• FOLKWORKS CALENDAR (click here)

     
  • FolkWorks Benefit Concert - This Saturday - See below ...

     
  • THEATRE REVIEWS

    The Resurrection of Paul Robeson:

    “Paul Robeson” At The
    Nate Holden Performing Arts Center

    Easter Sunday, April 20, 2014

    By Ross Altman

    Keith David - Paul RobesonFor an artist of Paul Robeson’s stature—except that there is no artist of Paul Robeson’s stature—to have become a stranger in his own land is one of the more improbable stories of a so-called free society. At one time the most famous performer in America—star of stage (Othello), screen (Show Boat), radio (Ballad for Americans), author (Here I Stand) and recording artist (for Columbia and Vanguard Records), Robeson strode across the American landscape like a colossus. No one would have been surprised to learn that he was a Phi Beta Kappa scholar at Rutgers, a two-time All-American football player and the toast of British Aristocracy after making his debut singing Ol’ Man River in Show Boat in London’s West End in 1927. He was declared “the Voice of the Century” long before the 20th Century was over—sharing that title with Marian Anderson.

    Read more: THE RESURRECTION OF PAUL ROBESON


    All Alone with Paul Robeson:

    The Tallest Tree in the Forest

    The Mark Taper Forum - April 19, 2014

    By Ross Altman

    Tallest Tree in the Forest - Daniel BeatyWho is the real Paul Robeson? The Tallest Tree in the Forest or the biggest windbag in Los Angeles? It wasn’t clear to this reviewer last night at the opening of the new one-man play about Robeson by actor Daniel Beaty at The Mark Taper Forum at The Music Center—until half way through the performance—when he sang Zog Nit Keynmol—Never Say—the Warsaw Ghetto anthem penned by Hirsh Glick, the 22-year old Vilna poet who wrote the song upon hearing news of the Jewish resistance to the Nazi attempt to liquidate the ghetto on April 19, 1943, as a birthday present for Adolph Hitler, who was born on April 20—today, as I write this review on Easter Sunday, Hitler’s birthday.

    Read more: ALL ALONE WITH PAUL ROBESON

     
  • FolkWorksLogo-COLOR web

    ANNUAL BENEFIT CONCERT

    Saturday April 26 8pm

    Reception at 7pm

    Our annual benefit concert has always been a fun, ear-opening event and this year promises to be no exception.

    Tracy-Newman-benefit 2014 for web

    at the
    SANTA MONICA Woman's Club

    1210 Fourth St., Santa Monica, CA 90401
    (near Wilshire & 4th St.)

    Tickets: $20 general admission,
    $25 VIP reserved seating

    Click here to buy your tickets now!

    Info: concerts@FolkWorks.org       818-785-3839

    Emcee Tracy Newman

    Always entertaining, Tracy may throw  in some of her own songs.

     

    Sausage Grinder

    SAUSAGE GRINDER photo for benefit for web

    Los Angeles’ all-natural hillbilly and country blues band, combines the traditional sounds of fiddle and banjo breakdowns with the low-down sound of country blues, topped off with a touch of ragtime and hillbilly jazz. The versatile acoustic ensemble features fiddle, banjo, guitar, mandolin, washboard, and a few odds and ends.

    Nevenka

    Nevenka 2014 for web

    The popular Los Angeles-based women’s chorus that brings to life vocal folk/roots traditions from around the world. Their songs range from Bulgaria, Georgia, Russia, Bosnia to Rom and Sephardic songs - as well as recently added American and Irish music. Their spellbinding harmonies are at the core of their eclectic repertoire. Whether a simple American song or the complex harmonies of Bulgaria the voices of Nevenka’s women are sure to move you. While mostly singing a cappella, they are occasionally accompanied by percussion, mandolin, guitar, citern or panduri.

    Swing Riots Quirktette

    SWING RIOTS color NEW LINEUP for web

    The Swing Riots are comprised of 6 core members who have played for decades in everything from Balkan dance bands to traditional Swing groups. They perform an irreverent gumbo of Gypsy & Creole Jazz, Klezmer & Romanian Horas, Parisian Musette & the occasional wild card thrown in for good measure. 

    Tunacious

    TUNACIOUS for webContradanceTunacious is a Celtic genre-bending band with songs and dance tunes with a blowout contra dance to wind up the evening.

     
  • FOLKWORKS CONCERTS

    Upcoming Concerts

    (Click on hyperlink for tickets)

    Series at the Talking Stick Café

    FISHTANK ENSEMBLE     May 24th         ANTONIO SACRE, MICHAEL McCARTY and others     June 28th
           Gypsy                                                                 Storytelling

    NEVENKA     September 27th                        SYNCOPATHS     October 25th
           East European Women's Choir                            Upbeat Celtic

     


    FolkWorks Benefit Concert   April 26th

    Swing Riots Quirktette, Sausage Grinder, Nevenka, Tunacious
                     emcee: Tracy Newman


    Rose Garden of Peace Concert  May 31st

    With Yuval Ron Ensemble

     
  • COLUMN OF THE WEEK

    January-February 2014

    For the Love of Wade

    By David Bragger

    wade ward 2I love Wade Ward! When I started immersing myself in old time music, I first heard Wade Ward on an out of print compilation of Lomax recordings. Soon after, I picked up the Smithsonian Folkways recording Uncle Wade - A Memorial To Wade Ward: Old Time Virginia Banjo Picker, 1892-1971 and was blown away at the sophisticated simplicity of his playing on both fiddle and banjo. Something about his bold, archaic style just sent lightning bolts right through my body when I first heard him.

    Read more: For the Love of Wade

Print

September-October 2012

How Old? You’re Kidding, Right?

By Dennis Roger Reed

Dennis_Roger_Reed_oldPart of the aging process is figuring out that you are old. You’ve done certain things thousands of times. Why aren’t you better at it? And how much longer do you have to improve?

Most of this stuff comes in little puffs. I recently realized I’d been playing a club in Newport Beach for 25 years, and had held the same last Friday of the month gig at the club for over ten years. That’s a long time. Also, I had to realize that I’d played with a couple of the guys in the band for over 20 years. No wonder they look so old.

I think more of a shock comes when you “inventory” yourself and your accomplishments. I’ve been writing songs for 40 years. Although I’ve written some good songs, shouldn’t there be more? Or better songs? I’ve played the guitar for 45 years, the mandolin for 22 years, and the bass for 20 years. One would assume that I’d be a cross between Segovia, Bill Monroe and Jack Bruce, but I am decidedly not. I’ve been writing about music for a much shorter time, only about 15 years, so most likely I will get better at that.

One can argue that since Mick Jagger and Keith Richard are 187 years old and still playing rock and roll it’s not a young man’s sport any longer. Folk and roots music has always been much more forgiving about age. Pete Seeger, Doc Watson and many others perform(ed) well into their 80s. But marketing does rear its ugly head. I can recall seeing a folk diva that used 40 year old photos in her promos and ads. Odd, since she was/is still a very attractive middle aged woman, but apparently a more marketable young woman.

Since it’s an aging world, we can expect more guys with hair extensions and spandex pants still romping at 65 or 70. Ringo just hit 72, looks good and can still smack the drums well. Debbie Reynolds still tours. Synchronized walkers next? Probably.

What about us oldsters that want to try something new? Luckily, 70 is the new 60 or something like that. The truth is that taking up a musical instrument or learning to write songs probably is easier when we’re younger, but most of us older folks have something young people don’t and that’s free time. Unless some major physical maladies are involved, there is no reason why an older person can’t learn an instrument or start writing songs. Stretch yourself a little.

My goal is to continue as if I’ll live to 125, but with more focus on learning more about the instruments I play, and turning my “give-a-shitter” (Bob Brozman’s term for how we govern ourselves) way down when I perform.

So go out and support live music. Don’t notice how old the performers may be. Tip the wait staff, smile at your brother and everybody get together and try to love one another.

Right now.

Dennis Roger Reed is a singer-songwriter, musician and writer based in San Clemente, CA. He’s released two solo CDs, and appeared on two CDs with the newgrassy Andy Rau Band and two CDs with the roots rockers Blue Mama. His prose has appeared in a variety of publications such as the OC Weekly and MOJO magazine. Writing about his music has appeared in an eclectic group of publications such as Bass Player, Acoustic Musician, Dirty Linen, Blue Suede News and Sing Out! His oddest folk resume entry would be the period of several months in 2002 when he danced onstage as part of both Little Richard’s and Paul Simon’s revues. He was actually asked to do the former and condoned by the latter. He apparently knows no shame.

  

All Columns by Dennis Roger Reed

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