY to a packed hall of enthusiastic dancers and music lovers, many of whom traveled from Baltimore to support them. Billy lives in Parkville, a suburb of Baltimore, with his wife Annie, their three sons, Patrick, Sean and Michael and their dog, Sally.

BILL KEITH - INVENTED KEITH STYLE BANJO

William Bradford "Bill" Keith (December 20, 1939 – October 23, 2015) was a five-string banjoist who made a significant contribution to the stylistic development of the instrument. In the 1960s he introduced a variation on the popular "Scruggs style" of banjo playing (an integral element of bluegrass music) which would soon become known as melodic style, or "Keith style".

Keith was born in Boston, Massachusetts. He attended Amherst College and graduated in 1961. In 1963 he became a member of Bill Monroe's Bluegrass Boys. Keith's recordings and performances during these nine months with Monroe permanently altered banjo playing, and his style became an important part of the playing styles of many banjoists. After leaving the Bluegrass Boys, he joined "Jim Kweskin Jug Band" playing plectrum banjo. He began playing the steel guitar and soon after 1968, found himself working together with Ian and Sylvia and Jonathan Edwards. In the 1970s Keith recorded for Rounder Records. Over the years he performed with several other musicians, such as Clarence White and David Grisman in Muleskinner, Tony Trischka, Jim Rooney and Jim Collier. Today, Keith style is still regarded as modern or progressive in the context of bluegrass banjo playing. He was inducted into the International Bluegrass Music Hall of Fame at an awards ceremony in Raleigh, NC on October 1, 2015 and delivered a heartfelt address on that occasion, just three weeks prior to his death. He died of cancer at his home in Woodstock, New York on October 23, 2015. [wikipedia]

PEG LEG SAM

PEG LEG SAM (December 18, 1911 – October 27, 1977) was an American country blues harmonicist, singer and comedian. He recorded "Fox Chase" and "John Henry", and worked in medicine shows. He gained his nickname following an accident while hoboing in 1930

Arthur Jackson in Jonesville, South Carolina, United States, to David Jackson, a farmer and native of Virginia, and Emma Jackson, Arthur was the fourth of six children. His fraternal great-grandmother, Racheal Williams, was born 1810 in Colonial Virginia, and was commonly referred to as a mulatto. She may have had a Caucasian mother or father, most likely, a caucasian father, as this would have been typical for the time period.

Peg Leg Sam taught himself to play harmonica as a small child but resented school, left home at the age of 12, and never stopped roving. He shined shoes, acted as a house boy, cooked on ships, hoboed, then made a living busking on street corners. He lost his leg trying to hop a train but made a peg out of a fencepost, bound it to his stub with a leather belt and kept moving.[4]

His ability to play two harmonicas at once (while one went in and out of his mouth) made him an attraction and he went on to perform in patent-medicine shows. He could also play notes on his harmonica with his nose. Peg Leg Sam went on to marry Theo S. Jackson, who was 18 years older than him, and the mother of Herbert Miller and Katherine Miller, both natives of Tennessee. Peg Leg Sam gave his last medicine-show performance in 1972 in North Carolina, but continued to appear at music festivals in his final years.

He died in Jonesville in October 1977, at the age of 65. [wikipedia]

Banjo Babe Evie Ladin

The Banjo Babes Calendar & Album (and Tour) is a collective, grassroots celebration of professional women banjo players.

The mission of the Banjo Babes Calendar & Album is to celebrate the music of women who play banjo by creating and sustaining one of the most comprehensive, inclusive and diverse annual compilation anthologies via a fun, professional, and empowering project that includes artistic photography in a calendar and world-class music on an album.

Some of the Banjo Babes (Evie Ladin, Erin Inglish, Stringtown Ambassadors, The Small Glories) will be performing tonight (December 17, 8:00pm) at the Coffee Gallery Backstage

Malawi's prison band up for a Grammy
– but may not even know it

Inmates of the country’s high-security jail
have won surprise place on the world music shortlist

From The Guardian

Zomba Prison Project
Inmates of the Zomba high-security prison have become the first Malawians to be nominated for the American awards. Photograph: Ian Brennan.

The maximum security prison in Zomba, Malawi is not the sort of place where Grammy-nominated albums are typically recorded.

But a group of Zomba’s inmates, many of them serving life sentences for offences including murder and theft, have found themselves nominated for a the prestigious awards in the best world music album category.

Read the full story on The Guardian's website.

DECEMBER 15, 2015

TODAYS' BIRTHDAYS:
A.P. CARTER (December 15, 1891 – November 7, 1960)
RAYNA GELLERT (December 15, 1975)

SEAMUS CONNOLLY

Played a vital role in BC’s emergence as a center for Irish music

By Sean Smith, Chronicle Editor

From The Boston College Chronicle

Published: Dec. 10, 2015

Seamus ConnollyMusician, teacher, organizer, scholar: Fulfilling these roles for the better part of a quarter-century, Seamus Connolly has helped make Boston College a go-to place for traditional music from Ireland, Scotland, Cape Breton and other Gaelic cultures.

But the final notes of Connolly’s tenure at BC have sounded.

Connolly, who has been BC’s Sullivan Family Artist-in-Residence since 2004, will retire from the University effective at the end of the fall semester. Appropriately enough, a formal public announcement of his plans came at Tuesday night’s Christmas concert in the Cadigan Alumni Center, held as part of the Gaelic Roots Music, Song, Dance, Workshop and Lecture Series – widely acclaimed as one of his signal achievements.

“There comes a moment in everyone’s life when you look back and then say, ‘It’s time,’” said Connolly in an interview last month. “I felt that over 25 years, with the help of many good people, we were able to accomplish so much in giving the Irish and other Gaelic music traditions a home at BC. So moving on at this point just seems the right thing to do.

“I wasn’t an academic, but working here I was very fortunate to be around the finest academics in the world, who were always so supportive and helpful to me.”

Arriving at BC in 1990, Connolly – a native of Killaloe in County Clare who moved to the US in 1976 – burnished his reputation as one of the finest Irish fiddlers of his generation by establishing Irish music, song and dance programs at the University, expanding the scope of BC’s groundbreaking Irish Studies Program. He made it possible for BC undergraduates to take for-credit classes – some of which he taught – in Irish fiddle, flute and tin whistle, as well as Irish dance.

NATHAN AND JESSIE

We met these folks at FAR-West...check them out...

"When I think of Nathan and Jessie, the image I am struck with most is their natural synchronicity. Their personalities, both personal and musical, appear seamless. The point is, you never really know what you are going to get. And that's the great aspect of being part of their audience - you get to experience the freshness that they create over and over again, two musicians who are totally in touch with the nuances of their own music and confident enough to continue to experiment, explore and engage, creating their own journey, and taking us along with them." - Larry Thompson via Echo and Buzz Local Music Publication

DECEMBER 1, 2015

Pat Collins - A REMEMBERANCE

From Adrien Burke via Facebook

Pat CollinsMy late friend Pat Collins used to come to the Celtic Arts Center every Monday eve to play in the traditional music session. He was an artist, musician, surfer, rock climber, and all around wonderful person. He got to know the homeless on Hollywood Blvd. He learned their names. He'd bring them a blanket or jacket sometimes, and sometimes he'd hand out $10-20 bills. He himself looked like Pan - he had very long dreadlocks, tied in back, and large blue eyes. He dressed in tattered t-shirts and cut off jeans- like a musician in fact. He was a vegan and quite thin. So one guy he handed a $20 to told him he'd given him too much by mistake. Pat said, no - keep it, and the homeless guy got concerned: are you sure, man? You don't look so good yourself? Do you have a place to stay? Pat assured him he owned his own house and car and was even employed at the time. But when he told the story in the Snug, someone said you shouldn't give them that much money - they'll just get drunk. I know, Pat said, If I were living on the streets in winter, I'd want to get drunk too. I just want him to get good and drunk - drink good liquor - and remember this night. And that's the story I told at Pat's wake. There were many good stories that night. I think his family was surprised........

NOVEMBER 12th, 2015

MARLA FIBISH

Marla Fibish 2A San Francisco native, Marla is a long time feature of the Bay area Irish music scene...and an unapologetic proponent of the mandolin in Irish music.

With her husband Bruce Victor, they are the band Noctambule. They play original and traditional music in a variety of forms – original musical settings of a broad array of poetry, original instrumental pieces, and traditional Irish tunes and songs. This unique collaboration brings out qualities in both of these seasoned musicians that you may not have heard from them before. Their music is rendered with lush beauty, sensitivity and humor on an unusual array of strings -- various guitars in varied tunings, mandola, mandolin, bouzouki, cittern, tenor guitar -- and their blended voices.
They take the name Noctambule, French for 'night-owl,’ from a Robert Service poem about a nocturnal ramble through the back alleys of Paris, which they have set to music and included on their acclaimed CD Travel in the Shadows. Their first CD together, it explores many forms of the ‘night journey’ in song, offering the traveler the opportunity to see and experience things differently once the usual sources of light have been extinguished. They have selected a broad variety of ‘noctambulatory’ verse from Tennyson, Neruda, Roethke, St. Vincent Millay, and Robert Service. In addition, they include two original instrumental pieces – a reel and a waltz – as well as one traditional Irish song.

OCTOBER 27th, 2015

PASSINGS

LEON BIBB

Leon BibbLeon Bibb (February 7, 1922 – October 23, 2015) was an American folk singer and actor who grew up in Kentucky, studied voice in New York, and worked on Broadway. His career began when he became a featured soloist of the Louisville Municipal College glee club as a student. He lived in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, after 1969. Bibb was born in Louisville, Kentucky and was one of the performers at the first Newport Folk Festival in 1959. He also had his own NBC television talk show. During the late-1950s and early-1960s, Bibb was one of a number of American entertainers, such as his good friend Paul Robeson, who were blacklisted for alleged ties to left-wing groups and causes. In 1963, Bibb traveled to Mississippi to join Dick Gregory and others in the fight against racial segregation in the United States. Despite that setback, Bibb continued to perform, and around 1963–64 he was featured singing on the national TV show, Hootenanny, on The Ed Sullivan Show and performed with Bill Cosby on tours. He also provided the soundtrack to Luis Bunuel's 1960 film The Young One. His a cappella vocals blend his classical, spiritual and blues influences. In 2009, he was made a Member of the Order of British Columbia. At the time of receiving this honor, Bibb was still an active performer. He was the father of the Helsinki, Finland-based acoustic blues singer/songwriter Eric Bibb, and grandfather of Swedish dancer and performer Rennie Mirro (in Swedish). (Wikipedia)

BILL KEITH

Bill KeithWilliam Bradford "Bill" Keith (December 20, 1939 – October 23, 2015) was a five-string banjoist who made a significant contribution to the stylistic development of the instrument. In the 1960s he introduced a variation on the popular "Scruggs style" of banjo playing (an integral element of bluegrass music) which would soon become known as melodic style, or "Keith style." Keith was born in Boston, Massachusetts. He attended Amherst College and graduated in 1961. In 1963 he became a member of Bill Monroe's Bluegrass Boys. Keith's recordings and performances during these nine months with Monroe permanently altered banjo playing, and his style became an important part of the playing styles of many banjoists. After leaving the Bluegrass Boys, he joined Jim Kweskin Jug Band playing plectrum banjo. He began playing the steel guitar and soon after 1968, found himself working together with Ian and Sylvia and Jonathan Edwards. In the 1970s Keith recorded for Rounder Records. Over the years he performed with several other musicians, such as Clarence White and David Grisman in Muleskinner, Tony Trischka, Jim Rooney and Jim Collier. Today, Keith style is still regarded as modern or progressive in the context of bluegrass banjo playing. He was inducted into the International Bluegrass Music Hall of Fame at an awards ceremony in Raleigh, NC on October 1, 2015 and delivered a heartfelt address on that occasion, just three weeks prior to his death. He died of cancer on October 23, 2015. Keith made a mechanical contribution to the banjo, as well. He designed a specialized type of banjo tuning peg that facilitates changing quickly from one open tuning to another, while playing. Earlier famed banjoist Earl Scruggs had designed a set of cams which were added to the banjo to perform this task. Keith's invention made the extra hardware unnecessary, replacing two of the tuning machines already on the banjo — a more elegant solution. Scruggs himself became a partner in the venture for a while, and the product was known as "Scruggs-Keith Pegs". Known today simply as Keith Pegs, they remain the state of the art, and Bill Keith continued to manufacture and market them personally as the primary product of his own company, the Beacon Banjo Company, until his death. Beacon Banjo tuners continue their proud tradition, now in the hands of his son, Martin. (Wikipedia) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q3QlfvOOt9c

OCTOBER 23rd, 2015

Nevenka  Swing Riots

Saturday, October 24th, 2015 - 7:30 pm

Unitarian Universalist Community Church of Santa Monica

1260 18th St, Santa Monica, CA 90404

310-829-5436

Tickets

OCTOBER 14th, 2015

MOUNTAIN MUSIC DAY

Mountain Music Day is a yearly, day-long feast of traditional folk music set in the lush mountains of Oak Glen in Yucaipa, California. Designed as a fundraiser for The Old School House, the event has attracted the support of popular folk musicians and enthusiasts from all over Southern California. Come up and enjoy the cool mountain air!

Sunday, October 18th, 2015 - 11:00 am to 5:00 pm

11911 S. Oak Glen Rd., Yucaipa, CA  92399

Concerts, Workshops & Jams

CONCERTS

Featuring:

Doug Thomson & Friends - 11:00 am

Bob Palmer & Friends - 11:45 am

Barney Gentry & Jack Hammen - 12:30 pm

South Coast - 1:15 pm

Grits & Grady - 2:00 pm

The Corzines Bluegrass Band - 2:45 pm

Kattywompus String Band - 3:30 pm

Kinfolk - 4:15 pm

WORKSHOPS: 

Beginning Mountain Dulcimer 

Intermediate Mountain Dulcimer

Beginning Hammered Dulcimer

Spoons

Folk Guitar and Songwriting

Autoharp

OPEN JAM

Doug Thomson 909-987-5701 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

OCTOBER 13th, 2015

FLATFOOTING WORKSHOP WITH PHIL JAMISON

This is a rare opportunity to learn classic western North Carolina flatfoot dance steps from a master dancer.

October 13- 7:30-9:30pm

American Legion Hall Post #206

227 N. Avenue 55, Highland Park, CA 90042

"I have been in awe of Phil since the 1970s, when I first started clogging/flatfooting and saw him in a famous group called The Greengrass Cloggers. They were all my heroes, who I wanted to be like…. "

-National Buckdancing Champion, Ruth Alpert

Class Description:

Flatfooting is a traditional style of step dancing from Appalachia that involves percussive footwork. While some dancers perform memorized sequences of steps, others are more improvisational and freeform in their movements (“doing their own thing”). Mainly though, it is a way to enjoy and participate in the music with your feet. This class, for dancers of all levels, will focus on the traditional flatfooting steps and styles of western North Carolina. No prior experience is required, but wear smooth-soled shoes (preferably leather) and no taps please.

Phil's book (Hoedowns, Reels, and Frolics: Roots and Branches of Southern Appalachian Dance (Music in American Life)), which is on the history of Southern Appalachian dance forms (including flatfooting, clogging, square dancing etc) is hot-off-the-press; it came out in July. Ten years of research, and it’s finally here, the definitive word on the subject!!! It’s available through his website, or on Amazon.

OCTOBER 12th, 2015

TANNAHILL WEAVERS

Scottish Trad Band

MONDAY OCT 12th - 8:00 pm at Coffee Gallery Backstage (Altadena)

"…the group has found an especially eloquent mixture of the old and the new."

Stephen Holden, New York Times

"…as close to perfect as it gets in an imperfect world."

Sing Out!

"...one of the most exhilarating acoustic bands on the Celtic map."

Irish Music Magazine

"...the Tannies are the best that Scotland can aspire to (and believe me, that is THE BEST)."

The Living Tradition

"…no band of their ilk has performed with more energy or authority than the Tannies, who blend guitar, mandolin, bouzouki, fiddle, whistles, bodhran and pipes into a lilting product as fine and enduring as the textiles woven by namesake weavers of their Scottish hometown, Paisley."

Westword, Denver CO

"…the Weavers’ unpretentious manner and superlative playing set them apart from most other Celtic groups... In a world where good taste has become a scarce commodity, the Tannahill Weavers are a wealthy bunch."

The Charleston Gazette, Charleston, SC

OCTOBER 5th, 2015

21st ANNUAL HARVEST FESTIVAL OF DULCIMERS

SATURDAY OCT 10th - 9:00 am - 8:00 pm

Presbyterian Church of the Covenant, 2850 Fairview Rd, Costa Mesa, CA 92626

The Southern California Dulcimer Heritage group invites you to the 21st annual Harvest Festival of Dulcimers on Saturday, October 10, 2015! In addition to the workshops and concerts on Saturday, there are special 4-hour focus workshops the next day taught by two featured performers, both back by popular demand: Fretted dulcimer virtuoso Bing Futch from Florida and hammered dulcimist extraordinaire Jody Marshall of Virginia. Additionally, over a dozen excellent local players will also be teaching and performing, including mountain dulcimer legend Joellen Lapidus and Patti Amelotte’s Irish music band Looney’s Fortune with hot hammered dulcimer, fiddle, guitar and accordions.

The festival will be happening this year at a new, larger location: The Presbyterian Church of the Covenant in beautiful suburban Costa Mesa, CA. There is a ‘festival motel’ with a convenient location and lodging package at a reasonable rate for out of town visitors. Additional information will be at www.scdh.org

As always, there will be a large variety of 'other workshops' - including 'try out' fretted dulcimers (loaner instruments available), guitar, ukulele, keyboard backup, singing, banjomer, music computer software and bowed psaltery (with loaner instruments) - taught by various members of the folk music and dulcimer communities in Southern California. Two tracks of dulcimer workshops will be given by Jody, Bing and six other instructors. You’ll find a full range of topics and hands-on classes in the 28 hours/ 7 tracks of workshops, plus a free Mid-day concert “Celebrating Regional Dulcimer Jam/ Practice Groups” and free jamming throughout the day.

The annual SCDH Dulcimer Festival is the only California dulcimer festival for both hammered and fretted dulcimers and the closest dulcimer festival for players in many nearly states.

For tickets & more info: www.scdh.org; e-mail This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.; call (714) 534–2855.

VISITING ARTISTS BING FUTCH - Mountain Dulcimer (Orlando, FL) JODY MARSHALL - Hammered Dulcimer (McLean, VA) EVENTS

Free - MID-DAY CONCERT Celebrating Regional Jam/ Practice Groups’ - Performances by Dulcimer Groups

EVENING CONCERT ~ JOELLEN LAPIDUS (Fretted Dulcimer) ~ BING FUTCH (Fretted Dulcimer) ~ JODY MARSHALL (Hammered Dulcimer) ~ LOONEY’S FORTUNE (Patti Amelotte, Georgiana Hennessy, Matt Tonge)

INSTRUCTORS / 28 Hours of WORKSHOPS

Fretted Dulcimer - Bing Futch, Joellen Lapidus, Leo Kretzner, Bob Palmer, Bobbi Adler

Hammered Dulcimer - Jody Marshall, Patti Amelotte, Jim Hayes, Karen Harvey

Banjomer & Fretted Hammer - Doug Thomson

Bowed Psaltery - Gregg Schneeman (Loaners available)

Guitar - Matt Tonge Singing - Bill Dempsey

Play & Sing and Music Software - Terry Gucwa

Keybard Backup - Georgiana Hennessy

Try out Fretted Dulcimers - Bob Palmer Ukulele - Jim Romano

FREE JAMS Open Jam Leaders - Marianne Scanlon 9-11am / Bruce & Lois Boyer 1:30-3:45pm Playing Together/Fretted Dulcimers - Doug Thomson & Bob Palmer; Community Jam - Barbara Gershman & Leo Kretzner

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SANTA BARBARA OLD TIME FIDDLERS CONVENTION

SUNDAY OCT 11th - 10:00 am - 5:00 pm

Stow House
304 N Los Carneros Rd, Goleta, CA 93117
805-681-7216

The Old Time Fiddlers' Convention & Festival, a celebration of Traditional American Music, is held every year at Rancho La Patera & Stow House. The family-festival features all day entertainment, one of the premier Old-Time Music contests on the West Coast, free workshops taught by some of the best teachers in the industry, opportunity to "jam" with other musicians, entrance to the museums and much more. This year's lineup includes the Old Time sound of GRAMMY winner Kathy Kallick Band, the award-winning Bay Area group Front Country, Joe Sands Fontenot Creole Cajun Band, along with local bluegrass favorites Ventucky String Band and the Salt Martians. The goal of the festival is to share and preserve Old Time American Music, an important part of our country's rich heritage and encourage a new generation o

This year's lineup includes the Old Time sound of GRAMMY winner Kathy Kallick Band, the award-winning Bay Area group Front Country, Joe Sands Fontenot Creole Cajun Band, along with local bluegrass favorites Ventucky String Band and the Salt Martians. The goal of the festival is to share and preserve Old Time American Music, an important part of our country's rich heritage and encourage a new generation of performers locally and beyond.

Musicians of all skill levels, including singers are encouraged to participate in the competition, which is free to enter with admission. Individual and/or group competitors designate their entries as Beginning, Intermediate, and Advanced levels in the following categories:

• Old-time Fiddling

• Traditional Banjo (any pre-bluegrass style)

• Traditional Singing

• Flat-pick Guitar

• Band Performance (playing and singing in traditional styles)

• Traditional Mandolin

• Other Folk Instrument (dulcimer, autoharp, jaw harp, etc.)

• Best Backup Instrument

The festival is well-loved by the community of musicians who bond with impromptu "jam sessions," instrument workshops and guests who enjoy the headliners on the stages. Local vendors and crafts will be available and food for purchase such as delicious BBQ from Georgia's Smokehouse, ice cream from Sugar & Salt Creamery, wine from Windrun and Stow Hard Lemonade.

The Night Before The Big Day…October 10th The evening before the festival, the Goodland Hotel, located at 5650 Camino Real in Goleta, is hosting a casual kick-off with bluegrass band "Ventucky" from 6-8 pm. The community is invited to begin the celebration of music with the no-host happy hour celebration. The festival is now produced by Goleta Valley Historical Society, stewards of Rancho La Patera & Stow House, with support from the Rotary Club of Santa Barbara Sunrise.

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OCTOBER 2nd, 2015

The Gloaming is fiddle master Martin Hayes, guitarist Dennis Cahill, sean-nós singer Iarla Ó Lionáird, hardanger innovator Caoimhin Ó Raghallaigh and New York pianist Thomas Bartlett (aka Doveman). These five master musicians, each with highly successful individual careers, have come together to create new music which pairs memorable, yearning melodies with a progressive style.

Although charged by the traditions of Ireland, what The Gloaming do with the structures of Irish music is anything but simple nostalgia. They introduce deep wells of personality and experience. Lyrics are drawn from the history of Irish literature, old and new. The music is played with the authority of virtuosos. The result is unclouded by sheen or sentimentality. Instead, it's haunting and emotionally charged. It sounds ancient without being a mere reproduction.

SEPTEMBER 30th, 2015

Betto Arcos, long time radio host at KPFK radio (90.7FM Los Angeles), did his final Global Village show on KPFK yesterday. He is producing a concert tonight with 3 great bands: Colombia’s 7 piece Joropo ensemble CIMARRON; Cuba’s SAN MIGUEL PEREZ TRIO, and LA’s own CHANGUI MAJADERO. He’ll also be screening “Los Otros Mexicanos,” a 50 min documentary about his life and work in LA, produced by Mexico’s Canal 11, focused on the Latin music scene in Los Angeles, featuring interviews with artists he's supported over the years: Cesar Castro, Las Cafeteras, Viento Callejero, La Santa Cecilia, Ry Cooder, John Densmore, and Rubén Martínez.

A WEEKEND OF CONTRADANCE

CONTRAversial

Thursday, September 17

Balch Auditorium, Scripps College

1030 N. Columbia Ave., Claremont, CA 91711

Caller: Becky Nankivell

Band: Tom Sauber and Contraband (Laura Osborn, Steve Lewis

Friday, September 18 - 8:00pm - 11:00pm (7:00pm= light supper; 7:30pm – instruction)

3rd Friday Contradance (CDC)

War Memorial Building

435 Fair Oaks South Pasadena, South Pasadena, CA 91030

Caller: Ginger Alberti

Band: High Strung String Band (Belinda Thom, fiddle - James Flaherty, banjo - David Hostetler, guitar

Saturday, September 19 – 8:00pm-11:00pm (7:30pm – instruction (dance free to new dancers who attend lesson)

Third Saturday Contradance (CDC)

Woman's Club of South Pasadena

1424 Fremont Ave, South Pasadena, CA 91030

Caller: Jeremy Korr

Band: Bonnie Insull (flute), Frank Hopppe (fiddle), and Jeffrey Spero (keyboard)

Sunday, October 20 – 4:00-7:00pm (3:30pm instruction)

Contra Pedro (CDC)

People's Yoga, Health & Dance / People's Place & Palace

365 W 6th St, San Pedro, CA 90731

Caller: Susan Michaels

Band: Gibberish (Kira Ott  (fiddle); Jeff Spero  (Keyboard, Bass); Jimmy Murphy  (Guitar, Mandolin)

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Sunday, October 20 – 6:30-9:30pm (6:00pm instruction)

Santa Barbara Contradance (SBCDS)

Carrillo Recreation Center

100 E Carrillo St, Santa Barbara, CA 93101

Caller: Jon Southard

Band: Rhythm Method - Brin Bandy (fiddle), Emil Olguin (guitar), Steve Shapiro (tenor banjo, mandolin, fiddle)

SEPTEMBER 23rd, 2015

This Friday night (Sep 25 at 8pm) two of our favorite world music groups will be performing: DakhaBrakha and Huun Huur Tu.

Drones and beats, crimson beads and towering black lambs-wool hats all serve as a striking backdrop for an unexpected, refreshingly novel vision of Eastern European roots music. This is the self-proclaimed “ethno-chaos” of Ukraine’s DakhaBrakha. They craft stunning new sonic worlds for traditional songs, reinventing their heritage with a keen ear for contemporary resonances.

The whistling of the high-mountain wind that forms eerie overtones; the repeated thrum of a string against wood and hide; a meditative, evocative music straight from the avant garde. Huun Huur Tu – the descendents of isolated Siberian herdsmen from Tuva, a Russian Federation republic situated on the Mongolian border - make serious, strangely universal music out of some of the planet’s quirkiest acoustics.

Ukrainian Block Party featuring Firebird Balalaika Ensemble... Come early (6:30pm) and join the musicians and dancers from Firebird Balalaika Ensemble, part of the amazing Los Angeles Balalaika Orchestra.  Raise a glass, bring your dancing shoes and have a piroshki! 

Center for the Art of Performance at UCLA (CAP-UCLA) at Royce Hall. Tickets!

A WEEKEND OF CONTRADANCE

CONTRAversial

Thursday, September 17

Balch Auditorium, Scripps College

1030 N. Columbia Ave., Claremont, CA 91711

Caller: Becky Nankivell

Band: Tom Sauber and Contraband (Laura Osborn, Steve Lewis

Friday, September 18 - 8:00pm - 11:00pm (7:00pm= light supper; 7:30pm – instruction)

3rd Friday Contradance (CDC)

War Memorial Building

435 Fair Oaks South Pasadena, South Pasadena, CA 91030

Caller: Ginger Alberti

Band: High Strung String Band (Belinda Thom, fiddle - James Flaherty, banjo - David Hostetler, guitar

Saturday, September 19 – 8:00pm-11:00pm (7:30pm – instruction (dance free to new dancers who attend lesson)

Third Saturday Contradance (CDC)

Woman's Club of South Pasadena

1424 Fremont Ave, South Pasadena, CA 91030

Caller: Jeremy Korr

Band: Bonnie Insull (flute), Frank Hopppe (fiddle), and Jeffrey Spero (keyboard)

Sunday, October 20 – 4:00-7:00pm (3:30pm instruction)

Contra Pedro (CDC)

People's Yoga, Health & Dance / People's Place & Palace

365 W 6th St, San Pedro, CA 90731

Caller: Susan Michaels

Band: Gibberish (Kira Ott  (fiddle); Jeff Spero  (Keyboard, Bass); Jimmy Murphy  (Guitar, Mandolin)

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Sunday, October 20 – 6:30-9:30pm (6:00pm instruction)

Santa Barbara Contradance (SBCDS)

Carrillo Recreation Center

100 E Carrillo St, Santa Barbara, CA 93101

Caller: Jon Southard

Band: Rhythm Method - Brin Bandy (fiddle), Emil Olguin (guitar), Steve Shapiro (tenor banjo, mandolin, fiddle)

SEPTEMBER 22nd, 2015

TONIGHT is the concert in support of Pitt Kingsolving at the Coffee Gallery Backstage. Pitt Kinsolving, a man with a most distinguished name, is known for organizing folk music events, as well as getting musicians together to make music. While engineering sound for recordings, performances, and other live programs has been his profession, he has been an important force in bringing folk music to Southern California through his volunteer efforts in planning and promoting concerts and festivals, and in his active participation in hoots. The concert will feature: WITCHER, RECUPIDO, LEVITT AND WITCHERSee the article about Pitt and the concert here.

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SANTA BARBARA OLD TIME FIDDLERS CONVENTION

The Santa Barbara Old Time Fiddlers Convention will be held on Sunday, October 11, 2015 from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. at Stow House in Goleta, just north of Santa Barbara. The headline entertainment this year is the Kathy Kallick Band. It's extremely important that we continue to support this event, which has been going for 44 years, as attendees and as contestants. Contestants are needed at all levels: beginning, intermediate and advanced players in banjo, fiddle, mandolin, guitar, and "other instruments." Signups are at the gate, and the contest rules, a few of which may be new this year, can be found on their web site.

A WEEKEND OF CONTRADANCE

CONTRAversial

Thursday, September 17

Balch Auditorium, Scripps College

1030 N. Columbia Ave., Claremont, CA 91711

Caller: Becky Nankivell

Band: Tom Sauber and Contraband (Laura Osborn, Steve Lewis

Friday, September 18 - 8:00pm - 11:00pm (7:00pm= light supper; 7:30pm – instruction)

3rd Friday Contradance (CDC)

War Memorial Building

435 Fair Oaks South Pasadena, South Pasadena, CA 91030

Caller: Ginger Alberti

Band: High Strung String Band (Belinda Thom, fiddle - James Flaherty, banjo - David Hostetler, guitar

Saturday, September 19 – 8:00pm-11:00pm (7:30pm – instruction (dance free to new dancers who attend lesson)

Third Saturday Contradance (CDC)

Woman's Club of South Pasadena

1424 Fremont Ave, South Pasadena, CA 91030

Caller: Jeremy Korr

Band: Bonnie Insull (flute), Frank Hopppe (fiddle), and Jeffrey Spero (keyboard)

Sunday, October 20 – 4:00-7:00pm (3:30pm instruction)

Contra Pedro (CDC)

People's Yoga, Health & Dance / People's Place & Palace

365 W 6th St, San Pedro, CA 90731

Caller: Susan Michaels

Band: Gibberish (Kira Ott  (fiddle); Jeff Spero  (Keyboard, Bass); Jimmy Murphy  (Guitar, Mandolin)

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Sunday, October 20 – 6:30-9:30pm (6:00pm instruction)

Santa Barbara Contradance (SBCDS)

Carrillo Recreation Center

100 E Carrillo St, Santa Barbara, CA 93101

Caller: Jon Southard

Band: Rhythm Method - Brin Bandy (fiddle), Emil Olguin (guitar), Steve Shapiro (tenor banjo, mandolin, fiddle)

SEPTEMBER 18th, 2015

A WEEKEND OF CONTRADANCE

Thursday, September 17 - 8:00pm-11:00pm

CONTRAversial

Balch Auditorium, Scripps College

1030 N. Columbia Ave., Claremont, CA 91711

Caller: Becky Nankivell

Band: Tom Sauber and Contraband (Laura Osborn, Steve Lewis

Friday, September 18 - 8:00pm - 11:00pm (7:00pm= light supper; 7:30pm – instruction)

3rd Friday Contradance (CDC)

War Memorial Building

435 Fair Oaks South Pasadena, South Pasadena, CA 91030

Caller: Ginger Alberti

Band: High Strung String Band (Belinda Thom, fiddle - James Flaherty, banjo - David Hostetler, guitar

Saturday, September 19 – 8:00pm-11:00pm (7:30pm – instruction (dance free to new dancers who attend lesson)

Third Saturday Contradance (CDC)

Woman's Club of South Pasadena

1424 Fremont Ave, South Pasadena, CA 91030

Caller: Jeremy Korr

Band: Bonnie Insull (flute), Frank Hopppe (fiddle), and Jeffrey Spero (keyboard)

Sunday, September 20 – 4:00-7:00pm (3:30pm instruction)

Contra Pedro (CDC)

People's Yoga, Health & Dance / People's Place & Palace

365 W 6th St, San Pedro, CA 90731

Caller: Susan Michaels

Band: jibberish (Kira Ott  (fiddle); Jeff Spero  (Keyboard, Bass); Jimmy Murphy  (Guitar, Mandolin)

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Sunday, September 20 – 6:30-9:30pm (6:00pm instruction)

Santa Barbara Contradance (SBCDS)

Carrillo Recreation Center

100 E Carrillo St, Santa Barbara, CA 93101

Caller: Jon Southard

Band: Rhythm Method - Brin Bandy (fiddle), Emil Olguin (guitar), Steve Shapiro (tenor banjo, mandolin, fiddle)

SANTA BARBARA OLD TIME FIDDLERS CONVENTION

The Santa Barbara Old Time Fiddlers Convention will be held on Sunday, October 11, 2015 from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. at Stow House in Goleta, just north of Santa Barbara. The headline entertainment this year is the Kathy Kallick Band. It's extremely important that we continue to support this event, which has been going for 44 years, as attendees and as contestants. Contestants are needed at all levels: beginning, intermediate and advanced players in banjo, fiddle, mandolin, guitar, and "other instruments." Signups are at the gate, and the contest rules, a few of which may be new this year, can be found on their web site.

A WEEKEND OF CONTRADANCE

CONTRAversial

Thursday, September 17

Balch Auditorium, Scripps College

1030 N. Columbia Ave., Claremont, CA 91711

Caller: Becky Nankivell

Band: Tom Sauber and Contraband (Laura Osborn, Steve Lewis

Friday, September 18 - 8:00pm - 11:00pm (7:00pm= light supper; 7:30pm – instruction)

3rd Friday Contradance (CDC)

War Memorial Building

435 Fair Oaks South Pasadena, South Pasadena, CA 91030

Caller: Ginger Alberti

Band: High Strung String Band (Belinda Thom, fiddle - James Flaherty, banjo - David Hostetler, guitar

Saturday, September 19 – 8:00pm-11:00pm (7:30pm – instruction (dance free to new dancers who attend lesson)

Third Saturday Contradance (CDC)

Woman's Club of South Pasadena

1424 Fremont Ave, South Pasadena, CA 91030

Caller: Jeremy Korr

Band: Bonnie Insull (flute), Frank Hopppe (fiddle), and Jeffrey Spero (keyboard)

Sunday, October 20 – 4:00-7:00pm (3:30pm instruction)

Contra Pedro (CDC)

People's Yoga, Health & Dance / People's Place & Palace

365 W 6th St, San Pedro, CA 90731

Caller: Susan Michaels

Band: Gibberish (Kira Ott  (fiddle); Jeff Spero  (Keyboard, Bass); Jimmy Murphy  (Guitar, Mandolin)

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Sunday, October 20 – 6:30-9:30pm (6:00pm instruction)

Santa Barbara Contradance (SBCDS)

Carrillo Recreation Center

100 E Carrillo St, Santa Barbara, CA 93101

Caller: Jon Southard

Band: Rhythm Method - Brin Bandy (fiddle), Emil Olguin (guitar), Steve Shapiro (tenor banjo, mandolin, fiddle)

SEPTEMBER 17th, 2015

A WEEKEND OF CONTRADANCE

Thursday, September 17 - 8:00pm-11:00pm

CONTRAversial

Balch Auditorium, Scripps College

1030 N. Columbia Ave., Claremont, CA 91711

Caller: Becky Nankivell

Band: Tom Sauber and Contraband (Laura Osborn, Steve Lewis

Friday, September 18 - 8:00pm - 11:00pm (7:00pm= light supper; 7:30pm – instruction)

3rd Friday Contradance (CDC)

War Memorial Building

435 Fair Oaks South Pasadena, South Pasadena, CA 91030

Caller: Ginger Alberti

Band: High Strung String Band (Belinda Thom, fiddle - James Flaherty, banjo - David Hostetler, guitar

Saturday, September 19 – 8:00pm-11:00pm (7:30pm – instruction (dance free to new dancers who attend lesson)

Third Saturday Contradance (CDC)

Woman's Club of South Pasadena

1424 Fremont Ave, South Pasadena, CA 91030

Caller: Jeremy Korr

Band: Bonnie Insull (flute), Frank Hopppe (fiddle), and Jeffrey Spero (keyboard)

Sunday, September 20 – 4:00-7:00pm (3:30pm instruction)

Contra Pedro (CDC)

People's Yoga, Health & Dance / People's Place & Palace

365 W 6th St, San Pedro, CA 90731

Caller: Susan Michaels

Band: jibberish (Kira Ott  (fiddle); Jeff Spero  (Keyboard, Bass); Jimmy Murphy  (Guitar, Mandolin)

-----

Sunday, September 20 – 6:30-9:30pm (6:00pm instruction)

Santa Barbara Contradance (SBCDS)

Carrillo Recreation Center

100 E Carrillo St, Santa Barbara, CA 93101

Caller: Jon Southard

Band: Rhythm Method - Brin Bandy (fiddle), Emil Olguin (guitar), Steve Shapiro (tenor banjo, mandolin, fiddle)

SANTA BARBARA OLD TIME FIDDLERS CONVENTION

The Santa Barbara Old Time Fiddlers Convention will be held on Sunday, October 11, 2015 from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. at Stow House in Goleta, just north of Santa Barbara. The headline entertainment this year is the Kathy Kallick Band. It's extremely important that we continue to support this event, which has been going for 44 years, as attendees and as contestants. Contestants are needed at all levels: beginning, intermediate and advanced players in banjo, fiddle, mandolin, guitar, and "other instruments." Signups are at the gate, and the contest rules, a few of which may be new this year, can be found on their web site.

A WEEKEND OF CONTRADANCE

CONTRAversial

Thursday, September 17

Balch Auditorium, Scripps College

1030 N. Columbia Ave., Claremont, CA 91711

Caller: Becky Nankivell

Band: Tom Sauber and Contraband (Laura Osborn, Steve Lewis

Friday, September 18 - 8:00pm - 11:00pm (7:00pm= light supper; 7:30pm – instruction)

3rd Friday Contradance (CDC)

War Memorial Building

435 Fair Oaks South Pasadena, South Pasadena, CA 91030

Caller: Ginger Alberti

Band: High Strung String Band (Belinda Thom, fiddle - James Flaherty, banjo - David Hostetler, guitar

Saturday, September 19 – 8:00pm-11:00pm (7:30pm – instruction (dance free to new dancers who attend lesson)

Third Saturday Contradance (CDC)

Woman's Club of South Pasadena

1424 Fremont Ave, South Pasadena, CA 91030

Caller: Jeremy Korr

Band: Bonnie Insull (flute), Frank Hopppe (fiddle), and Jeffrey Spero (keyboard)

Sunday, October 20 – 4:00-7:00pm (3:30pm instruction)

Contra Pedro (CDC)

People's Yoga, Health & Dance / People's Place & Palace

365 W 6th St, San Pedro, CA 90731

Caller: Susan Michaels

Band: Gibberish (Kira Ott  (fiddle); Jeff Spero  (Keyboard, Bass); Jimmy Murphy  (Guitar, Mandolin)

-----

Sunday, October 20 – 6:30-9:30pm (6:00pm instruction)

Santa Barbara Contradance (SBCDS)

Carrillo Recreation Center

100 E Carrillo St, Santa Barbara, CA 93101

Caller: Jon Southard

Band: Rhythm Method - Brin Bandy (fiddle), Emil Olguin (guitar), Steve Shapiro (tenor banjo, mandolin, fiddle)

SEPTEMBER 15th, 2015

A WEEKEND OF CONTRADANCE

CONTRAversial

Thursday, September 17

Balch Auditorium, Scripps College

1030 N. Columbia Ave., Claremont, CA 91711

Caller: Becky Nankivell

Band: Tom Sauber and Contraband (Laura Osborn, Steve Lewis

Friday, September 18 - 8:00pm - 11:00pm (7:00pm= light supper; 7:30pm – instruction)

3rd Friday Contradance (CDC)

War Memorial Building

435 Fair Oaks South Pasadena, South Pasadena, CA 91030

Caller: Ginger Alberti

Band: High Strung String Band (Belinda Thom, fiddle - James Flaherty, banjo - David Hostetler, guitar

Saturday, September 19 – 8:00pm-11:00pm (7:30pm – instruction (dance free to new dancers who attend lesson)

Third Saturday Contradance (CDC)

Woman's Club of South Pasadena

1424 Fremont Ave, South Pasadena, CA 91030

Caller: Jeremy Korr

Band: Bonnie Insull (flute), Frank Hopppe (fiddle), and Jeffrey Spero (keyboard)

Sunday, October 20 – 4:00-7:00pm (3:30pm instruction)

Contra Pedro (CDC)

People's Yoga, Health & Dance / People's Place & Palace

365 W 6th St, San Pedro, CA 90731

Caller: Susan Michaels

Band: Gibberish (Kira Ott  (fiddle); Jeff Spero  (Keyboard, Bass); Jimmy Murphy  (Guitar, Mandolin)

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Sunday, October 20 – 6:30-9:30pm (6:00pm instruction)

Santa Barbara Contradance (SBCDS)

Carrillo Recreation Center

100 E Carrillo St, Santa Barbara, CA 93101

Caller: Jon Southard

Band: Rhythm Method - Brin Bandy (fiddle), Emil Olguin (guitar), Steve Shapiro (tenor banjo, mandolin, fiddle)

SANTA BARBARA OLD TIME FIDDLERS CONVENTION

The Santa Barbara Old Time Fiddlers Convention will be held on Sunday, October 11, 2015 from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. at Stow House in Goleta, just north of Santa Barbara. The headline entertainment this year is the Kathy Kallick Band. It's extremely important that we continue to support this event, which has been going for 44 years, as attendees and as contestants. Contestants are needed at all levels: beginning, intermediate and advanced players in banjo, fiddle, mandolin, guitar, and "other instruments." Signups are at the gate, and the contest rules, a few of which may be new this year, can be found on their web site.

A WEEKEND OF CONTRADANCE

CONTRAversial

Thursday, September 17

Balch Auditorium, Scripps College

1030 N. Columbia Ave., Claremont, CA 91711

Caller: Becky Nankivell

Band: Tom Sauber and Contraband (Laura Osborn, Steve Lewis

Friday, September 18 - 8:00pm - 11:00pm (7:00pm= light supper; 7:30pm – instruction)

3rd Friday Contradance (CDC)

War Memorial Building

435 Fair Oaks South Pasadena, South Pasadena, CA 91030

Caller: Ginger Alberti

Band: High Strung String Band (Belinda Thom, fiddle - James Flaherty, banjo - David Hostetler, guitar

Saturday, September 19 – 8:00pm-11:00pm (7:30pm – instruction (dance free to new dancers who attend lesson)

Third Saturday Contradance (CDC)

Woman's Club of South Pasadena

1424 Fremont Ave, South Pasadena, CA 91030

Caller: Jeremy Korr

Band: Bonnie Insull (flute), Frank Hopppe (fiddle), and Jeffrey Spero (keyboard)

Sunday, October 20 – 4:00-7:00pm (3:30pm instruction)

Contra Pedro (CDC)

People's Yoga, Health & Dance / People's Place & Palace

365 W 6th St, San Pedro, CA 90731

Caller: Susan Michaels

Band: Gibberish (Kira Ott  (fiddle); Jeff Spero  (Keyboard, Bass); Jimmy Murphy  (Guitar, Mandolin)

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Sunday, October 20 – 6:30-9:30pm (6:00pm instruction)

Santa Barbara Contradance (SBCDS)

Carrillo Recreation Center

100 E Carrillo St, Santa Barbara, CA 93101

Caller: Jon Southard

Band: Rhythm Method - Brin Bandy (fiddle), Emil Olguin (guitar), Steve Shapiro (tenor banjo, mandolin, fiddle)

SEPTEMBER 10th, 2015

SANTA BARBARA OLD TIME FIDDLERS CONVENTION

The Santa Barbara Old Time Fiddlers Convention will be held on Sunday, October 11, 2015 from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. at Stow House in Goleta, just north of Santa Barbara. The headline entertainment this year is the Kathy Kallick Band. It's extremely important that we continue to support this event, which has been going for 44 years, as attendees and as contestants. Contestants are needed at all levels: beginning, intermediate and advanced players in banjo, fiddle, mandolin, guitar, and "other instruments." Signups are at the gate, and the contest rules, a few of which may be new this year, can be found on their web site.

AUGUST 22ND, 2015

RIZWAN-MUAZZAM QAWWALI

At Grand Performances on Saturday, August 22, 8:00pm, 5th generation torchbearers of the Qawwali tradition, these brothers’ imaginative reinterpretation of classic Sufi texts is a transcendent experience; a rare performance not to be missed. DJ and producer Neil Sparkes joins Rizwan-Muazzam for a special guest set described as “a bewitching blend of dance-floor devotional music.” .

AUGUST 14th, 2015

The Yuval Ron Ensemble

At the Skirball Cultural Center on Thursday, August 20, 8:00pm, The Yuval Ron Ensemble will be performing the concert program “My Heart Is in the East: Mystical Music and Dance of the Hebrew Tribes,” Israeli Angeleno Yuval Ron and an ensemble featuring Moroccan-Israeli vocalist Elinor Sitrish and sacred dance artist Mayaya take the stage with their intensely moving and adventurous pan–Middle Eastern music.

Formed in 1999, the Yuval Ron Ensemble includes Jewish and Christian artists who strive to create musical bridges between people of diverse faiths and ethnic backgrounds. As they pay homage to diverse Jewish cultures of Morocco, Yemen, Iraq, and Israel—from euphoric Kabbalistic Hebrew dances to fiery Sephardic-Andalusi songs—the ensemble creates a synthesis of styles that is both deeply traditional and boldly innovative.

RIP: THEODORE BIKEL (MAY 2, 1924-JULY 21, 2015)

JULY 16TH, 2015

CRY NO MORE

Above is the video for "Cry No More," a song Rhiannon wrote with her sister Lalenja Harrington in response to this tragedy. She brought together friends and band members to film the video, directed by Harvey Robinson, at the United Congregational Church in her home town of Greensboro, North Carolina.

The massacre at the Emanuel AME church in Charleston, South Carolina, is just the latest in a string of racially charged events that have broken my heart. There are a lot of things to fix in this world, but history says if we don't address this canker, centuries in the making, these things will continue to happen. No matter what level privilege you have, when the system is broken everybody loses. We all have to speak up when injustice happens. No matter what. And music is one of the best ways I know to do so. -- Rhiannon Giddens

JUNE 26TH, 2015

Summer is upon us and with that comes all the free concerts that are presented in the Los Angeles area....The Skirball Cultural Center, Grand Performances, Culver City Summer Concerts to name a few. 

Check the FolkWorks calendar on our website to mark your calendars.

Also, note that we send out a listing of what is up for the following week every Thursday when you sign up for  our Yahoo Group.

And, of course, we keep up to date with information on our Facebook page and group as well as our Twitter feed.

FolkWorks is supported by folks like you, so we urge you to become a member.

Here are all the important links:

FolkWorks Calendar

FolkWorks Yahoo Group

FolkWorks Facebook Page

FolkWorks Twitter Feed

FolkWorks member signup

JUNE 16TH, 2015

Iain Matthews (born Iain Matthew McDonald, 16 June 1946) is an English musician and songwriter. He was a singer with Fairport Convention, before forming his own band Matthews Southern Comfort, which had a UK number one in 1970 with a cover of Joni Mitchell's "Woodstock". Born in Scunthorpe, Lincolnshire, England, Matthews was known in the 1960s first as Ian McDonald, then as the 1960s progressed, as Ian Matthews. In 1989, he reverted to the original spelling of his first name.

Influenced by both rock and roll and folk music, he has performed mainly as a solo act, although he was a member of Fairport Convention during the early period when they were heavily influenced by American West Coast folk rock. He later had a solo career and fronted the bands Plainsong, Hi-Fi, No Grey Faith, More Than A Song and Matthews Southern Comfort. [wikipedia]

JUNE 15TH, 2015

Waylon Jennings (June 15, 1937 – February 13, 2002) was an American singer, songwriter, musician, and actor. Jennings began playing guitar at 8 and began performing at 12 on KVOW radio. His first band was The Texas Longhorns. Jennings worked as a D.J. on KVOW, KDAV, KYTI, and KLLL. In 1958, Buddy Holly arranged Jennings's first recording session, of "Jole Blon" and "When Sin Stops (Love Begins)". Holly hired him to play bass. In Clear Lake, Iowa, Jennings gave up his seat on the ill-fated flight that crashed and killed Holly, J. P. Richardson, and others. The day of the flight was later known as The Day the Music Died. Jennings then worked as a D.J. in Coolidge, Arizona, and Phoenix. He formed a rockabilly club band, The Waylors. He recorded for independent label Trend Records and A&M Records, before succeeding with RCA Victor after achieving creative control.

During the 1970s, Jennings joined the Outlaw movement. He released critically acclaimed albums Lonesome, On'ry and Mean and Honky Tonk Heroes, followed by hit albums Dreaming My Dreams and Are You Ready for the Country. In 1976 he released the album Wanted! The Outlaws with Willie Nelson, Tompall Glaser, and Jessi Colter, the first platinum country music album. That success was followed by Ol' Waylon, and the hit song "Luckenbach, Texas". By the early 1980s, Jennings was struggling with a cocaine addiction, which he quit in 1984. Later he joined the country supergroup The Highwaymen with Nelson, Kris Kristofferson, and Johnny Cash. During that period, Jennings released the successful album Will the Wolf Survive. He toured less after 1997, to spend more time with his family. Between 1999 and 2001, his appearances were limited by health problems. On February 13, 2002, Jennings died from complications of diabetes. Jennings also appeared in movies and television series. He was the balladeer for The Dukes of Hazzard; composing and singing the show's theme song. In 2001 he was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame, which he chose not to attend. In 2007 he was posthumously awarded the Cliffie Stone Pioneer Award by the Academy of Country Music. [wikipedia]

JUNE 9TH, 2015

Ronnie Gilbert (September 7, 1926 - June 6, 2015) was an American folk singer, songwriter and activist. She was one of the original members of the music quartet the Weavers, as a contralto with Pete Seeger, Lee Hays, and Fred Hellerman.

Gilbert was born in Brooklyn, New York City, daughter of Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe. Her mother, Sarah, born in Poland, was a dressmaker and trade unionist, and her father, Charles Gilbert, born in the Ukraine, was a factory worker and milliner. Gilbert came to Washington, DC during World War II. She encountered Library of Congress folklorist Alan Lomax and Woody Guthrie and other folk singers. She went to Anacostia High School. The Washington Post reported that she was almost expelled because of her resistance to participating in a minstrel show.

She performed in the early 1940s with the Priority Ramblers before founding the Weavers with Pete Seeger. Gilbert's singing was characterized as "a crystalline, bold contralto." Her voice is heard, blending with and rising over the others, in Weavers tracks such as “This Land Is Your Land ,” “If I Had a Hammer ,” “On Top of Old Smoky ,” “Goodnight, Irene ,” “Kisses Sweeter than Wine ” and “Tzena, Tzena, Tzena.”

The Weavers were an influential folk-singing group that was blacklisted in the early 1950s, during a period of widespread anti-communist feeling, because of the group's left-wing sympathies. Following the Weavers' dissolution in 1953 due to the blacklist, Gilbert continued her activism on a personal level, traveling to Cuba in 1961 on a trip that brought her back to the United States on the same day that country banned travel to Cuba. She also participated in the Parisian protests of 1968 after traveling to that country to work with British theatrical director Peter Brook.

In the 1970s, Gilbert earned an MA in clinical psychology and worked as a therapist for a few years. Various well-known younger singers honor Ms. Gilbert for the example she set for them, and the influence she had on their careers, particularly Holly Near, with whom Gilbert has released three duet albums: 1983's Lifelines, 1989's Singing With You, and 1997's This Train Still Runs. Near and Gilbert also joined Arlo Guthrie and Pete Seeger for the 1984 quartet album HARP (an acronym for "Holly, Arlo, Ronnie, and Pete"). During that period Gilbert wrote and appeared in a one-woman show about Mary Harris "Mother" Jones, the American labor organizer, and in a second work based on author Studs Terkel's book Coming of Age.

In 1992 she accompanied the Vancouver Men's Chorus on the song Music in My Mother's House from their album Signature. In 1991, Gilbert recorded "Lincoln and Liberty" and "When Johnny Comes Marching Home" for the compilation album, Songs of the Civil War, joining artists such as Kathy Mattea, Judy Collins, John Hartford, Hoyt Axton, and the United States Military Academy Band of West Point. “ Songs are dangerous, songs are subversive and can change your life. ” —Ronnie Gilbert, on the effects of hearing Paul Robeson sing when she was 10.

Gilbert continued to tour and appear in plays, folk festivals, and Jewish music festivals well into her 80s. She also continued her protest work, participating in groups such as Women in Black to protest "Israeli occupation of Palestinian territories."

In 2006, the Weavers received a Lifetime Achievement Award at the Grammys. Gilbert and Hellerman accepted the award. Seeger was unable to attend the ceremony, and Hays had died in 1981. [wikipedia]

MAY 27TH, 2015

Jean Ritchie (December 8, 1922 – June 1, 2015) was an American folk music singer, songwriter, and Appalachian dulcimer player. Jean Ritchie was born to Abigail (née Hall) and Balis W. Ritchie of Viper, an unincorporated community in Perry County in the Cumberland Mountains of south eastern Kentucky. The Ritchies of Perry County were one of the two "great ballad-singing families" of Kentucky celebrated among folk song scholars (the other was the Combs family of adjacent Knott County, whose repertoire formed the basis of a the first scholarly work on the British ballads in America, a doctoral thesis by Professor Josiah Combs of Berea College for the Sorbonne University published in Paris in 1925.) In 1917, the great collector Cecil Sharp collected songs from Jean's older sisters Una and May. Many of the Ritchies attended the Hindman Settlement School, a folk school, where people were encouraged to cherish their own backgrounds and where Sharp also found many of his songs. Jean's father Balis had printed up a book of old songs entitled Lovers' Melodies, and music making was an important activity in the Ritchie home. Jean's forebears had fought in the Revolutionary War in 1776 before settling in Kentucky, and most of them later fought on the Confederate Side in the Civil War. Her grandfather Justice Austin Ritchie was 2nd Lieutenant of Company C of the 13th Kentucky Confederate Cavalry. Alan Lomax wrote that: They were quiet, thoughtful folks, who went in for ballads, big families and educating their children. Jean's grandmother was a prime mover in the Old Regular Baptist Church, and all the traditional hymn tunes came from her. Jean's Uncle Jason was a lawyer, who remembers the big ballads like "Lord Barnard." Jean's father taught school, printed a newspaper, fitted specs, farmed and sent ten of his fourteen children to college. As the youngest of 14 siblings, Jean was one of ten girls who slept in one room of the farming family's farm house. She was quick to memorize songs and, with Chalmers and Velma McDaniels, performed at local dances and at county fairs, where they repeatedly won blue ribbons in Hazard, the county seat. Jean recalls that when the family acquired a radio in the late 1940s they discovered that what they had been singing was hillbilly music, a word they had never heard before. Ritchie graduated high school in Viper and enrolled in Cumberland Junior College (now a four-year University of the Cumberlands) in Williamsburg, Kentucky, and from there went on to graduate Phi Beta Kappa with a B.A. in social work from the University of Kentucky, in Lexington in 1946. At college she participated in the glee club and choir and learned to play piano. During World War II, she taught in elementary school. After graduating she got a job as a social worker at the Henry Street Settlement, where she taught music to children. There she befriended Alan Lomax, who recorded her extensively for the Library of Congress. She joined the New York folksong scene and met Lead Belly, Pete Seeger, and Oscar Brand In 1948 she shared the stage with The Weavers, Woody Guthrie, and Betty Sanders at the Spring Fever Hootenanny and by October 1949 was a regular guest on Oscar Brand's Folksong Festival radio show on WNYC.[citation needed] In 1949 and 1950, she recorded several hours of songs, stories, and oral history for Lomax in New York City. Elektra records signed her and released three albums: Jean Ritchie Sings (1952), Songs of Her Kentucky Mountain Family (1957) and A Time for Singing (1962). [wikipedia]

MAY 27TH, 2015

Len Chandler (May 27, 1935) is an American folk musician. In the early 1960s, Chandler began to get involved in the Civil Rights Movement. He sang at demonstrations and rallies, and won a reputation as a protest songwriter. One of his most famous songs was "Beans in My Ears", which was covered by the Serendipity Singers, as well as Pete Seeger. He also served as one of the original crew members of Seeger's CLEARWATER organization in working to save the environment around the Hudson River Valley. Chandler was also a performer in the traveling anti-war troupe F.T.A., which was organized by Jane Fonda in 1971. With Holly Near and Rita Martinson, the group toured the United States and bases throughout the Pacific Rim. The travels were filmed, however the documentary was pulled from theatres a week after its release due to the controversy surrounding Fonda's visit to Hanoi. After penning topical material related to the Original Black Panther Party, he began writing three topical songs a day for the KRLA radio program, The Credibility Gap, which released some of his songs, including "Soul in Ice", on their record An Album Of Political Pornography. At KRLA he also wrote and recorded the short theme song "The Chronicles of Pop" for the Pop Chronicles radio program. In the early 1970s, he formed the Alternative Chorus-Songwriters Showcase to promote new talent. He moved to Los Angeles in the mid-1970s. Len Chandlers' song "Keep On Keepin' On" of 1964 was used by Martin Luther King Jr. in a speech after King's secretary saw the song in New York Broadside issue 34. [wikipedia]

May 20, 2015

FolkWorks extends a big hand to all the participants of the 2015 Topanga Banjo-Fiddle Contest. It was a perfect day.

Congratulations to Larry Wines who was this years Legend Award Winner. See below.

Band

1.     The EM Band, Woodland Hills

2.     The New Historians, Pasadena

3.     New Roads, Santa Monica

Traditional Banjo - Advanced

1.     Andy Roberts, Mariposa

2.     Ken Leiboff, Newbury Park

3.     Laura Osborne, Glendale

Traditional Banjo - Intermediate

1.     Mark Thompson, Buena Park

2.     Scott Vilhauer, Torrance

Traditional Banjo - Beginning

1.     Milena Reed, Culver City

2.     Kimberly Brandel, Seal Beach

3.     Ashley Atkinson, Los Angeles

Bluegrass Banjo - Advanced

1.     Dennis Nowack, San Diego

2.     Jack O'Shea, Santa Barbara

3.     Casey James Holmberg, Culver City

Bluegrass Banjo - Intermediate

1.     Mason Unthank, Santa Clarita

2.     Aaron Wardell, Marlow, NH

3.     William Rigert, Lancaster

Bluegrass Banjo - Beginning

1.     Heidi Lindblom, Huntington Beach

2.     Scotty Lomaglio, Castaic

3.     Piper Keesee, Toluca Lake

Fiddle - Advanced

1.     Aarun Carter, Portland, OR

2.     Grant Wheeler, Los Angeles

3.     Anya Sturm, Santa Monica

4.     Honorable Mention: Joyce Pan, Burbank

Fiddle - Intermediate

1.     Lucas Braun, Los Angeles

2.     Shira Ellisman, Encinitas

3.     Sofia Miranda, Los Angeles

4.     Honorable Mention: Jonathan Shifflett, Los Angeles

Fiddle - Beginning

1.     Michael Paller, Los Angeles

2.     Charlotte Bradley-McKinnon, Pasadena

3.     Cassidy Mahoney, Redondo Beach

Mandolin - Advanced

1.     Roland Sturm, Santa Monica

2.     Jonathan Trawick, Portland, OR

3.     Calvin Anderson, Huntington Beach

Mandolin - Intermediate

1.     Bill Birrell, Santa Monica

2.     Aarun Carter, Portland, OR

3.     Robert Wheeler IV, Corona

Mandolin - Beginning

1.     Vincent Green, Los Angeles

2.     David Omerod, Bakersfield

3.     Claire Masters, Valencia

Flat-Picking Guitar - Advanced

1.     Nathan La Franchi, San Clemente

2.     Calvin Anderson, Huntington Beach

3.     Jonathan Trawick, Portland, OR

Flat-Picking Guitar - Intermediate

1.     Sean Conlon, San Pedro

2.     Fred Miller, Newbury Park

3.     John Drake, Fountain Valley

Flat-Picking Guitar - Beginning

1.     Matthew St. Claire, Bakersfield

2.     Michael Koscelnick, Bell Gardens

Finger-Style Guitar

1.     Craig Lincoln, Woodland Hills

2.     Jill Fenimore, Los Angeles

3.     Richard Marchetta, Valencia

4.     Honorable Mention: Jeff Greenman, La Mirada

Other Instruments

1.     Ken Leiboff, Newbury Park [Harmonica]

2.     Chris Teuber, Venice [Harmonica]

3.     Diane Ippel, Ventura [Hammered Dulcimer]

4.     Honorable Mention Steve Berman, Agoura Hills [Harmonica]

Singing

1.     The Emersons, Woodland Hills

2.     Harmonistas, Claremont

3.     The Three Belles, Harbor City

Best Backup Instrument

1.     Jonathan Trawick, Portland, OR [Guitar]

2.     Aarun Carter, Portland, OR [Guitar]

3.     David Aks, Granada Hills [Cello]

4.     Honorable Mention Ron Vance, Santa Monica [Bass]

Oldest Musician

Stan Shapin (1937), Orange, Advanced Traditional Banjo

Youngest Musician

Rebekah Wilson (2007), Saugus, Beginning Fiddle


LAWRENCE (LARRY) WINES - 2015 Legend Award Winner

LAWRENCE WINES is a longtime photojournalist, consultant to artists and the music industry, and events producer. His Acoustic Americana Music Guide has actively promoted thousands of individual artists, bands, tours, and festivals, including Topanga, throughout California and beyond for over 12 years. Reporting “inside music news,” it’s even a “go-to” source for other journalists. He’s acclaimed for teaching artists how to have successful experiences with the media, a key to getting traction.

He created and hosted the weekly 4-hour broadcast/simulcast radio show “Tied to the Tracks,” a multiple-award winner honored among the “Best of L.A.” winners in Los Angeles magazine. Its live interviews, performances and on-air music collaborations featured artists playing upcoming festivals, including TBFC, the Irish Faire, Cowboy Festivals, Cajun & Blues Fests, Huck Finn, Stagecoach, Live Oak, and more. Guest artists played live and talked about a festival or concert before it happened, building its audience.

He pioneered the now familiar terms “acoustic americana” and “acoustic renaissance” back in the 1990s, broadening the genre to bridge gaps between traditional Folk, Americana and younger contemporary acoustic artists, growing the audience appeal for related kinds of music.

As a photojournalist, Lawrence has convinced hardboiled editors to let him cover folk-americana and traditional music and musicians. He’s out there for online and print outlets, promoting, attending and reporting on festivals and music conferences, large and small. He’s met and interviewed iconic figures, and was writing about great bands before they gained fame, including Old Crow Medicine Show, Mumford & Sons, Hot Club of Cowtown, and many more.

He was one of the first journalists to promote Folk Alliance and actually attend and cover it. When the FAR-West Conference came to Woodland Hills, he devoted his entire four-hour radio show to live performances by its artists from all over, gaining exposure for the music and touring/performing artists.

Here at Topanga, he has been an emcee for many years. He says, “Music Legend honoree! All these trailblazers and mentors. People with passion and devotion. Grammy winners. Howard and Roz’s ‘FolkScene.&rsquo My fellow writers at ‘FolkWorks.’ Social justice musician Ross Altman. Grammy winner Richard Greene. Beth Lomax Hawes, whose own Smithsonian music work continued her famous family’s legacy. Sam Hinton and his Library of Congress recordings. Scottish fiddler Jan Tappan, last year’s honoree. Bluegrass pioneer Peter Feldmann. Elaine and Clark, so essential in spreading traditional music in California. Devoted music presenters and guiding lights Bob Stane and Russ and Julie. All the way back to the ones I never knew - Mel Durham, who launched the Old Time Fiddlers, and Dorian and Dalia Keyser, who all of us owe for making Topanga a great event. So many great folks! Such an honor. And now ME?! Wow!”

There’s more that music folks don’t know. He’s climbed mountains, rock and ice walls by new routes, and even frozen waterfalls. He recently completed a “30-states-in-30-days” train odyssey around America. He’s restored and run steam locomotives, founded historic preservation projects, and conceived and hosted the first-ever reunion of the crews of the two Freedom Trains - the Bicentennial train from 1975-76 and the original postwar train from 1947-49 that first broke the color barrier in the South (the reunion featured trips on a steam train and a paddlewheel steamboat). He’s taught in classrooms, studios and the wilderness, designed and built museum exhibits and authored educational, visitor, and interpretive plans for museums. He’s been involved in progressive politics, chairing the Democratic Coalition, co-founding Latinos for Social Justice, and editing the journal, “Democritus.” He’s written engineering standards, developed industrial processes, and done proposals for industries chasing multi-million dollar contracts. He’s done field geology and investigated ancient trees and climate.

Now, he’s immersed in preserving the only habitat of a critically endangered species in a single and quite beautiful mountain complex where all is slated to be destroyed by surface mining - “gone completely, natural rock arches, scenic beauty, species" habitat, and all. Erased from the face of the Earth and the mind of humankind.” Not if he can help it.

You can contact Lawrence about music, music promotion, or pretty much anything else at: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

MAY 19TH, 2015

The Magnolia Sisters (below) among other great bands will be featured this weekend at the Simi Valley Cajun & Blues Music Festival. Get your tickets online .... they are discounted (i.e. they will cost more at the gate. Check out the Spotlight Posters!

MAY 15TH, 2015

Folks, tonight is the 2nd night of the Old Time Social. It is a mini-festival with concerts, workshops, jams, a cakewalk and a square dance. This is followed on Sunday by Topanga Banjo Fiddle Contest. An amazing gathering that is more than a contest. There are performances on several stages, a dance pavilion with Irish, Contra and Square Dancing and lots of jamming. Check out the Spotlight Posters!

Below is Riley Baugus on guitar, Trevor Stuart on fiddle and Travis Stuart on banjo. They in addition to Sabra Guzman on bass will be playing tonight.

MAY 14TH, 2015

Folks, tonight is the start of the Old Time Social. It is a mini-festival with concerts, workshops, jams, a cakewalk and a square dance. This is followed on Sunday by Topanga Banjo Fiddle Contest. An amazing gathering that is more than a contest. There are performances on several stages, a dance pavilion with Irish, Contra and Square Dancing and lots of jamming. Check out the Spotlight Posters!

Here's one of our favorite bands who will be playing tonight.

MAY 9TH, 2015

Happy Traum (May 9, 1938) is an American folk musician who started playing music in the 1950s. Happy is most famously known as one half of Happy and Artie Traum, a duo he began with his brother. They released three albums, Happy and Artie Traum (1970, Capitol), Double Back (1971, Capitol) and Hard Times In The Country (1975, Rounder). He has continued as a solo artist and as founder of Homespun Tapes. [wikipedia]

APRIL 30TH, 2015

Reverend Gary Davis (April 30, 1896 – May 5, 1972) was a blind African American blues and gospel singer and guitarist, who was also proficient on the banjo guitar and harmonica. His finger-picking guitar style influenced many other artists and his students include Stefan Grossman, David Bromberg, Roy Book Binder, Larry Johnson, Nick Katzman, Dave Van Ronk, Rory Block, Ernie Hawkins, Larry Campbell, Bob Weir, Woody Mann, and Tom Winslow. [wikipedia]

She was born in Edinburgh to musical parents. Her mother knew many Scots songs and passed them on to Jean and her brother; her father played the hammered dulcimer. She was raised in Leven, Fife, Scotland, and later returned to Edinburgh, taking medieval studies at the university. To help pay her way through her studies, she worked as a driving instructor and undertaker's assistant.

Gary Davis was born in the Piedmont region of the country, in Laurens, South Carolina, and was the only one of eight children his mother bore who survived to adulthood. He became blind as an infant. Davis reported that his father was killed in Birmingham, Alabama, when Davis was ten, and Davis later said that he had been told that his father had been shot by the Birmingham High Sheriff. He recalled being poorly treated by his mother and that before his death his father had given him into the care of his paternal grandmother.

He took to the guitar and assumed a unique multi-voice style produced solely with his thumb and index finger, playing not only gospel, ragtime and blues tunes, but also traditional and original tunes in four-part harmony.

In the mid-1920s, Davis migrated to Durham, North Carolina, a major center for black culture at the time. There he taught Blind Boy Fuller and collaborated with a number of other artists in the Piedmont blues scene including Bull City Red.[1] In 1935, J. B. Long, a store manager with a reputation for supporting local artists, introduced Davis, Fuller and Red to the American Record Company. The subsequent recording sessions marked the real beginning of Davis' career and are available in his Complete Early Recordings. During his time in Durham, Davis converted to Christianity; in 1937, he would be ordained as a Baptist minister.[1][3] Following his conversion and especially his ordination, Davis began to express a preference for inspirational gospel music.

In the 1940s, the blues scene in Durham began to decline and Davis migrated to New York.[1] In 1951, several years before his "rediscovery", Davis's oral history was recorded by Elizabeth Lyttleton Harold (the wife of Alan Lomax) who transcribed their conversations into a 300+-page typescript. The folk revival of the 1960s re-invigorated Davis' career and included a performance at the Newport Folk Festival and having Peter, Paul and Mary record his version of "Samson and Delilah", also known as "If I Had My Way" which is originally a Blind Willie Johnson song that Davis had popularized. "Samson and Delilah" was also covered and credited to Davis on the Grateful Dead's "Terrapin Station" album. Eric Von Schmidt credits Rev. Davis with three-quarters of Schmidt's Baby, Let Me Follow You Down which Bob Dylan covered on his debut album for Columbia.[4] Blues Hall of Fame singer and harmonica player Darrell Mansfield has also recorded several of Rev. Davis' songs. Davis died in May 1972, from a heart attack in Hammonton, New Jersey.[5] He is buried in plot 68 of Rockville Cemetery in Lynbrook, Long Island, New York.

APRIL 28TH, 2015

Jean Redpath (April 28, 1937 – August 21, 2014) was a Scottish folk singer, educator and musician.

She was born in Edinburgh to musical parents. Her mother knew many Scots songs and passed them on to Jean and her brother; her father played the hammered dulcimer. She was raised in Leven, Fife, Scotland, and later returned to Edinburgh, taking medieval studies at the university. To help pay her way through her studies, she worked as a driving instructor and undertaker's assistant.

The Scottish poet and folk-song collector Hamish Henderson was working in the School of Scottish Studies at the university and Redpath took a keen interest in the archive of tapes and discs of music and songs. She learned about 400 songs, together with the oral folklore that went with them. In March 1961, at the age of 24, she went to the United States. Her first performance was in San Francisco. Later she met up with Ramblin' Jack Elliott and Bob Dylan in Greenwich Village. The natural warmth and power of her voice brought her to perform at Gerde's Folk City. In 1963, following a concert performance, she signed up with Elektra Records. In 1975 she switched to the Philo label. From 1972 to 1976 Jean was artist-in-residence at Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut. She lectured in folklore and gave talks in schools.

In 1976 Redpath embarked on a project to record all the songs of Robert Burns, some being folk songs, some Burns's own compositions, and most a mixture of the two. Twenty-two volumes were planned, but when her collaborator, the composer Serge Hovey, died after seven volumes, the project came to a premature end. Hovey had done the instrumental arrangements for 323 songs, and Redpath felt no other musician could replace him. The albums won critical praise from around the world. In 1986 she recorded Lady Nairne, a collection of songs written by Scottish women. Redpath sensitively reconstructed songs that might otherwise have been lost. Between 1974 and 1987, Redpath appeared regularly on Garrison Keillor's "A Prairie Home Companion" APM radio show. She also appeared on Robert J. Lurtsema's "Morning pro musica" broadcast from WGBH in Boston.

Redpath toured throughout the U.S. and Canada, played venues in South America, Hong Kong, and Australia, including the Sydney Opera House, and performed often at the Edinburgh Folk Festival. In 1977, Royal Jubilee Year, Redpath appeared at a royal banquet at Edinburgh Castle for Queen Elizabeth II.

Starting in 1979, Redpath was a lecturer at the University of Stirling, Scotland, with occasional trips to teach at Wesleyan University. She gave courses for ten years in Scottish Song at the Heritage of Scotland Summer School at the University of Stirling.

APRIL 27TH, 2015

Herb Pedersen (April 27, 1944) is an American musician, guitarist, banjo player, and singer-songwriter who has played a variety of musical styles over the past forty years including country, bluegrass, progressive bluegrass, folk, folk rock, country rock, and has worked with numerous musicians in many different bands. Pedersen often performs with Chris Hillman, and both were once members of the Desert Rose Band. Pedersen also fronted his own band called the Laurel Canyon Ramblers. Besides this, Pedersen has also worked with the following musicians and groups: Pine Valley Boys,Michael Martin Murphey, Earl Scruggs, The Dillards, Smokey Grass Boys, The New Kentucky Colonels, Old And In The Way, David Grisman, Peter Rowan, Vassar Clements, Gram Parsons, Emmylou Harris, Skip Battin, Tony Rice, Dan Fogelberg, Stephen Stills, Linda Ronstadt, Kris Kristofferson, John Prine, Jackson Browne, John Denver, John Jorgenson, and Leland Sklar, among others. [wikipedia]

APRIL 26TH, 2015

No catchphrases…..just the real deal. The Fontenot Cajun Creole Band plays for the love of traditional styles of the music of our culture. The group has sprung up from get togethers in Mr Joe’s back room over strong coffee, laughs , and pots simmering on the stove. We play because we love the music and our culture. Many Louisiana creoles came to the west coast for work after the war and formed communities in Los Angeles and San Francisco. Mr Joe “Sands” Fontenot, on accordion, was born outside of Mamou and raised in L’Anse Grise, Louisiana and moved to Los Angeles seeking work. He brought his music with him like many creoles. In the tradition of Danny Poullard in the bay area and Joe Simien in Los Angeles, Mr Joe carries on the tradition of practicing and keeping the culture alive by playing and extending the music to those that come and sit with him in that practice room at the back of the house. Just like those before him it is all about the feel of the music and passing it on by ear. He will be the last to tell you but his relations are strong in the french creole music tradition as his cousins continue to play on stages and festivals back home. Guy Martin, on fiddle, was born in New Orleans to a creole mother who spoke french first. He spent time in his early years listening to his Avoyelles Parish born creole grandfather play the fiddle as well as learning Louisiana French from his family. In college he was fortunate to have his ears seasoned on the live playing of Dewey Balfa as well as Steve Riley and the Mamou Playboys while working at Mulatte’s cajun restaurant. He feels lucky to continue playing tunes under the guidance of Mr. Joe. Carolyn Russell brings her depth of experience and feel of playing with Wilfred Latour and Joe Simien internationally. She was instrumental in bringing much of cajun and creole music to Southern California.

APRIL 23RD, 2015

With more than 25 years of experience with cultures and drumming of the Middle East and Mediterranean, Rowan Storm is recognized internationally as a performer and educator. Rowan brings freshness to tradition with her teaching method and frame drum designs, including the Thinline Frame Drums by Remo and her signature Rowan Storm Dayereh by Cooperman, now also produced by Remo. With a parallel study of brain function and wellness, Rowan is pioneering the symmetrical frame drum position. The shallow depth of Rowan's Frame Drum designs enables both hands to play all the strokes, while holding the drum equally with both hands. As the non-dominant hand is called into action, the rational is harmonized with the intuitive, and startling new sources of creativity are unleashed. Throughout the US, Europe and the Middle East, Rowan has studied and performed with some of the greatest masters of Middle Eastern music. Maintaining a full international concert and workshop schedule, Rowan plays and teaches a wide vocabulary of drumming styles, and sings in several languages. Based on walking, Rowan's teaching method connects us deeply with our innate rhythmical nature while promoting balance between both brain hemispheres.

APRIL 22ND, 2015

“Banjo Gal” Donna Lynn Caskey honors folk tradition while taking it to sometimes edgy new places. Her debut album, Nameless Heart, consists of twelve, timeless-sounding original songs featuring clawhammer banjo. Grammy-nominated producer Mark Hallman (Carole King, Ani DiFranco, Eliza Gilkyson) adds just the right amount of vocals, percussion, guitar, bass, bouzouki, piano and studio warmth to tastefully support Donna Lynn and her classic yet boundary-stretching sound. Stretching boundaries comes naturally to Donna Lynn, who received a scholarship for an intensive beginning banjo class at the John C. Campbell Folk School in Brasstown, North Carolina shortly before leaving her hometown on the coast of Virginia by train for California in 2001. She began writing songs and playing shows three months later. Her heartfelt, engaging performances can inspire audiences to sing along, to weep at a soul-stirring ballad, and to laugh at playful one-liners amidst occasional bouts of tuning.

APRIL 21ST, 2015

Tracy Newman> is MC for this years FolkWorks Benefit Concert. She is the lead singer/songwriter of the folk music band Tracy Newman and the Reinforcements. In 2007, she released the album A Place in the Sun. Her second album, I Just See You, was released in 2012. Her third album, I Can Swing Forever was released in 2014. It is for children. It was released with a coloring book done by Tracy's daughter, Charlotte Dean [Wikipedia]

APRIL 14TH, 2015

Doris Leon "D. L." Menard (April 14, 1932) was born in Erath, Louisiana. The only child[3] of Mr. Ophy Menard and Mrs. Helena Primeaux Menard. He was part of a Cajun farming family. He started to play guitar at 16 and started playing dances in Louisiana clubs at 17. He was greatly influenced by Hank Williams meeting him once in 1951 at the Teche Club shortly before Hank's death. Since then he has performed in more than 30 countries and served as a good-will ambassador for Cajun culture. He has also recorded with non-Cajun artists, including Bryan Ferry. He and his wife Louella - now deceased - have seven children, seventeen grandchildren, and one great-grandchild. He still lives in Erath and continues to play music. He has maintained a separate career as a craftsman, noted for his handmade ash-wood chairs he makes at his one-man factory in Erath.

APRIL 11TH, 2015

Toulouse Engelhardt, (born April 14, 1951, Milwaukee, Wisconsin) is an acoustic guitarist, recording artist, and was the last member of the Takoma Seven. The Takoma Seven was a group of finger style guitarists who recorded for Takoma Records from 1959-1976. Both John Fahey and Leo Kottke were his label mates.(6) It was this group of finger style guitarists that brought about a subsequent resurgence in the acoustic guitar movement that is still evidenced today. During his career, Engelhardt has been noted for his work by Guitar Player Magazine in their Reader's Poll nomination for Best Acoustic Finger Style Guitarist. He was the Silver Medal Winner of the Winter Equinox Award at the Virgin Island Film Festival. He was also awarded Best Jazz Artist at the Orange County Music Awards and is listed in the 100 Most Distinguished Guitarists of 2011.

APRIL 9TH, 2015

Mance Lipscomb (April 9, 1895 - January 30, 1976) was an American blues singer, guitarist and songster. Born Beau De Glen Lipscomb near Navasota, Texas, United States, he as a youth took the name of 'Mance' from a friend of his oldest brother Charlie.[Wikipedia]

Lipscomb was born April 9, 1895 to an ex-slave father from Alabama and a half Native American (Choctaw) mother.[2][3] Lipscomb spent most of his life working as a tenant farmer in Texas and was "discovered" and recorded by Mack McCormick and Chris Strachwitz in 1960 during the country blues revival. He released many albums of blues, ragtime, Tin Pan Alley and folk music (most of them on Strachwitz' Arhoolie label),[1] singing and accompanying himself on acoustic guitar. He had a "dead-thumb" finger-picking guitar technique, and an expressive voice. Lipscomb often honed his skills by playing in nearby Brenham, Texas, with a blind musician, Sam Rogers. His debut release was Texas Songster (1960). Lipscomb performed old songs like "Sugar Babe," the first song he ever learned, to pop numbers like "Shine On, Harvest Moon" and "It's a Long Way to Tipperary".

Trouble in Mind was recorded in 1961 and released by Reprise Records.[5] In May 1963, Lipscomb appeared at the first Monterey Folk Festival in California.

Unlike many of his contemporaries, he did not record in the early blues era, but his life is well documented thanks to his autobiography, I Say Me for a Parable: The Oral Autobiography of Mance Lipscomb, Texas Bluesman, narrated to Glen Alyn, which was published posthumously, and also a short 1971 documentary by Les Blank, A Well Spent Life.

He began playing guitar early on and played regularly for years at local gatherings, mostly what he called "Saturday Night Suppers" hosted by someone in the area. These gatherings were hosted regularly for a while by himself and his wife. The majority of his musical activity took place within what he called his "precinct", meaning the local area around Navasota, until around 1960.

Following his "discovery" by McCormick and Strachwitz, Lipscomb became an important figure in the folk music revival of the 1960s. He was a regular performer at folk festivals and folk-blues clubs around the United States, notably the Ash Grove in Los Angeles, CA.[Wikipedia] He died in Navasota in 1976, two years after suffering a stroke.

APRIL 2ND, 2015

Emmylou Harris (born April 2, 1947) is an American singer and songwriter. She has released many popular albums and singles over the course of her career, and has now won 13 Grammys – as of 2015 – as well as numerous other awards. Her work and recordings include work as a solo artist, bandleader, an interpreter of other composers' works and as a singer-songwriter, and a backing vocalist and duet partner. She has worked with numerous leading artists including Gram Parsons, John Denver, Linda Ronstadt, Dolly Parton, Roy Orbison, The Band, Mark Knopfler, Delbert McClinton, Guy Clark, Willie Nelson, Bob Dylan, Bright Eyes, Rodney Crowell, John Prine, Neil Young, and Steve Earle. [wikipedia]

MARCH 27TH, 2015

Patrick Ball (March 27, 1950) was born and raised in California and gave little thought to such things as where his ancestors came from. He went to school and supposed, when he thought about it at all, that he would one day be a lawyer, like his father. But he studied music from time to time and over the years developed a nodding acquaintance with the piano and the guitar. At university he continued his flirtatious relationship with music by playing the tin whistle, principally to annoy his roommate. But at this time he found that he was irresistibly drawn to words, to the music of words, to writers who made words sing, to writers from Ireland. Then, when he began to study history to fulfill his academic requirements, he was not surprised to find that it was the lyrical, turbulent history of Ireland that engaged him. So much so, in fact, that when his father died all his thoughts of law school died with him. He enrolled in graduate school and soon made his way to Ireland. There he fell in love with the eloquence and fire of the Irish oral tradition. There he fell in love with the Celtic harp. And there a few pieces of his life fell into place. For he came to know that marvelous unity of Irish words, music and history that would become his passion and, eventually, his livelihood.

Patrick returned to California, was awarded a Master's Degree in History by Dominican College, and soon discovered that jobs in the field of Irish scholarship were not to be had for love nor money. So after laboring in various unrewarding lines of work he set off hitchhiking around the country and finally fetched up at Penland School of Crafts in the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina, where he lived for two years and worked as a groundsman. There he encountered a branch of that living oral tradition that had captivated him in Ireland. And there for him, among the Appalachian storytellers, his love of the spoken word was rekindled. 

He now tours extensively throughout the United States and Canada, is considered one of the premier Celtic harpers and storytellers in the world today, and has recorded nine instrumental and three spoken word albums which have sold well over one-half million copies collectively and earned national awards in both the music and spoken word categories. Along with Celtic Harp and Story, his beguiling blend of music and spoken word concerts, Patrick has also written and currently performs two solo musical theater pieces: O’Carolan’s Farewell to Music, which brings to the stage the legendary life, the turbulent times and the glorious music of Ireland's most celebrated and beloved musician, Turlough O’Carolan, and The Fine Beauty of the Island, a musical journey to Ireland's legendary Blasket Islands in search of a deeply haunting tune and the vanished islanders who played it.

Patrick has been awarded grants for his work by the Zellerbach Family Fund and the California Arts Council and is the recipient of the Circle of Excellence Award from the National Storytelling Association. [www.patrickball.com]

MARCH 26TH, 2015

Jerry Silverman (3/26/1931) is an American folksinger, guitar teacher and author of music books. He has had over 200 books published, which have sold in the millions, including folk song collections, anthologies and method books for the guitar, banjo and fiddle. He has taught guitar to hundreds of students. He is currently a folk performer and lecturer at schools, universities and concert halls in the U.S. and abroad.

Silverman's best-selling books are The Folk Song Encyclopedia (a two-volume compilation of over 1,000 folk songs; words, music and guitar chords), Ballads and Songs of the Civil War (piano-vocal with guitar chords), The Guitar Player’s Guide and Almanac (a combined method book and survey of musical, technical and anecdotal information), Of Thee I Sing (patriotic American songs from the Revolutionary War to the present), The Baseball Songbook and The Undying Flame: Ballads and Songs of the Holocaust. The latter book required 9 years of research to recover many songs that were never written to paper. It contains 110 songs in 16 languages - Yiddish, German, Hebrew, Spanish, French, Dutch, Italian, Ladino, Serbo-Croatian, Greek, Norwegian, Czech, Polish, Russian, Hungarian and English. The songs include the works of concentration camp prisoners and inhabitants of the ghettos of Eastern Europe as well anti-Fascist anthems inspired by the Spanish Civil War, Red Army songs and songs of Resistance fighters. Silverman's most recent book, New York Sings, was reviewed by long-time friend and colleague Pete Seeger. Seeger and Silverman were both editors at Sing Out! A Folk Music Magazine in the 1960s.  [wikipedia]

MARCH 25TH, 2015

Mel Lyman (March 24, 1938 – March 1978) In 1963 Lyman joined Jim Kweskin’s Boston-based jug band as a banjo and harmonica player. Lyman, once called "the Grand Old Man of the 'blues' harmonica in his mid-twenties", is remembered in folk music circles for playing a 20 minute improvisation on the traditional hymn "Rock of Ages" at the end of the 1965 Newport Folk Festival to the riled crowd streaming out after Bob Dylan’s famous appearance with an electric band. Some felt that Lyman, primarily an acoustic musician, was delivering a wordless counterargument to Dylan’s new-found rock direction. Irwin Silber, editor of Sing Out Magazine, wrote that Lyman’s "mournful and lonesome harmonica" provided "the most optimistic note of the evening".  [wikipedia]

MARCH 24TH, 2015

Mel Lyman (March 24, 1938 – March 1978) In 1963 Lyman joined Jim Kweskin’s Boston-based jug band as a banjo and harmonica player. Lyman, once called "the Grand Old Man of the 'blues' harmonica in his mid-twenties",[4] is remembered in folk music circles for playing a 20 minute improvisation on the traditional hymn "Rock of Ages" at the end of the 1965 Newport Folk Festival to the riled crowd streaming out after Bob Dylan’s famous appearance with an electric band. Some felt that Lyman, primarily an acoustic musician, was delivering a wordless counterargument to Dylan’s new-found rock direction. Irwin Silber, editor of Sing Out Magazine, wrote that Lyman’s "mournful and lonesome harmonica" provided "the most optimistic note of the evening".  [wikipedia]

MARCH 21ST, 2015

Dan Crary will be appearing at the Temecula Bluegrass Festival

MARCH 19TH, 2015

New Orleans Mardi Gras Indians, St. Joseph's Night, 2014

HAPPY St. PADDY'S DAY
MARCH 17TH, 2015

TRADITIONAL IRISH MUSIC FOR
ST. PADDY’S DAY

11:00am               BRILLIANT GYPSIES

                Griffins of Kinsale

                1001 Mission St., South Pasadena, CA 91030

                626-799-0926

1:00pm THE PRATIES

                Joxer Daly’s

                11168 Washington Blvd., Culver City, CA 90323

                310-838-3745

1:00pm KEN O’MALLEY DUO

                Finn McCool’s

                2702 Main St., Santa Monica, CA 90405

                310-452-1734

2:00pm PLOUGHBOYS CELTIC

                Tam O’Shanter

                2980 Los Feliz Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90039

                323-664-0228 

5:00pm OXALIS

                Joxer Daly’s

                11168 Washington Blvd., Culver City, CA 90323

                310-838-3745

5:30pm THE PRATIES

                The Wilde Thistle

                3454 Motor Ave., West Los Angeles, CA 980034

                310-730-6208

5:30pm KEN O’MALLEY

                Griffins of Kinsale

                1001 Mission St., South Pasadena, CA 91030

                626-799-0926

5:30pm MARIAN THOMAS GRIFFITH & THE BRACKEN BAND

                Finn McCool’s

                2702 Main St., Santa Monica, CA 90405

                310-452-1734 

6:00pm RICHÁRD BERNARD, SUSAN CRAIG WINSBERG, GEE RABE & MIAMON MILLER

                Matt Denny’s Ale House

                145 E. Huntington Dr., Arcadia, CA 91006-3212

                626-462-0250 

7:00pm BRILLIANT GYPSIES

                RedWhite+Bluezz

                37 S El Molino Ave, Pasadena, CA 91101’

                626-792-4441

7:00pm RAMBLING HOUSE BAND

                Molly Malone’s

                575 S. Fairfax Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90036

                323-935-1577

7:30pm WHISKEY SUNDAY

                Tam O’Shanter

                2980 Los Feliz Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90039

                323-664-0228 

8:00pm SLUGGER O’TOOLE

                Story Tavern

                150 S San Fernando Blvd, Burbank, CA 91502

8:00pm PLOUGHBOYS CELTIC

                Joe’s Great American Bar & Grill

                4311 W. Magnolia Blvd., Burbank, CA 91505-2728

                818-729-0805

9:00pm KEN O’MALLEY AND THE TWILIGHT LORDS

                Ireland’s 32

                13721 Burbank Blvd. Van Nuys, CA 91401

                818-785-4031

MARCH 15TH, 2015

TRADITIONAL IRISH MUSIC FOR
ST. PADDY’S WEEKEND

Sunday, March 15, 2015

10:00am-6:00pm              CAMARILLO CELTIC FAIRE

                Constitution Park

                1287 Paseo Camarillo, Camarillo, CA 93010

                Tammy Glenn CAREGIVERS 805-658-8530

3:00pm OXALIS

                The Grove 

                189 The Grove Dr, Los Angeles, CA 90036

5:00pm THE PRATIES

                JJ Sullivan’s

                22917 Ventura Blvd, Woodland Hills, CA 91364

                828-225-7468

5:00pm KEN O’MALLEY DUO

                One Colorado Courtyard

                24 East Union St., Pasadena, CA 91103

5:00pm HARVEY SISTERS

                Brendan’s Irish Pub, Camarillo

                1755 E. Daily Dr, Camarillo, CA

                805-383-4100

Monday, March 16, 2015

7:00pm PRE-ST. PATRICK'S DAY DANCE CÉILÍ

                Mayflower Club

                11110 Victory Blvd, North Hollywood, CA 91606

                Presented by the Celtic Arts Center

Tuesday, March 17, 2015

11:00am               BRILLIANT GYPSIES

                Griffins of Kinsale

                1001 Mission St., South Pasadena, CA 91030

                626-799-0926

1:00pm THE PRATIES

                Joxer Daly’s

                11168 Washington Blvd., Culver City, CA 90323

                310-838-3745

1:00pm KEN O’MALLEY DUO

                Finn McCool’s

                2702 Main St., Santa Monica, CA 90405

                310-452-1734

2:00pm PLOUGHBOYS CELTIC

                Tam O’Shanter

                2980 Los Feliz Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90039

                323-664-0228 

5:00pm OXALIS

                Joxer Daly’s

                11168 Washington Blvd., Culver City, CA 90323

                310-838-3745

5:30pm THE PRATIES

                The Wilde Thistle

                3454 Motor Ave., West Los Angeles, CA 980034

                310-730-6208

5:30pm KEN O’MALLEY

                Griffins of Kinsale

                1001 Mission St., South Pasadena, CA 91030

                626-799-0926

6:00pm RICHÁRD BERNARD, SUSAN CRAIG WINSBERG, GEE RABE & MIAMON MILLER

                Matt Denny’s Ale House

                145 E. Huntington Dr., Arcadia, CA 91006-3212

                626-462-0250 

7:00pm BRILLIANT GYPSIES

                RedWhite+Bluezz

                37 S El Molino Ave, Pasadena, CA 91101’

                626-792-4441

7:00pm RAMBLING HOUSE BAND

                Molly Malone’s

                575 S. Fairfax Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90036

                323-935-1577

7:30pm WHISKEY SUNDAY

                Tam O’Shanter

                2980 Los Feliz Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90039

                323-664-0228 

8:00pm SLUGGER O’TOOLE

                Story Tavern

                150 S San Fernando Blvd, Burbank, CA 91502

8:00pm PLOUGHBOYS CELTIC

                Joe’s Great American Bar & Grill

                4311 W. Magnolia Blvd., Burbank, CA 91505-2728

                818-729-0805

9:00pm KEN O’MALLEY AND THE TWILIGHT LORDS

                Ireland’s 32

                13721 Burbank Blvd. Van Nuys, CA 91401

                818-7

MARCH 14TH, 2015

TRADITIONAL IRISH MUSIC FOR
ST. PADDY’S WEEKEND

Saturday, March 14, 2015

10:00am-6:00pm              CAMARILLO CELTIC FAIRE

                Constitution Park

                1287 Paseo Camarillo, Camarillo, CA 93010

                Tammy Glenn CAREGIVERS 805-658-8530

1:00pm LONG BEACH IRISH (FOR A DAY) PARADE

                Pine Ave. from 7th St. to Broadway

                Long Beach, CA

3:00pm OXALIS

                Malibu Wines 

                31740 Mulholland Hwy., Malibu, CA 90265

8:00pm TRINITY IRISH DANCE

                'The Dawn'

                Santa Clarita Performing Arts Center at College of the Canyons

                26455 Rockwell Canyon Rd., Santa Clarita, CA 91355

                661-362-5304

8:00pm PADDY KEENAN

                Irish Uillean piper

                California Institute of Technology - Beckman Auditorium

                332 South Michigan Ave., Pasadena, CA 91106

                626-395-4652

                Presented by Caltech Public Events

8:00pm CALUM MORRISON

                Tam O’Shanter

                2980 Los Feliz Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90039

                323-664-0228 

8:30pm THE PRATIES

                Corrigan’s Irish Pub

                75 E High St, Moorpark, CA 93021

                805-532-1500

10:00pm               PLOUGHBOYS CELTIC

                Joxer Daly’s

                11168 Washington Blvd., Culver City, CA 90323

                310-838-3745

Sunday, March 15, 2015

10:00am-6:00pm              CAMARILLO CELTIC FAIRE

                Constitution Park

                1287 Paseo Camarillo, Camarillo, CA 93010

                Tammy Glenn CAREGIVERS 805-658-8530

3:00pm OXALIS

                The Grove 

                189 The Grove Dr, Los Angeles, CA 90036

5:00pm THE PRATIES

                JJ Sullivan’s

                22917 Ventura Blvd, Woodland Hills, CA 91364

                828-225-7468

5:00pm KEN O’MALLEY DUO

                One Colorado Courtyard

                24 East Union St., Pasadena, CA 91103

5:00pm HARVEY SISTERS

                Brendan’s Irish Pub, Camarillo

                1755 E. Daily Dr, Camarillo, CA

                805-383-4100

Monday, March 16, 2015

7:00pm PRE-ST. PATRICK'S DAY DANCE CÉILÍ

                Mayflower Club

                11110 Victory Blvd, North Hollywood, CA 91606

                Presented by the Celtic Arts Center

Tuesday, March 17, 2015

11:00am               BRILLIANT GYPSIES

                Griffins of Kinsale

                1001 Mission St., South Pasadena, CA 91030

                626-799-0926

1:00pm THE PRATIES

                Joxer Daly’s

                11168 Washington Blvd., Culver City, CA 90323

                310-838-3745

1:00pm KEN O’MALLEY DUO

                Finn McCool’s

                2702 Main St., Santa Monica, CA 90405

                310-452-1734

2:00pm PLOUGHBOYS CELTIC

                Tam O’Shanter

                2980 Los Feliz Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90039

                323-664-0228 

5:00pm OXALIS

                Joxer Daly’s

                11168 Washington Blvd., Culver City, CA 90323

                310-838-3745

5:30pm THE PRATIES

                The Wilde Thistle

                3454 Motor Ave., West Los Angeles, CA 980034

                310-730-6208

5:30pm KEN O’MALLEY

                Griffins of Kinsale

                1001 Mission St., South Pasadena, CA 91030

                626-799-0926

6:00pm RICHÁRD BERNARD, SUSAN CRAIG WINSBERG, GEE RABE & MIAMON MILLER

                Matt Denny’s Ale House

                145 E. Huntington Dr., Arcadia, CA 91006-3212

                626-462-0250 

7:00pm BRILLIANT GYPSIES

                RedWhite+Bluezz

                37 S El Molino Ave, Pasadena, CA 91101’

                626-792-4441

7:00pm RAMBLING HOUSE BAND

                Molly Malone’s

                575 S. Fairfax Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90036

                323-935-1577

7:30pm WHISKEY SUNDAY

                Tam O’Shanter

                2980 Los Feliz Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90039

                323-664-0228 

8:00pm SLUGGER O’TOOLE

                Story Tavern

                150 S San Fernando Blvd, Burbank, CA 91502

8:00pm PLOUGHBOYS CELTIC

                Joe’s Great American Bar & Grill

                4311 W. Magnolia Blvd., Burbank, CA 91505-2728

                818-729-0805

9:00pm KEN O’MALLEY AND THE TWILIGHT LORDS

                Ireland’s 32

                13721 Burbank Blvd. Van Nuys, CA 91401

                818-7

MARCH 13TH, 2015

TRADITIONAL IRISH MUSIC FOR
ST. PADDY’S WEEKEND

Friday, March 13, 2015

8:00pm PADDY KEENAN

                Irish Uillean piper

                Alva’s Showroom

                1417 West 8th St, San Pedro, CA 90732

                310-519 1314

8:00pm PLOUGHBOYS CELTIC

                Tam O’Shanter

                2980 Los Feliz Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90039

                323-664-0228 

Saturday, March 14, 2015

10:00am-6:00pm              CAMARILLO CELTIC FAIRE

                Constitution Park

                1287 Paseo Camarillo, Camarillo, CA 93010

                Tammy Glenn CAREGIVERS 805-658-8530

1:00pm LONG BEACH IRISH (FOR A DAY) PARADE

                Pine Ave. from 7th St. to Broadway

                Long Beach, CA

3:00pm OXALIS

                Malibu Wines 

                31740 Mulholland Hwy., Malibu, CA 90265

8:00pm TRINITY IRISH DANCE

                'The Dawn'

                Santa Clarita Performing Arts Center at College of the Canyons

                26455 Rockwell Canyon Rd., Santa Clarita, CA 91355

                661-362-5304

8:00pm PADDY KEENAN

                Irish Uillean piper

                California Institute of Technology - Beckman Auditorium

                332 South Michigan Ave., Pasadena, CA 91106

                626-395-4652

                Presented by Caltech Public Events

8:00pm CALUM MORRISON

                Tam O’Shanter

                2980 Los Feliz Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90039

                323-664-0228 

8:30pm THE PRATIES

                Corrigan’s Irish Pub

                75 E High St, Moorpark, CA 93021

                805-532-1500

10:00pm               PLOUGHBOYS CELTIC

                Joxer Daly’s

                11168 Washington Blvd., Culver City, CA 90323

                310-838-3745

Sunday, March 15, 2015

10:00am-6:00pm              CAMARILLO CELTIC FAIRE

                Constitution Park

                1287 Paseo Camarillo, Camarillo, CA 93010

                Tammy Glenn CAREGIVERS 805-658-8530

3:00pm OXALIS

                The Grove 

                189 The Grove Dr, Los Angeles, CA 90036

5:00pm THE PRATIES

                JJ Sullivan’s

                22917 Ventura Blvd, Woodland Hills, CA 91364

                828-225-7468

5:00pm KEN O’MALLEY DUO

                One Colorado Courtyard

                24 East Union St., Pasadena, CA 91103

5:00pm HARVEY SISTERS

                Brendan’s Irish Pub, Camarillo

                1755 E. Daily Dr, Camarillo, CA

                805-383-4100

Monday, March 16, 2015

7:00pm PRE-ST. PATRICK'S DAY DANCE CÉILÍ

                Mayflower Club

                11110 Victory Blvd, North Hollywood, CA 91606

                Presented by the Celtic Arts Center

Tuesday, March 17, 2015

11:00am               BRILLIANT GYPSIES

                Griffins of Kinsale

                1001 Mission St., South Pasadena, CA 91030

                626-799-0926

1:00pm THE PRATIES

                Joxer Daly’s

                11168 Washington Blvd., Culver City, CA 90323

                310-838-3745

1:00pm KEN O’MALLEY DUO

                Finn McCool’s

                2702 Main St., Santa Monica, CA 90405

                310-452-1734

2:00pm PLOUGHBOYS CELTIC

                Tam O’Shanter

                2980 Los Feliz Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90039

                323-664-0228 

5:00pm OXALIS

                Joxer Daly’s

                11168 Washington Blvd., Culver City, CA 90323

                310-838-3745

5:30pm THE PRATIES

                The Wilde Thistle

                3454 Motor Ave., West Los Angeles, CA 980034

                310-730-6208

5:30pm KEN O’MALLEY

                Griffins of Kinsale

                1001 Mission St., South Pasadena, CA 91030

                626-799-0926

7:00pm BRILLIANT GYPSIES

                RedWhite+Bluezz

                37 S El Molino Ave, Pasadena, CA 91101’

                626-792-4441

7:00pm RAMBLING HOUSE BAND

                Molly Malone’s

                575 S. Fairfax Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90036

                323-935-1577

7:30pm WHISKEY SUNDAY

                Tam O’Shanter

                2980 Los Feliz Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90039

                323-664-0228 

8:00pm SLUGGER O’TOOLE

                Story Tavern

                150 S San Fernando Blvd, Burbank, CA 91502

8:00pm PLOUGHBOYS CELTIC

                Joe’s Great American Bar & Grill

                4311 W. Magnolia Blvd., Burbank, CA 91505-2728

                818-729-0805

9:00pm KEN O’MALLEY AND THE TWILIGHT LORDS

                Ireland’s 32

                13721 Burbank Blvd. Van Nuys, CA 91401

                818-785-4031

MARCH 12TH, 2015

While on vacation in Rome, I noticed a marble column in St. Peter's with a golden telephone on it. As a young priest passed by, I asked who the telephone was for. The priest told me it was a direct line to heaven, and if I'd like to call, it would be a thousand dollars. I was amazed, but declined the offer. Throughout Italy, I kept seeing the same golden telephone on a marble column. At each, I asked about it and the answer was always the same: It was a direct line to heaven and I could call for a thousand dollars.

Then I went to Ireland. When I finished my tour in Ireland. I decided to attend Mass at a local village church. When I walked in the door I noticed the golden telephone. Underneath it there was a sign stating: "DIRECT LINE TO HEAVEN: 25 cents." "Father," I said, "I have been all over Italy and in all the cathedrals I visited, I've seen telephones exactly like this one. But the price is always a thousand dollars. Why is it that this one is only 25 cents?" The priest smiled and said, "Darlin', you're in Ireland now. It's a local call."

Happy St. Patrick's Day...all my little leprechauns!

TRADITIONAL IRISH MUSIC FOR
ST. PADDY’S WEEKEND

Friday, March 13, 2015

8:00pm PADDY KEENAN

                Irish Uillean piper

                Alva’s Showroom

                1417 West 8th St, San Pedro, CA 90732

                310-519 1314

8:00pm PLOUGHBOYS CELTIC

                Tam O’Shanter

                2980 Los Feliz Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90039

                323-664-0228 

Saturday, March 14, 2015

10:00am-6:00pm              CAMARILLO CELTIC FAIRE

                Constitution Park

                1287 Paseo Camarillo, Camarillo, CA 93010

                Tammy Glenn CAREGIVERS 805-658-8530

1:00pm LONG BEACH IRISH (FOR A DAY) PARADE

                Pine Ave. from 7th St. to Broadway

                Long Beach, CA

3:00pm OXALIS

                Malibu Wines 

                31740 Mulholland Hwy., Malibu, CA 90265

8:00pm TRINITY IRISH DANCE

                'The Dawn'

                Santa Clarita Performing Arts Center at College of the Canyons

                26455 Rockwell Canyon Rd., Santa Clarita, CA 91355

                661-362-5304

8:00pm PADDY KEENAN

                Irish Uillean piper

                California Institute of Technology - Beckman Auditorium

                332 South Michigan Ave., Pasadena, CA 91106

                626-395-4652

                Presented by Caltech Public Events

8:30pm THE PRATIES

                Corrigan’s Irish Pub

                75 E High St, Moorpark, CA 93021

                805-532-1500

10:00pm               PLOUGHBOYS CELTIC

                Joxer Daly’s

                11168 Washington Blvd., Culver City, CA 90323

                310-838-3745

Sunday, March 15, 2015

10:00am-6:00pm              CAMARILLO CELTIC FAIRE

                Constitution Park

                1287 Paseo Camarillo, Camarillo, CA 93010

                Tammy Glenn CAREGIVERS 805-658-8530

3:00pm OXALIS

                The Grove 

                189 The Grove Dr, Los Angeles, CA 90036

5:00pm THE PRATIES

                JJ Sullivan’s

                22917 Ventura Blvd, Woodland Hills, CA 91364

                828-225-7468

5:00pm KEN O’MALLEY DUO

                One Colorado Courtyard

                24 East Union St., Pasadena, CA 91103

5:00pm HARVEY SISTERS

                Brendan’s Irish Pub, Camarillo

                1755 E. Daily Dr, Camarillo, CA

                805-383-4100

Monday, March 16, 2015

7:00pm PRE-ST. PATRICK'S DAY DANCE CÉILÍ

                Mayflower Club

                11110 Victory Blvd, North Hollywood, CA 91606

                Presented by the Celtic Arts Center

Tuesday, March 17, 2015

11:00am               BRILLIANT GYPSIES

                Griffins of Kinsale

                1001 Mission St., South Pasadena, CA 91030

                626-799-0926

1:00pm THE PRATIES

                Joxer Daly’s

                11168 Washington Blvd., Culver City, CA 90323

                310-838-3745

1:00pm KEN O’MALLEY DUO

                Finn McCool’s

                2702 Main St., Santa Monica, CA 90405

                310-452-1734

2:00pm PLOUGHBOYS CELTIC

                Tam O’Shanter

                2980 Los Feliz Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90039

                323-664-0228 

5:00pm OXALIS

                Joxer Daly’s

                11168 Washington Blvd., Culver City, CA 90323

                310-838-3745

5:30pm THE PRATIES

                The Wilde Thistle

                3454 Motor Ave., West Los Angeles, CA 980034

                310-730-6208

5:30pm KEN O’MALLEY

                Griffins of Kinsale

                1001 Mission St., South Pasadena, CA 91030

                626-799-0926

7:00pm BRILLIANT GYPSIES

                RedWhite+Bluezz

                37 S El Molino Ave, Pasadena, CA 91101’

                626-792-4441

7:00pm RAMBLING HOUSE BAND

                Molly Malone’s

                575 S. Fairfax Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90036

                323-935-1577

7:30pm WHISKEY SUNDAY

                Tam O’Shanter

                2980 Los Feliz Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90039

                323-664-0228 

8:00pm SLUGGER O’TOOLE

                Story Tavern

                150 S San Fernando Blvd, Burbank, CA 91502

8:00pm PLOUGHBOYS CELTIC

                Joe’s Great American Bar & Grill

                4311 W. Magnolia Blvd., Burbank, CA 91505-2728

                818-729-0805

9:00pm KEN O’MALLEY AND THE TWILIGHT LORDS

                Ireland’s 32

                13721 Burbank Blvd. Van Nuys, CA 91401

                818-785-4031

MARCH 8TH, 2015

HAPPY BIRTHDAY, DiCK FARINA
(March 8, 1937 – April 30, 1966)

February 19th, 2015

Three Women & The Truth

Check out the interview with Eliza Gilkyson


2015 GRAMMY WINNERS


February 17th, 2015

HAPPY MARDI GRAS

Dance for a Chicken: The Cajun Mardi Gras
(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xuMnttn8lSQ)


2015 GRAMMY WINNERS


February 16th, 2015

In Celebration of Presidents Day
(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hAUMhawQjBk)

Dance for a Chicken: The Cajun Mardi Gras
(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xuMnttn8lSQ)


2015 GRAMMY WINNERS


February 15th, 2015

Dance for a Chicken: The Cajun Mardi Gras
(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xuMnttn8lSQ)


2015 GRAMMY WINNERS


February 5th, 2015

Grammy Nomination for Best Folk Album
(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YA0fQhFNafs)


2014 GRAMMY OF INTEREST TO FOLKWORKS READERS


January 30th, 2015

Grammy Nomination for Best Americana Album
(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tJQubJJ2qks)


2014 GRAMMY OF INTEREST TO FOLKWORKS READERS


January 20th, 2015

Grammy Nomination for Best American Roots Song
(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4lFMK3UIa74)


2014 GRAMMY OF INTEREST TO FOLKWORKS READERS


January 4th, 2015

Grammy Nomination for Best American Roots Performance 
(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=duWv1eMNdrk)


2014 GRAMMY OF INTEREST TO FOLKWORKS READERS


December 21, 2014

Joe Spence singing the best Christmas song ever
(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rEgKEbT5a7Q)


2014 GRAMMY OF INTEREST TO FOLKWORKS READERS


December 19, 2014


2014 GRAMMY OF INTEREST TO FOLKWORKS READERS


The Joni Mitchell Interview

December 9, 2014

The Music Midnight Makes: In Conversation With Joni Mitchell on NPR this morning.


2014 GRAMMY OF INTEREST TO FOLKWORKS READERS


The great Spanish director of musical films Carlos Saura, together with the gifted cinematographer Vittorio Storaro (Apocalypse Now, Last Tango in Paris), presents FLAMENCO, FLAMENCO, a cinematic journey of light and life, the evolution of the songs, dances and music of this art that, in the director’s own words, is the heritage of the universe. The film shows that there is a powerful new flamenco being created by young talent finding its way all over the world and supported by the great living masters in Spain.

November 27, 2014

Peter La Farge

   

   

Wishing you all a HAPPY THANKSGIVING: Here's Johnny Cash singing Peter La Farge's Ballad of Ira Hayes. With thanks also to the Native American community.

If you don't know who Peter La Farge was, check out the wikipedia page.

Lily Henley new song premiers ... check out our review of last years great CD, Words Like Yours.

He is best known as Lead Belly. Though many releases list him as "Leadbelly", he himself wrote it as "Lead Belly". This is also the spelling on his tombstone, as well as of the Lead Belly Foundation. In 1994 the Lead Belly Foundation contacted an authority on the history of popular music, Colin Larkin, editor of the Encyclopedia of Popular Music, to ask if the name "Leadbelly" could be altered to "Lead Belly" in the hope that other authors would follow suit and use the artist's correct appellation.

Although Lead Belly usually played the twelve-string guitar, he could also play the piano, mandolin, harmonica, violin, and accordion. In some of his recordings, such as in one of his versions of the folk ballad "John Hardy", he performs on the accordion. In other recordings he sings while clapping his hands or stomping his foot.

The topics of Lead Belly's music covered a wide range, including gospel; blues about women, liquor, prison life, and racism; and folk songs about cowboys, prison, work, sailors, cattle herding, and dancing. He also wrote songs about people in the news, such as Franklin D. Roosevelt, Adolf Hitler, Jean Harlow, the Scottsboro Boys, and Howard Hughes.

Lead Belly was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1988 in the "Early Influence" category. In 2008, he was inducted into the Louisiana Music Hall of Fame.

Lead Belly Exhibit at the GRAMMY Museum

On November 16, 2014, The GRAMMY Museum will open Lead Belly: A Musical Legacy to mark the 125th anniversary of the birth of iconic Delta-Blues singer Huddie William Ledbetter, better known as "Lead Belly." Located on the Museum's third floor, this exhibit will offer visitors an in-depth look at his life and contributions he made to American Folk music and Blues. The museum will showcase a collection of documents and lyrics, along with his notorious Stella 12-string guitar provided by the Ledbetter family. The exhibit will run through May 2015.

On November 16 at 4:00pm, SS Jones and the New Ashgrove Players will perform the music of Lead Belly. 800 W. Olympic Blvd., Los Angeles, CA (corner of Olympic Boulevard and Figueroa Street), in the L.A. LIVE district.

NOVEMBER 15, 2014

Alphonse Bois Sec ArdoinHAPPY BIRTHDAY

Alphonse "Bois Sec" Ardoin (November 16, 1915 – May 16, 2007)

Creole accordionist who specialized in Cajun music (called "la la music" or "la musique Creole") and was influential in what became zydeco music.

For more information, surf over to this page


DID YOU KNOW?: FolkWorks is supported by our members and local advertisers. You can become a member by clicking here. If you would like to purchase an ad, click here.


NOVEMBER 15, 2014

Mick MoloneyHAPPY BIRTHDAY

Mick Moloney (November 15, 1944)

Michael "Mick" Moloney (born November 15, 1944) is a traditional Irish musician and scholar. Born in Limerick, County Limerick, he was an important figure on the Dublin folk-song revival in the 1960s. In 1973, he moved to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He gained early fame as a member of Irish group The Johnstons and The Emmet Spiceland but has since performed and recorded with a variety of groups and individuals, including Eugene O'Donnell and Séamus Egan, and Marie & Martin Reilly; he also worked closely with The Clancy Brothers & Tommy Makem. Mick also served as the artistic director for several major arts tours including The Green Fields of America, an ensemble of Irish musicians, singers and dancers which toured across the United States on several occasions. In all, he has produced and performed on over forty albums, and acted as advisor for scores of festivals and concerts all over America

For more information, surf over to this page


Tracy SchwarzBig

NOVEMBER 13, 2014

Tracy SchwarzHAPPY BIRTHDAY

Tracy Schwarz (November 13, 1938)

Don Stevens (All Music)

Tracy Schwarz is one of the greatest traditional fiddlers in America. His credits run from the New Lost City Ramblers and the Strange Creek Singers to recordings with other traditional musicians, his family, and in more recent years with many Cajun greats. Born in New York City but raised in New England and New Jersey, Schwarz first came to love country music from radio broadcasts of the late '40s. The music he heard inspired him to learn the banjo and guitar. While in college, Schwarz also mastered the mandolin and the bass fiddle. He soon began playing in assorted bluegrass bands around Washington, D.C.

For more information, surf over to this page

NOVEMBER 7, 2014

Joni MitchellHAPPY BIRTHDAY

Joni Mitchell (November 7, 1943)

Joni Mitchell is a Canadian musician, singer songwriter, and painter. Mitchell began singing in small nightclubs in Saskatchewan and Western Canada and then busking in the streets and dives of Toronto. In 1965, she moved to the United States and began touring. Some of her original songs ("Urge for Going", "Chelsea Morning", "Both Sides, Now", "The Circle Game") were covered by notable folk singers, allowing her to sign with Reprise Records and record her own debut album in 1968.

For more information, surf over to this page

NOVEMBER 6, 2014

Fred SmallHAPPY BIRTHDAY

Fred Small (November 6, 1952)

Fred Small, is an American singer-songwriter. He is also a lawyer and a Unitarian Universalist minister. His songs often make a political or ethical statement. Among his best-known songs are "Heart of the Appaloosa," "Everything Possible," "Peace Is", and "Cranes Over Hiroshima". He is hailed by Pete Seeger as "one of America's best songwriters".[citation needed]
His debut album, Love's Gonna Carry Us (1981), featured Small singing and accompanying himself on guitar. As his fame and success increased, so too did the production level of his albums, as he included more instrumentation, and appearances by other artists, including instrumental and vocal backing by popular New England folk artists. Famous fiddlers, guitarists, and mandolin players alike became a part of Small’s discography and helped Small increase his popularity.[1]

For more information, surf over to this page.

NOVEMBER 4, 2014

Kirk McGeeHAPPY BIRTHDAY

Kirk McGee (November 4, 1899 – October 24, 1983)

Kirk McGee was 1/2 of the McGee Brothers, American old-time performing duo with his brother Sam McGee.  Sam typically played guitar and Kirk usually played banjo or fiddle, although they were both proficient in multiple string instruments. The McGee Brothers were one of the most enduring acts on the Grand Ole Opry during the show's first fifty years. They made their initial appearance on the Opry in 1926 and the following year joined Uncle Dave Macon's band, the Fruit Jar Drinkers. In the 1930s, the McGees teamed up with early Opry fiddler Arthur Smith to form a string band known as the "Dixieliners," and in the 1940s they played and toured with Bill Monroe and His Bluegrass Boys and several other notable acts.

For more information, surf over to this page.

Well known in Hawaii and Japan during his early solo career in the early 2000s, Shimabukuro became famous internationally in 2006, when a video of him playing a virtuosic rendition of "While My Guitar Gently Weeps" was posted on YouTube without his knowledge and became one of the first viral videos on that site. His concert engagements, collaborations with legendary musicians, media appearances, and music production have snowballed since then. In 2012, an award-winning documentary was released tracking his life, career, and music, titled Jake Shimabukuro: Life on Four Strings; it has screened in a variety of festivals, aired repeatedly on PBS, and been released on DVD.

Jake will be performing in Southern California at the following locations:

October 30

Pepperdine Univ. Smothers Theatre

24255 Pacific Coast Hwy., Malibu, CA 90265

310-506-4522

October 31

California Center For The Arts

340 North Escondido Blvd., Escondido, CA 92025

800-988-4253

November 1

Cerritos Performing Arts Center – Lyric Theatre

12700 Center Court Dr., Cerritos, CA 90703

562 916-8501 or 800- 300-4345

OCTOBER 28, 2014

Hamilton CampHAPPY BIRTHDAY

Hamilton Camp (October 30, 1934 – October 2, 2005)

British singer-songwriter, actor and voice actor. Camp's debut as a folk singer was at the Newport Folk Festival in 1960; and his first recording, with Bob Gibson, was Bob Gibson & Bob Camp at the Gate of Horn, from 1961.

For more information, surf over to this page


DID YOU KNOW?: FolkWorks started as a hard copy newspaper. We printed 12-15000 copies every two months for 7 years. You can find the PDF versions by using the main menu and finding ARCHIVES on the right..


OCTOBER 28, 2014

Ted HawkinsHAPPY BIRTHDAY

Ted Hawkins (October 28, 1936 – January 1, 1995)

American singer-songwriter. Born in Biloxi, Mississippi, Hawkins was an enigmatic figure through most of his career; he split his time between his adopted hometown of Venice Beach, California where he was a mostly anonymous street performer, and Europe, where he and his songs were better known and well received in clubs and small concert halls.

For more information, surf over to this page.

If you're not already familiar with www.folkstreams.net, click on over and lose a couple hours.

The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA)  has a great article on Folkstreams....check it out.

Here's a brief excerpt:

"An account of the blues experience through the recollections and performances of NEA National Heritage Fellow B.B. King, Son Thomas, inmates from Parchman prison, a barber from Clarkesdale, a salesman from Beale Street, and others. Give My Poor Heart Ease (1974) is one of a series of films made in Mississippi in the mid 1970s by William Ferris and the Center for Southern Folklore and produced in association with Howard Sayre Weaver. View the entire film here."


OCTOBER 27, 2014

Floyd CramerHAPPY BIRTHDAY

Floyd Cramer (October 27, 1933 – December 31, 1997)

American Hall of Fame pianist who was one of the architects of the Nashville sound". He was known for his "slip note" piano style, where an out-of-key note slides into the correct note.

For more information, surf over to this page.

OCTOBER 21, 2014

Clyde DavenportHAPPY BIRTHDAY 

Clyde Davenport (October 21, 1921)

Old-time fiddler and banjo player from Monticello, Kentucky.

For more information, surf over to this page or this page.

OCTOBER 18, 2014

buddy macmasterHAPPY BIRTHDAY

Buddy MacMaster  (October 18, 1924-August 20, 2014)

One of the most renowned artists in the tradition of Cape Breton fiddle music.

For more information, surf over to his wiki page.

OCTOBER 16, 2014

Al PettewayHAPPY BIRTHDAY

Al Petteway  (October 16, 1952)

Grammy-winning guitarist known primarily for his acoustic fingerstyle work[1] both as a soloist and with well-known folk artists such as Amy White, Tom Paxton, Jethro Burns, Jonathan Edwards, Cheryl Wheeler, Debi Smith, Bonnie Rideout, Maggie Sansone and many others. His own compositions rely heavily on Celtic and Appalachian influences and he is known for his use of DADGAD tuning.

For more information, surf over to his wiki page.

OCTOBER 13, 2014

Paul SimonHAPPY BIRTHDAY

Paul Simon  (October 13, 1942)

Musician, actor and singer-songwriter. Simon's fame, influence, and commercial success began as part of the duo Simon & Garfunkel, formed in 1964 with musical partner Art Garfunkel. Simon wrote nearly all of the pair's songs, including three that reached No. 1 on the U.S. singles charts: "The Sound of Silence", "Mrs. Robinson", and "Bridge Over Troubled Water."

For more information, surf over to his wiki page.

Saturday, October 11:

LORD HURON BLIND PILOT SHAKEY GRAVES
LANGHORNE SLIM

OCTOBER 10, 2014

2014 BLUEGRASS SITUATION FESTIVAL

The 2014 LA Bluegrass Situation festival, will take place on Friday and Saturday, October 10 and 11 at the The Theatre at Ace Hotel in downtown LA. The fourth-ever, expanded affair has grown from its founding grounds at the legendary Largo at the Coronet Theatre in West Hollywood to the newly-opened, delicately restored movie palace originally built by Mary Pickford and Charlie Chaplin in 1927.

2-day tickets are already sold out, single-day and VIP Saturday tickets may be purchased online.

Friday, October 10:

CAROLINA CHOCOLATE DROPS JOSH RITTER
WILLIE WATSON

John PrineHAPPY BIRTHDAY

John Prine (October 10, 1946)

Country folk singer-songwriter. He has been active as a composer, recording artist, and live performer since the early 1970s.

For more information, surf over to his wiki page.

OCTOBER 9, 2014

O.V. WrightHAPPY BIRTHDAY

O.V. Wright (October 9, 1939 - November 16, 1980)

Singer who is generally regarded as a blues artist by African American fans in the Deep South; he is also regarded as one of Southern soul's most authoritative and individual artists.[2] His best known songs include "That's How Strong My Love Is" (1964), "You're Gonna Make Me Cry" (1965), "Nucleus of Soul" (1968), "A Nickel and a Nail" (1971), "I Can't Take It" (1971) and "Ace of Spades" (1971).

For more information, surf over to his wiki page.

OCTOBER 8, 2014

Russ BarrenbergHAPPY BIRTHDAY

Russ Barrenberg (October 8, 1950)

Grammy-nominated American bluegrass musician.

For more information, surf over to his wiki page.

OCTOBER 7, 2014

1px solid #000000; float: right;" />HAPPY BIRTHDAY

Uncle Dave Macon

(October 7, 1870-March 22, 1952).

Old-time banjo player, singer, songwriter, and comedia.

For more information, surf over to his wiki page.

OCTOBER 6, 2014

Richard Dyer-BennettHAPPY BIRTHDAY

Richard Dyer-Bennett

(October 6, 1913-December 14, 1991).

English Born, American Folk Singer.

For more information, surf over to his wiki page.

OCTOBER 5, 2014

Roy Book BinderHAPPY BIRTHDAY

Roy Book Binder (born 1943).

Blues guitarist, singer songwriter and storyteller/ For more information, surf over to his wiki page.

OCTOBER 3, 2014

HAPPY BIRTHDAY Keb' Mo' (born 1951). For more information, surf over to his wiki page.

OCTOBER 2, 2014

HAPPY BIRTHDAY Don McClean (born 1945). Check out the extensive interview by Ross Altman. Surf over to his wiki page.

OCTOBER 1, 2014

THIS AIN'T NO MOUSE MUSIC! The Story of Chris Strachwitz and Arhoolie Records

Don’t miss the new documentary, This Ain’t No Mouse Music!  about the legendary founder of Arhoolie Records, Chris Strachwitz, coming to the Downtown Independent theater at 251 S. Main St. in LA on October 1st through 9th! Opening night, Wednesday Oct. 1, the filmmakers and Chris will be in attendance. Join him for on a hip-shaking stomp from Texas to New Orleans, Cajun country to Appalachia, on a passionate quest for the musical soul of America.

August 19, 2014

 Concert September 27, 2014 

February 12, 2014

Pink Anderson

Pinkney "Pink" Anderson was an American blues singer and guitarist.

Born: February 12, 1900, Laurens, SC

Died: August 12, 1974, Spartanburg, SC

American Street Songs - Rev. Gary Davis and Pink Anderson - Riverside RLP 12-611

Pink Anderson: Vol. 1 Carolina Bluesman (1961) Prestige/Bluesville BV 1038

Pink Anderson: Carolina Medicine Show Hokum & Blues with Baby Tate (1962) Folkways Records FS 3588

Pink Anderson: Vol. 2 Medicine Show Man (1962) Prestige/Bluesville BV 1051 / OBCCD-587-2

The Blues Of Pink Anderson: Ballad & Folksinger, Vol. 3 (1963) Prestige/Bluesville BV 1071 / OBCCD 577-1

Source Wikipedia

Pink Anderson - I Got a Woman
(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oM1_6CFt5Mg)

February 11, 2014

JoshWhite1945Josh White

Born: February 11, 1914, Greenville, SC
Died: September 6, 1969, Manhasset, NY

Joshua Daniel White, known as Josh White, was an American singer, guitarist, songwriter, actor, and civil rights activist. He also recorded under the names "Pinewood Tom" and "Tippy Barton" in the 1930s. White grew up in the Jim Crow South

Albums: The Roots of the Blues, From New York to London, More
Movies: Dreams That Money Can Buy, The Walking Hills